Crime And Self-Inflicted Punishment

“To create the false 2016 P&L, on or about October 21, 2016, Manafort emailed Gates a .pdf version of the real 2016 DMI P&L, which showed a loss of more than $600,000. Gates converted that .pdf into a “Word” document so that it could be edited, which Gates sent back to Manafort. Manafort altered that “Word” document by adding more than $3.5 million in income. He then sent this falsified P&L to Gates and asked that the “Word” document be converted back to a .pdf, which Gates did and returned to Manafort. Manafort then sent the falsified 2016 DMI P&L .pdf to Lender D.”
 
See Paul Manafort couldn’t convert PDFs to Word documents.
Sheesh! It has been stated that smart people use GNU/Linux and stupid people are locked in to That Other OS. This could be another example of that phenomenon. Trump shouted to the world that the folks in power were “stupid” and he would hire the smartest people to run things… He lied…

Trump actually hired as manager of his election campaign a guy who could not convert formats of documents. Instead, these criminals shared files by e-mail creating a trail for Mueller to follow, oh, and yes, one of them flipped and will testify against the other…

One has to wonder why Trump hired all these guys with connections to Russia who were up to their necks in illegal practices… Could it be that Trump was doing much the same? Further, why did Manafort join Trump’s campaign? Was it because his Russian masters wanted that to happen? Perhaps Trump’s Russian managers suggested the hiring. 2018 should be a very good year for those who want to know.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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56 Responses to Crime And Self-Inflicted Punishment

  1. Grece says:

    No one cares! This blog is for bashing Robert and his silly ideas, that never bear fruit.

  2. jonathan6061 says:

    In my last post, “1990’s” should be “1990s.” No apostrophe after the “s.” And when I say “Linux,” I mean “GNU / Linux.” I’ve tried Puppy Linux, Slackware Linux, Mandriva Linux, Kubuntu Linux, Ubuntu, and (my current distro) Ubuntu MATE. They are all fun to operate!

  3. jonathan6061 says:

    For more than a year I had been dual-booting Linux Mint and Windows 10 on my Toshiba laptop, and for some reason, Windows deleted (or did something to) a few of my apps on both OS’s! I have always enjoyed Linux since my first time using it in 2007. No hassles, quick and dependable, no surprise updates or system requirements after booting up or before shutting down! Linux is *user friendly* and truly *user controlled.* I do admit that Windows has come a long ways since its “3.1” days, and that’s a lot to look back on. Windows 3.11 was a headache for me to use the first time (1990’s), but I joined the millions of other Americans who became “cybercitizens.” Which brings me into the future of 2018:

    February 2018: I suspected that Windows uninstalled three apps on both OS’s. This is the second time that I’ve run into compatibility issues with Windows running alongside Linux. I’m not a geek or “whiz,” but this is the second computer that I’ve owned to encounter missing programs after installing Linux. This time, I have decided to erase Windows forever and let Linux make a new home on the entire drive. Mission accomplished! I’m enjoying every minute of my computing experience! The only problem I’ve noticed is a long boot time, which is a minor inconvenience; once the system is up, the response times are fast and the performance is great. LibreOffice may not be acceptable to everyone, but I prefer it over MS Office any day. The customization and user control built into Linux is, in my book, still one step ahead of Windows. The Linux kernel is beautiful, especially in GUI. I long for the day when most of the business world will embrace Linux and give users the freedom to choose and enjoy.

  4. kurkosdr says:

    It always amazes me that the same FOSSies who were advertising Desktop Linux’s ability to give a second life to old PCs and prolong the life of the hardware blame Windows for NOT imposing a planned obsolescence cycle on PCs like the one Android/Linux imposes on phones.

    Because Pog, even a senile old man can go statcounter and see that PC usage is not declining, at least not significantly. What is declining is the need to replace perfectly functional PCs from 2011 and onwards, which is why PC sales are falling. Meanwhile, Google deep-sixed my LG Optimus 2X (2011) by cutting out support for Play Services, so even apps that had been previously purchased on the phone stop working because they need latest Play Services to authenticate (plus lack of support for security patches, which a 2011 PC still gets). And this is why so many Android phones are sold.

