Robert Pogson

One man, closing all the windows.

Posts Tagged / market share

  • Jul 30 / 2014
  • 1
technology

83% of Chinese Get Their Internet Fix From Smartphones

Yep. That’s straight from CNNIC, the China Internet Network Information Center.

Yes, they still use desktops for that but the preferred medium, even at home is the smartphone. Wintel is doomed. Too expensive. Too inflexible. Too immobile. Too impersonal. It’s not just the Chinese. A whole generation of humans is growing up knowing that M$ is unnecessary for human existence.

OK, so I don’t read Chinese… I identified stuff from an article on Digitimes. They get it. 527 million of the 632 million users of the Internet in China use smartphones. Why would they switch device when they get home?

  • Jul 25 / 2014
  • 15
technology

Chromebooks Accelerate

“Acer has seen booming sales of Chromebooks, including government procurement orders for educational purposes in many countries, and therefore has asked supply chains to increase production to reduce supply shortages, according to company CEO Jason Chen, adding that global Chromebook shipments in 2014 are expected to increase 70% on year.” It’s the netbook all over again. This time Wintel is cutting prices in a big way to try to keep up but the cat’s out of the bag and won’t return. The whole world, OEMs, developers, retailers and consumers know FLOSS works for them and even businesses are buying up Chromebooks. Add this to the tsunami of smartphones and global growth of FLOSS on */Linux looks to be huge.
Think 0.2% of installed base is nothing? Consider that happened in about a year. If there are 1.5billion PCs in the world that comes to 3million units in one year. Will cutting the price of Wintel stop that from doubling this year? I doubt it. While the low price of Chromebooks is appealing, the reliability and ease of use are also important. Further, Chromebooks also have room to drop in price. The most popular notebook on Amazon.com is the Acer 720 Chromebook which was just reduced in price to $179. Can Wintel cut its prices in time to have any effect? I doubt it. Acer and others are maxed out now. By Christmas they will be breaking out.

See Acer sees booming sales of Chromebooks, says CEO.

See also, Why Chromebook Sales Are Surging in Schools, Enterprises

  • Jul 24 / 2014
  • 8
technology

Choosing Debian GNU/Linux

Here’s a guy who like me chose Debian GNU/Linux. His tastes are a little different but he gets what he needs because Debian is reliable and diverse.“all the hardware and related software updating works insanely well, even better than at first, which wasn’t bad at all anyway with a minimal amount of research. Easier and far less time (and bandwidth) consuming than Windows with its constant reboot, check for more updates, reboot again, ad infinitum thing, not to mention having to update all the non-native software separately in a piecemeal manner. With Debian (or any Linux really) I can leave the machine running for months, and do, with no issues at all, updating all throughout that uptime. Maybe I’ll reboot for a kernel update just to see if the video driver thing’s been mildly futzed, but as I said, even that’s not been happening for months and months now. It’s rock solid stable and reliable.” It appears that Ubuntu GNU/Linux is more popular but that’s a result of Canonical actually having salesmen and major OEMs helping distribute their product. If Debian had such salesmen, it would not be a clone of Ubuntu GNU/Linux but quite a different fish.

For me, APT, the Advanced Packaging Tool, their “release when ready” approach, and their huge repository are the key features that make Debian GNU/Linux so attractive. I can get almost any PC to do my bidding with it. I too, usually start with a minimal installation, not even one box checked from the installer programme. I then add what I want in a computer system: X, XFCE4, my favourite applications and my favourite servers and databases. That turns any PC with a bit of RAM and CPU into a miniature version of the Internet with powerful nodes and great web applications. I use the browser for most things except polishing stuff for presentations. Debian GNU/Linux works for me.

See the other guy’s view at Two Years With Debian GNU/Linux – An Average Guy's Verdict.

  • Jul 23 / 2014
  • 5
technology

Go, Toulouse! City Saves €1.000.000 Via LibreOffice And That’s Not All They Do With FLOSS

It’s rather obvious to me but others still deny:

  1. that organizations of any size can use LibreOffice instead of M$’s offering, and
  2. that organizations of any size can save a bundle of money doing so.

Munich and Toulouse and the government of the UK and … are all strong counter-examples “Software licenses for productivity suites cost Toulouse 1.8 million euro every three years. Migration cost us about 800,000 euro, due partly to some developments. One million euro has actually been saved in the first three years. It is a compelling proof in the actual context of local public finance”to this mystical belief that one needs to spend far more than the cost of IT to get any production from IT. FLOSS works. It’s a GUI. Anyone can use it and the cost of a licence is $0. Is that so hard to figure out? The cost of maintaining and updating the software is less with FLOSS too, thanks to the wonderful FLOSS licences that permit admins to copy/modify/distribute to their hearts’ content.
“50 per cent of the operating systems in Toulouse are based on Linux. These systems support the majority of our intranet, extranet and internet sites, plus some web-based business applications, all based on a LAMP architecture – Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP” Toulouse also uses a lot of FLOSS on the servers for similar benefits. As they modernize their fleet of computers both desktop and server they get all those great benefits everytime they install a machine or an OS or an application. FLOSS is the gift that keeps on giving. I will never forget the first few times I installed FLOSS and GNU/Linux. Stuff just worked so much better and nothing prevented me from providing local services on the network: not budgets, and not licences. I was free to get the best benefit from the expenditure on hardware rather than constantly being prevented from doing what I wanted. Large organizations have the same freedom I experienced although they call it “productivity” and “the bottom line”. It’s all good.

