Sweden

When I was a boy, I had neighbours in Canada who were born in Sweden. I used a “Swede saw”, Swedish chainsaws and I met “richer” people who drove Volvos. Then there was Abba. I fell in love with Swedish Mausers at one point.

Now the news from Sweden is all about getting locked up for weak evidence after partying, hosting the data of the guy they locked up, and suicide bombers.

Sweden, the times, and I have all changed. I am not sure it’s for the better, though. I plan to travel home for Christmas Break tomorrow. Perhaps some pumpkin pie, ice-cream and turkey will improve my mood.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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11 Responses to Sweden

  1. No one has ever accused me of being a literary writer. My daughter, who has the talent to be one, wrinkles her nose when she reads my writing. I do have some insights and experience of life that I communicate but I could never make a living as a writer.

  2. Chelsi says:

    I actually found this more eenttrianing than James Joyce.

  3. oldman says:

    “It’s just that they do not have the right to prevent people from creating and using software like Harmony.”

    As far I know, anyone of can use Apaches un-certified fork of Java. ISP’s can market it as they see fit as part of their offerings as well. However, as long as Oracle distributes maintains extends and certifies the “official” version of Java, harmony will never be seen as “true” Java, and will probably begin to fall behind the official Java as time goes on, exacerbating the problem.

    If Apache can manage to establish legitimacy for Harmony as something other than an open source hack, then that is another metter entirely.

    we will have to see.

  4. Of course, Oracle’s IP rights stand. It’s just that they do not have the right to prevent people from creating and using software like Harmony.

    The world does not accept Oracle as dictator.

  5. oldman says:

    “They do not own the copyright to Dalvik and software patents are idiotic. You cannot patent mathematical/logical algorithms which is all that software is.”

    Pog, that is for the courts to decide, not you or I.
    and until they do, Oracle’s IP rights stand.

    “His greed blinds him to fundamental truth about IT.”

    There was a time when the fundamental truth of IT was that one needed to get one hands dirty coding and even doing hardware integration to get certain tasks done. Software when it existed at all needed to be modified to get it working, and one could easily spend more time mucking around in source code than getting work done. Now one can get those same tasks done by buying software and hardware off the shelf and just working with it. Having the source code is irrelevant, because all one needs is the working application.

    If I have learned anything in over thirty years in computing, it is that there is no fundamental truth in IT. IT is a moving target whose requirements and capabilities change over time, and attempting to nail it down by codifying a fundamental truth is nothing more than an invitation to being left in the dust as you are passed by.

  6. Google did not use any of the code that Oracle owns. They wrote their own stuff and used stuff written in Java. Oracle has no ownership of software just because it is written in Java. Oracle is suing because they claim Dalvik somehow violates their property rights. I don’t see that. It is not a copy or even a clone, just an interpreter. Does Oracle own every interpreter just because they own one? Nope.

    Expect Oracle’s case to be tossed for lack of basis. Even deranged lunatics are allowed to sue people but they don’t get to win usually. They do not own the copyright to Dalvik and software patents are idiotic. You cannot patent mathematical/logical algorithms which is all that software is. None of the concepts in Java, or Dalvik are novel. They are just an industry standard like Pascal. There were interpreters for LISP and many other languages going back to the dawn of modern computing. The whole microcoded x86 architecture is essentially a virtual machine. Putting one in software instead of hardware does not make it any more virtual. Google will fight this and win. Ellison will look silly then, but risk-takers like him don’t mind failure. They win often enough because they keep trying but now we know how greedy he is. His greed blinds him to fundamental truth about IT.

  7. oldman says:

    “Well, Google found out it costs, big time, to even use a system that slurps up Java code and runs.”

    As well they should. Google tried to do an end run around Oracles Intellectual property so that they could make money without having to pay Oracle.

    Users of Java as well as ISP’s who respect Oracles property rights will have no such problem.

  8. oldman says:

    “I would bet businesses would prefer less complex licensing and not having Ellison’s fingers around their throats.”

    What complexity? Java run time is free and certified.

    “Harmony fits.:”

    With all due respect, you are making an assumption that business will accept apaches rebuild of java as well as its standing to certify that build.

    Once feature drift starts (and it will) the issue of certification as a foundation for commercial applications will become an even bigger issue.

    Harmony is a non starter in the commercial side of things right now.

  9. ray says:

    Harmony isn’t the only free Java implementation in the game. What about Icedtea?

  10. Well, Google found out it costs, big time, to even use a system that slurps up Java code and runs. Oracle means Java is not free. Many businesses have apps written in Java. Oracle suing Google for Java is an eye-opener. Businesses may feel safer running Harmony instead.

    Apache can form a community to certify Harmony in a better way than Oracle. What’s with freeing the source code but restricting the Java machines and TCKs? I would bet businesses would prefer less complex licensing and not having Ellison’s fingers around their throats.

    Harmony is a complete re-write of Java just as GNU/Linux was a complete re-write of UNIX. Business will use a clone or a re-write. They want something that works and costs less. Harmony fits.

  11. oldman says:

    “A whole industry based on Harmony will emerge in the next year with all kinds of growth opportunities for ambitious people. ”

    Unfortunately, I fear that ambition will have nothing to do with it. Without formal certification, no business will touch it, especially given the fact that the real java will continue to be available from oracle.

    There is simply no business case for using a clone, especially an un-certified one when the real thing is available for free.

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