  5. Ivan says:

    Try the simplest possible piece of “paper-based” (as opposed to photography — I have to qualify this, otherwise you’d nit-pick pointlessly) artistic creation — an XKCD comic strip. It is, for all practical purposes, impossible.

    Nah. Phablet, stylus, any sketchboard app, and the old man could do a poorly drawn web comic. But why would he want to? Doing that would get in the way of day dreaming about a car he’ll never get or whining about the President of a country he is not a citizen of.

  6. DrLoser says:

    I suppose, coming late to the game, I should address the OP.

    It has been stated that smart people use GNU/Linux and stupid people are locked in to That Other OS.

    Quoting your own words (assuming that even you were passive-aggressive enough to make this claim verbatim) doesn’t actually qualify as a point of discussion, Robert.

    Give us a link. After all, “it has been stated.” Who knows the source of this statement?

    Confucius? Karl Marx? Bill Gates? Katy Perry?

    Do please share the context of this rather outre statement with us. I mean, 95% of people don’t care either way (assuming a die-hard and indeed not necessarily technical Linux base of 5% … which I am assuming purely for the current purpose). Surely whoever came out with a quote like this should either be revered as a God, or else quoted incessantly as a misunderstood prophet?

    Or, and here’s my thinking on this particular point: you’re absolutely jam-packed full of it again, aren’t you, Robert?

  7. DrLoser says:

    Any update on this 50+% of your friends and acquaintances who no longer use a PC, Robert?

    No?

    I thought not.

  8. DrLoser says:

    You’ve obviously never seen TLW in action. She doesn’t do casual or hasty. Every shot is a production worthy of Hollywood.

    And bravo to your Good Woman. Who would almost certainly not describe her photography as either “creative” or “productive.” In fact, I’ll bet the first word she’ll use is “fun.”

    You have never really had much “fun” in your life, have you, Robert? I’d give it a go if I were you.

    But, back to Hollywood. Interesting you should mention Hollywood. Hollywood is (on its better days) both creative and productive. You want to know how Hollywood is creative and productive?

    Hollywood movies spend about 5% of their time in the sheer mechanics of point-n-shoot (and they don’t trouble themselves with Android devices even at this level), and 95% of their time on CGI, editing, image enhancement, merging sequences, and stuff that …

    Cannot be done on a mobile phone.

    Pick another daft exemplar out of your utter profundity of technical ignorance, Robert. This one clearly does not work.

  9. Deaf Spy says:

    I’ve been doing photography since the 1960s.

    Yeah, and you’ve been doing programming since 1960s, too. Then we come to see your Pascal code and there is a gust of laughter.

    Now, now. Taking a picture is perfectly possible with a camera with zero smart functions. Lets go back to actual productivity, shall we?

    Again. Write me an e-mail of about 3,000 words, with formatted, colored and highlighted text on your smartphone while enjoying CNN.

    Or better. Do a project plan with milestones, resource allocation and a Gantt-like chart in Excel.

  10. DrLoser wrote, ” Photography is a creative art…
     
    Let’s start with that. No, it isn’t.”

    I’ve been doing photography since the 1960s. There is a lot of science and technology involved but the stupid gadget doesn’t get to choose the subject nor the lighting nor the exposure nor the focus. Some cameras give more control and some less but there can be no end of art to photography.

    See, for example, The Art of Photography.

    I am not a great artist but I’ve taken a few wonderful photographs, mostly black and white in the old days with a 35mm SLR. I really enjoyed film and developed my own but the modern digital camera frees one from a lot of the work of photography and leaves room for the art.

  11. Deaf Spy wrote, “This is just taking snapshots, quick and dirty way”.

    You’ve obviously never seen TLW in action. She doesn’t do casual or hasty. Every shot is a production worthy of Hollywood.