See Toulouse saves 1 million euro with LibreOffice | Joinup.

  • Jul 22 / 2014
  • 17
technology

The Monopoly Sinks Slowly Into The West

“Windows OEM non-Pro revenue decreased 9%”
“non-Pro” is the one consumers buy, eh? That means while sales of */Linux are rising everywhere, the empire is collapsing at a great rate, despite economic revival and thriving emerging economies. M$ just isn’t selling what people want, freedom. The “Pro” folks, however, are in a sad state, being led around by the nose by M$, forced forever to keep buying new PCs and software if they want M$’s permission to run their IT…

I recommend they all switch to Debian GNU/Linux. I did years ago and I’m glad I did.

See M$’s latest quarterly report.

UPDATE Another nail in the coffin…U.K. Cabinet Office Adopts ODF as Exclusive Standard for Sharable Documents

See also The Announcement from the Cabinet Office: Open document formats selected to meet user needs

That is a big deal. Once the lock-in of M$’s web-browser and office suite are broken, there’s little to keep many from switching entirely to FLOSS and GNU/Linux. Great news.

UPDATE More on the UK adoption of ODF at The Document Foundation congratulates the UK government for their revolutionary and historical choice of open document standards

  • Jul 22 / 2014
  • 0
technology

Even The Legacy PC Has Lost Its Monopoly In China

The huge lead developed by the legacy PC over more than a decade on the web“Around 527 million (or 83 per cent) of China’s 632 million netizens preferred to use a mobile device to access websites and apps.
Some 81 per cent of those Chinese people who are online browsed the web via a PC; naturally a large number of people used both mobile devices and PCs.”
is shrinking fast. In China, it’s gone.

This is the straw that breaks the camel’s back, the burdens of Wintel on personal IT are huge negatives compared to */Linux on ARM, software and hardware that works for the user and not the monopolists, Intel and M$. While it has been a difficult and slow process to move the legacy PC beyond monopoly, there never was a monopoly for these new small cheap computers. One way or another FLOSS and */Linux will have its day. Consumers are finally getting choice, competition and great price/performance on retail shelves.

See FONDLEMANIA: Mobile devices outstrip PCs on China's internet.

  • Jul 21 / 2014
  • 9
Linux in Education, Teaching, technology

Schools In Geneva Switching To GNU/Linux

“All primary and secondary public schools in the Swiss Canton of Geneva are switching to using Ubuntu GNU/Linux for the PCs used by teachers and students. The switch has been completed by all of the 170 primary public schools, and the migration of the canton’s 20 secondary schools is planned for the next school year. Ubuntu GNU/Linux offers powerful services to the teachers, is easier to maintain, faster, safer and more stable than the decade-old proprietary operating system it is replacing, the canton’s school IT department concludes, based on several four-year long pilots.” These guys took four years studying the matter and it will only take two years to switch their schools to GNU/Linux. It shows the Munich decade was some sort of aberration in terms of time taken to switch. The difference is the number of applications locked in to that other OS. Munich had hundreds. Geneva has only one or two. LibreOffice takes care of one…

Anyway, I think the migration in Geneva is remarkable because the Swiss are thorough. If they could be convinced in just four years, most of the rest of us should be convinced in a matter of hours. Get on with it folks. Take a look at Debian GNU/Linux and see what you’ve been missing: the freedom to use the hardware you own to its maximum capability, freedom from malware and freedom from paying about twice what IT should really cost you. In schools where I used GNU/Linux we easily had twice as much IT for the same cost and the cost of maintaining the larger system was less than the cost of maintaining the smaller system running that other OS. Freedom from the EULA of M$ which enslaves you rather than enabling you is the killer however. With FLOSS and GNU/Linux you can run, examine, modify and distribute the software to your heart’s content. Go with it. Seize the opportunity.

SeeGeneva class-rooms switching to free software | Joinup.

  • Jul 20 / 2014
  • 26
technology

Radical Change In IT

M$’s new CEO wrote, “We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

See Can Nadella's remake Microsoft under his new manifesto?.

His vision of radical change is different from mine. His vision is one of greater lock-in to M$, reaching not only from desktop and mobile thingy but also to our networks and databases and web applications. Mine is one of freedom from M$, every place in IT.

Unless you use FLOSS everywhere, you cannot maximize productivity. Essentially, M$ equates productivity to slavery. The CEO equates productivity for the user to free labour given to M$. Look at it this way. Is your productivity maximized if you agree to do everything with a monopoly? A monopoly is still a monopoly whether or not you consent to deal with it. A monopoly, by definition, forces you to pay what is demanded from a single supplier. That was wrong for the desktop OS. It’s more wrong to do that for all of IT. M$ is out to get you. Escape the trap. Use FLOSS.

