Ten Years

That’s how long CTO of a large government departments plans to keep “7” going. Then he thinks they may have very little need for that other OS. He is putting “7” on thin clients and they can last 10 years having no moving parts. Read about it. That’s pretty well how I see things except that I would use GNU/Linux now instead of that other OS.

Expect M$’s client revenues per machine to plunge if this idea catches on. It will happen. People do want lower costs, less power consumption, increased reliability and freedom from the monopoly.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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2 Responses to Ten Years

  1. The bigger the business the more prominent the line-item in the budget IT will be. Many IT budgets are squeezed because the bosses do not see that the expense of buying a new PC and new licences gets the business any more than the old PC and licences did last year. Many businesses that skipped Vista and have not gone to “7” are still running XP on 6-8 year old machines. The ones we picked up have been utterly reliable: 1 motherboard failure in the year I have been here.

    M$ has been too greedy for more than a decade. That’s why people have been using XP so long, to cut down the per annum cost. The need to buy new hardware and licences every few years is entirely artificial and that expense gets nothing done for business. The most-used features of software have scarcely changed in a decade. A measure of the greed has been the margin. Any business can compare its margin with M$’s and they will wonder why they do business with thieves. OEMs for instance have margins of the order of single %. That is easily seen as excess profit. Any business can time the market and have great margins briefly as AMD did when they brought out AMD64. They sold chips for $1000 that they now sell for $200. SUN saw it when they went to buy 20K licences for Office. They bought StarOffice lock, stock and barrel for much less. Any large business can replace M$’s software with FLOSS or its own for less, much less. They can get the same performance or better with $0 worth of GNU/Linux and OpenOffice.org for many tasks. The return on investment is spectacular especially if compared to buying new hardware and new licences from Wintel.

    Cost may not be the top of the list of concerns but it is near the top.

  2. oldman says:

    “Expect M$’s client revenues per machine to plunge if this idea catches on. It will happen.

    Unfortunately, to legally use microsoft OS’s in a virtualized environment one must pay a yearly fee per virtualized instance.

    “People do want lower costs, less power consumption, increased reliability and freedom from the monopoly.”

    Businesses want to run the applications that they need at a reasonable cost. As long as microsoft does not get greedy, most businesses will just chalk any fees paid up to the cost of doing business.

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