  12. DrLoser says:

    The original source says:

    Don’t confuse Robert by following up his links, Deaf Spy. It’s not something he ever does himself. And I’ve never once see him accept a counter-point made by somebody else, and then follow up the argument.

    Mr Pogson was a conspiracy-theory nutter before conspiracy-theory nutters were even invented. Looking back at ten years of this blog, he seems to have invented “False News” all by himself, which is a magnificent achievement considering his very limited intellectual or persuasive abilities.

    A salutary example of why we should never simply label people as “left” or “right” wing, but simply ignore them when they continually talk abject nonsense. And here I stress: even if we find ourselves preconditioned to accept that abject nonsense.

  13. DrLoser says:

    At her age, and with her numerous social connections, that’s what productivity looks like.

    I like how you have to qualify your Good Lady’s activities with a couple of throat clearings, Robert. I’m sure “TLW” appreciates the “bigly” of it all.

    Nevertheless, it isn’t being creative. And your wife, being a thousand times smarter than you are, would never claim it as being creative. And it isn’t even “being productive.” Being “productive” is what real computer systems (yes, even servers based on Linux!) do.

    What your wife is doing here is not being “productive” so much as “communicating with her friends.” There’s nothing wrong with this — indeed, it is laudable — but to label it as “productive” is a reductio ad absurdum too far. Here’s a direct equivalence, Robert: you, presumably, like all of us, avail yourself of the sewage system. Your daily regimen in that respect is “productive.” It benefits you and it benefits sewage workers.

    But in terms of the economy, you really wouldn’t want to describe it as “being productive,” now, would you? I mean, one more, or one less, Robert Pogson sitting on his toilet is hardly going to shift the overall happiness of mankind one way or the other, is it?

    You’re full of it, btw. Which, given the counter-argument you are about to present, probably makes you about the most productive digestive tract in Manitoba.

  14. DrLoser says:

    You really are an utter buffoon, aren’t you, Robert?

    Photography is a creative art…

    Let’s start with that. No, it isn’t. As mediated by a smart-phone camera, or indeed a $5,000 bit of professional gear, it involves pointing the thing and whacking your thumb or other appendage against a button. (More effort is required with a Nikon, but I wouldn’t expect you to know that.) The creative bit comes later, with post-processing and so on, and … wouldn’t you know it? … you need an actual computer to do that.

    Keep whacking away with those wizened old fat thumbs of yours, O Wannabe Creative One.

    I notice that, as usual, you feebly tried to side-step all Deaf Spy’s other points but … wait! What is this! You didn’t even manage to side-step the “creative” thing! What an unusual surprise!

    Try creating an engineering drawing on a smart-phone, Robert. I’ll save you the trouble of upgrading from your $50 piece o’ crap — you can’t do it. Try creating a short story — possible, but ludicrously difficult, and you’d be concentrating on manipulating the phone, not on the short story. Try the simplest possible piece of “paper-based” (as opposed to photography — I have to qualify this, otherwise you’d nit-pick pointlessly) artistic creation — an XKCD comic strip. It is, for all practical purposes, impossible.

    And all this, before you bother your lazy old mind to contemplate Deaf Spy’s other two objections to your argument of practical equivalence. I’ll guarantee you won’t get around to rebutting either of those two points. First, because there is no possible rebuttal. And second, because even if there were, you are far too ignorant about the technological alternatives to have any worthwhile opinion whatsoever.

  15. Deaf Spy says:

    “TLW has some nasty little Android/Linux device and she goes to some social event, takes a hundred pictures, posts a few to FB and spreads the joy.”

    equals to

    “People use smart phones and tablets to text, write a short post on their favorite social network”

    Photography is a creative art and TLW, my kids and I all do photography almost exclusively with a smartphone these days

    This is just taking snapshots, quick and dirty way, and is as distant from professional photography as it a pimple-ridden twelve-year old from undoing his first bra.

    Even I send most of my e-mails from the smartphone while watching CNN roll by

    This speaks volumes about the quality of your content.

