The Next Generation of ARMed Devices Will Compete Nicely With Intel

On top of the announcements of products that will compete with Wintel on the desktop/notebook/etc ARM CPUs scheduled for production next year are just too amazing not to be competitive with x86: Qualcomm’s next SnapDragon will be 2.5gHz quadcore and give 12 times the performance of current models with 75% less power. Built at 28nm, it will be near the point of vanishing returns on lower power consumption and totally overpowered for many current uses. RAM will soon use more power than the CPU…

Who will want an x86/amd64 hair-drier on their desks when one of these gadgets can fit inside the keyboard or monitor or smartphone with room to spare? In 2010 production of “desktop” PCs flattened. 2011 should see decline with products like this coming to market. Something small enough to fit in your pocket should do the job. Current ARMed smartphones are rapidly declining in price so x86 cannot compete on price/performance and that other OS will be squeezed out as more personal computing will be done on ARM with Android/Linux.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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11 Responses to The Next Generation of ARMed Devices Will Compete Nicely With Intel

  1. Richard Chapman says:

    “A surprising comment coming from someone using an antique computer.”

    Not at all. It’s a badge of honor.

  2. oldman says:

    “Oh dear! Someone should tell M$. They plan to port to ARM”

    Good point! I stand corrected. Microsofts creation of a windows 8 port for ARM is the one joker in the mix. It will be interesting to see what its arrival brings to the mix.

  3. oldman says:

    ““Windows class applications”. Kind of has an archaic ring to it. Like Dreadnought class battleships.

    A surprising comment coming from someone using an antique computer.

  4. Richard Chapman says:

    “My first computing job on DEC equipment was in a control-room running at about 80dB.”

    Circa Mid 1980s Data General, academic computing. Small room, half was taken up by the air-conditioning unit. I used to play in a rock band… it was louder than that.

  5. Ray says:

    And destory expandibility? I don’t think my video card would be happy. 🙁

  6. I happened to be using an XP machine this morning. It refused to wake up so I rebooted. The fan growled at me… I was alarmed as if a dog got close and growled. Fanlessness is a great thing and should be encouraged on all “personal” computers. There is no reason in this age that a human being should inflict white noise on themselves to compute. My first computing job on DEC equipment was in a control-room running at about 80dB. It was very hard to think.

    The ATX case is nothing but a fan with a computer inside. We should discard useless stuff like fans. Thin clients and Via/ARM/Geode/etc. low power chips are the way to go.

  7. Richard Chapman says:

    “Windows class applications”. Kind of has an archaic ring to it. Like Dreadnought class battleships.

    I think if someone were looking for allies in the war against low power CPUs, one need not look any further than the CPU cooling fan manufactures.

  8. oldman wrote:”the ARM processor cant run windows class applications at all, and if the market trends continue to go the way they seem to be going, it never will.

    Oh dear! Someone should tell M$. They plan to port to ARM…

  9. oldman says:

    “2-4 2.5gHz processors will run most desktops very well.”

    Considering that there are no running ARM desktops, I find your assumption questionable. beyond this, comparing performance between ARM and x86 is meaningless – the ARM processor cant run windows class applications at all, and if the market trends continue to go the way they seem to be going, it never will.

    “If your app does not run on it, that’s a show-stopper for you but most people seem quite content with the stuff they can run on a smartphone”

    Smartphones serve a different market than desktops Pog. Most people I know use them for playing games, watching movies listening to music, not to mention the usual phone related stuff, on the go. The form factor in general was never designed to be a general desktop. The best smartphone I have seen has a 2×5 inch display, a slideout keyboard that makes the old PC Jr Chicklet keyboard look spacious. Doing any kind of extended content creation on these devices is difficult. NONE of the main stream smartphones that I know of have keyboard and monitor hookups. Thinking that smartphones are not the next desktop replacement, is IMHO , wishful thinking.

    applications, and some very rudimentary
    and people are not waiting years until M$ and its partners port everything.”

    On what direct experience do you base this Pog. My experience has been that most people

  10. 2-4 2.5gHz processors will run most desktops very well. That performance likely beats half of the existing XP machines that are out there and people will use a portable PC on their desks. These things can drive huge monitors with video or whatever. Apps do matter, but strangely, Android is selling OK with the apps that exist in the hundreds of thousands for Android. If your app does not run on it, that’s a show-stopper for you but most people seem quite content with the stuff they can run on a smartphone and people are not waiting years until M$ and its partners port everything.

  11. oldman says:

    Pog:

    If one reads this article, it becomes quite evident that qualcomm is targeting this processor at the mobile device market of smart phones and tablets. No mention is made of desktops.

    The average desktop computer user cares more about the applications that they run than about power consumption. and the average desktop computer user is unlikely to give up their desktop for a mobile device, especially if they use ther computer more than minimally.

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