Supposedly new-M$ is without the old guard, Gates and Ballmer, but monopoly is still on the mind of its CEO. Face it. You are less productive paying the “M$ tax” whether it’s a bundled cost in hiding to an OEM/retailer or direct to M$ through a myriad of subscriptions and user-fees. You are less productive if you can’t do what you want because of some rule that M$ imposes. You are less productive if the software you use jumps through all kinds of hoops to ensure M$ gets paid. No, the way to increased productivity is through less lock-in to M$ and the only way you can get that is to use FLOSS or to write your own software. Obviously, maximizing productivity means using FLOSS and writing collaboratively only the software not available as FLOSS.

  • Jul 16 / 2014
  • 4
technology

Broken? My Debian GNU/Linux Desktop Is Not Broken

“I didn’t realise just how broken the F/OSS desktop is. The straw that broke the camel’s back was the file manager replacing type-ahead find with a search but (to seemlessly switch metaphor) it turns out I’d been cut a thousand times already. I’m not just on the other side of the fence, I’m several fields away.” This is a strange comment coming from a Debian Developer. I use Debian GNU/Linux for my desktop and it’s not broken. Typeahead works for me but then I use XFCE4 desktop and the Thunar file-manager. So, why is this guy saying he’s going to MacOS because GNOME doesn’t work for him? Wouldn’t it be easier to switch to XFCE4 than to switch to MacOS (having to buy a new machine and all)? Well, he writes that he already had a Mac for work. I guess he didn’t need to buy one but it’s still silly that a Debian Developer feels he needs to stick with GNOME. There are a bunch of desktop environments in Debian GNU/Linux.
task-desktop - Debian desktop environment
task-gnome-desktop - GNOME desktop environment
task-kde-desktop - KDE desktop environment
task-lxde-desktop - LXDE desktop environment
task-telugu-desktop - Telugu desktop
task-telugu-gnome-desktop - Telugu GNOME desktop environment
task-telugu-kde-desktop - Telugu KDE desktop environment
task-xfce-desktop - Xfce desktop environment

The Debian desktop is not broken just because the GNOME desktop is broken. Further, if I need/want to search for stuff, I have a bunch of ways of doing that in Debian. I love to search for data with Swish-e or Recoll and I like to know exactly where to find an icon for my favourite applications.

See jmtd → log → Mac.

See also Bug 680118 – Triggering directory search by type-ahead breaks keyboard navigation

  • Jul 15 / 2014
  • 0
technology

GNU/Linux Acknowledged As Valid Desktop OS In USA

I’ve known it for more than a decade but folks in USA are a bit slow to change… Today, the Vice-president of industry analysis at NPD stated, “Building on last year’s surprising strength, Chrome’s unit strength ahead of this year’s education buying season shows how it has become a legitimate third platform alongside Windows and Mac OS X and iOS”

Of course he’s mostly concerned with unit sales (“For the three weeks ending June 7, Chromebook sales made up more than 40 percent of Commercial Channel notebook sales, a significant bump from the 35 percent year-to-date.”) and I’m on about performance. I’ll grant that 40% share is wonderful but GNU/Linux could have done that years ago with the right OEMs and retailers involved. It took that train a long time to form.

GNU/Linux is a winner for Google in combination with Google’s cloud and browser. Just as M$ did years ago, Google is sweeping competition from the market but this time they are doing it with performance, not exclusive dealing. What a difference FLOSS makes.

See NPD: Chromebooks Lead a Strong First Half for U.S. Commercial Channel PC Sales.

  • Jul 15 / 2014
  • 5
Linux in Education, Teaching, technology

FLOSS Is The Right Way

“a lot of children had never had any examples of programming. They’d used a computer, but in fact the computer had used them. They knew how a mouse worked, they knew how to save a spreadsheet, they knew how to load an XBOX game, but they didn’t necessarily know anything else about computing”I’ve seen this repeatedly, a classroom full of students who “knew how to use PCs” but had no idea how fast they were or of what PCs are capable. I demonstrated a few simple programmes in PASCAL to show them how fast the maths was. Even on decade old machines, hundreds of millions of FLOPS happen. These are computers that are sluggish under the bloat of M$’s software. Put on lean software like GNU/Linux and they fly.

I let them read the GPL and the EULA.txt and jaws dropped. They had no idea that their use of PCs was handicapped by non-Free software. I showed them the power they had with a bit of knowledge of FLOSS, and a screwdriver. They were liberated from needing to depend on the Wintel treadmill and Wintel itself for all aspects of their IT. A decade ago, it seemed every way forward for FLOSS was uphill because of the lock-in. Now young people can buy a small cheap computer with Android/Linux and “root” it and presto! they are free of the Wintel treadmill forever. A billion people have seen the light and it’s possible another billion or more will go to FLOSS this year alone. The world is just beginning this explosive migration away from non-Free software.

See Friends record their call to arms for open source!.

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