Wind, Peas And Shutting Down

I doubt there’s any connection but this afternoon when the temperature had risen a few degrees and the wind was a few clicks lighter I went out to plant my peas and the Toronto Stock Exchange went down for unspecified problems. It really didn’t bother me. I had no trading orders in the queues. The peas didn’t care. The wind bothered me. I wore a sweater and a jacket and was marginally comfortable. The wind blew leaves into my trenches so some peas may not root properly. When I went to water the peas and yesterday’s radishes and onion sets the water blew horizontally requiring weird positioning of the sprinkler. Nevertheless we shall sally forth tomorrow to plant some caraganas. I must do that because these legumes are soaking in water and may sprout too soon if I wait another day.

This wind makes me think I should add some proportion of wind-power to my renewable energy supply for my future Solo EV. That way, I can collect energy even when Sun is not shining on my property. Even 1kW would be useful for charging a big battery.

Other seeds I’ve planted in pots indoors are doing pretty well. Pumpkins are growing like Topsy. Tomatoes are demanding more light. Squash and a few others remain shy. Marigolds are beginning to sprout. By the middle of June I should have a working garden and a stronger stock portfolio.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in food, horticulture, investing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Wind, Peas And Shutting Down

  1. Grece wrote, “The ROI will never be achieved Robert, as with all the other money you waste your pension on, this would be the topping of the cake.”

    That depends on whether the thing will fail in service or last decades. Since it’s drawing on $free energy, eventually it will pay. This week was wonderful if you like wind. Yesterday we had 50km/h wind with 70 km/h gusts. There’s lots of energy in those winds. It wrought havoc on my lawn sprinkling.

  2. Grece says:

    The ROI will never be achieved Robert, as with all the other money you waste your pension on, this would be the topping of the cake.

  3. Grece wrote, “You only average 10 kts at best a year, hardly worthy of such an investment.”

    I don’t intend to generate much power at 10 kts but the peaks are wonderful. Much of today is going to be 30km/h. We just had many days where peaks were 40-50km/h and the average was about 30km/h. Stuff was blowing in my eyes. Leaves were getting in the way of seeding. Soil was blowing away if dry and disturbed. It’s a shame to waste that energy when a few dollars can collect some of it. When I was a boy in the “pre-electrification” days, every farm had a wind turbine to charge lead-acid batteries and many had wind turbines to pump water. It may not break even very quickly but an investment in wind is a good idea. Manitoba Hydro has been investing in wind farms for a long time and saving money. I will have a battery for solar storage. Why not inject a little wind into that battery? I know how to merge DC sources electronically. It’s trivial when using switching technology.

  4. oiaohm wrote, “the average really does not display the problem. 10kts average wind is still in the range of possible profitable but it requires being in areas where you get insanely still days with days of high wind.”

    Yes, we have calm days but we are having a whole week where the minimum is about 20km/h. I’ve avoided going out in the morning the last few days because I would just get chilled even wearing a sweater and jacket to do gardening. We also get some cloudy days but also many sunny days. What I like about wind is that we often get nights where the wind blows enough to top up the car or the battery. Wind is less reliable than Sun but it can be available any time of the day or year. Sun shrinks a lot in these northern climes in winter but is fantastic in summer. We get a few winter storms but an awful lot of windy days in spring when warm southern air mixes with cold northern air. Wind is forecast to be 20-30km/h from 1000 this morning to 0500 tomorrow. It’s a shame to let all that energy go to waste. It’s a little more expensive per kW but I value the flexibility and a small wind turbine doesn’t cost much.

  5. oiaohm says:

    https://otherpower.com/bottom_line.html
    Grece 10kts for year average that turns out to be average for where lot of commercial wind turbines are deployed. But those areas would not be like Canada. 10kts might be the average but you will have like many days of 20 to 30kts then days of nothing that pull the average back down to 10kts..

    I do think where Robert is max wind speed is not going to be that great and where he is will have a more constant min wind speed most likely just under what can operate a wind turbine.

    Grece you are on the right track that the amount of wind power is low. But the average really does not display the problem. 10kts average wind is still in the range of possible profitable but it requires being in areas where you get insanely still days with days of high wind.

    You really do need the wind curve of the area to know if it suitable for wind turbine. 5kts is about the lowest speed a turbine will even work.

    So how many days have making up the 10kts average have a 4.9kts where most wind turbine will not work this is why you need the curve. To start working how what percentage of the 10kts average wind speed power will not be collectible at all. Even from 4.9 to 10kts speeds a lot of turbines at not that effective. So you are looking 11kts+ wind speeds as good generation days on the curve.

    In the Beaufort scale Moderate breeze and Fresh breeze days are the ones you are counting as goodish generation days. There are areas that their wind speeds are either Calm or Moderate breeze and Fresh breeze with almost no time spent in the wind speed of poor generation.

    Really is the number of days that will produce absolutely zero from either being too slow for turbine or too fast so the turbine has to feather out of the wind are the deciding factor if a turbine should or should not be deployed.

    Most areas on earth have a high enough wind average for wind turbines problem is the average if you start using that to compare to where wind turbines have been deployed to work out if it will be cost effective where you are will lead you into failure.

    Limited areas have the wind pattern that can be effectively harvested and give a return. Its the wind pattern I don’t think Robert will have. Yes you can have areas with yearly average wind speeds of 20-30 kts and it also not be effective place for wind turbines due to low days and really high days that you cannot collect power on.

    Wind turbines don’t get along that well with snow and ice either.

  6. Grece says:

    So now its a wind turbine Robert? You only average 10 kts at best a year, hardly worthy of such an investment.

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