    Some minutes ago I finished writing an e-mail concerning the functional analysis phase of a CRM for shipping insurance underwriting about entry and export of financial information to the account software. My e-mail was about 3000 words, formatted with font styles and colors, plus a small screenshot.

    Please, do something similar on your phone while having CNN rolling by. 🙂

    Your life is simple, Robert, and that is nice for you. Others are not so fortunate and use desktop computers.

  16. Deaf Spy wrote, “Everything else – working on documents, writing e-mails, creative work – these all happen exclusively on a desktop.”

    Nonsense. Check out Apple’s ads. Check out Google’s aps. E-mail? Give me a break. Even I send most of my e-mails from the smartphone while watching CNN roll by. Photography is a creative art and TLW, my kids and I all do photography almost exclusively with a smartphone these days. Smartphones have quite a few settings, effects and composition tools for cameras these days. You should try one.

  17. Deaf Spy wrote, “The only smartphone that is remotely capable of being really productive is the now defunct Lumia 950(XL)”.

    Nonsense. TLW has some nasty little Android/Linux device and she goes to some social event, takes a hundred pictures, posts a few to FB and spreads the joy. At her age, and with her numerous social connections, that’s what productivity looks like. She also does that from her desktop after the pix have been uploaded to the server but she doesn’t need that step. That’s for long term storage/archiving. She does that when some conversation goes as “Remember when… ?” or she wants to make a special presentation. Oh, yes, some of the pix involve real estate…

  18. Deaf Spy says:

    Now, Robert, hark! I have a tough question to you.

    What categories do 2-in-1s fall into – desktop or tablet?

    Some devices that fall into this category: Surface Pro, Book, Lenovo Yoga, Dell Inspiron 5000 series, etc., etc.

    P.S. The only smartphone that is remotely capable of being really productive is the now defunct Lumia 950(XL).

  19. Deaf Spy says:

    54% of those 18-34 years of age used a desktop/notebook to access the Internet. Quite a few do not.

    The original source says:
    ” 41 per cent of Canadian Internet users between 18 and 34 report using a mobile phone to access the Internet most often” (emphasis mine).

    Most often doesn’t translate to “always”.

    Robert, are you developing reading comprehension deficiencies? Or are you just lying?

    It is very simple, Robert. People use smart phones and tablets to text, write a short post on their favorite social network, read something, watch something, listen to something, and perhaps write an occasional urgent e-mail.

    Everything else – working on documents, writing e-mails, creative work – these all happen exclusively on a desktop.

  20. Grece says:

    Keep on with this line of thinking Robert, your doubling-down just reinforces to us how ignorant you really are, and to top it off, this report even confirms it.

    ABSTRACT Our smartphones enable—and encourage—constant connection to information, entertainment, and each other. They put the world at our fingertips, and rarely leave our sides. Although these devices have immense potential to improve welfare, their persistent presence may come at a cognitive cost. In this research, we test the “brain drain” hypothesis that the mere presence of one’s own smartphone may occupy limited-capacity cognitive resources, thereby leaving fewer resources available for other tasks and undercutting cognitive performance. Results from two experiments indicate that even when people are successful at maintaining sustained attention—as when avoiding the temptation to check their phones—the mere presence of these devices reduces available cognitive capacity. Moreover, these cognitive costs are highest for those highest in smartphone dependence. We conclude by discussing the practical implications of this smartphone-induced brain drain for consumer decision-making and consumer welfare

    https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/691462

  21. Grece says:

    RRobert, everyone uses a smartphone to access the Internet, just as EVERYONE uses a desktop/laptop with Windows to access the Internet.

  22. See Internet use in Canada

    54% of those 18-34 years of age used a desktop/notebook to access the Internet. Quite a few do not.

  23. DrLoser says:

    “In the Year of Whatever, Pew reported ….”

    “TLW hardly uses [sc. ‘whilst her husband looms over her’] a PC any more.”

    More stupid side-steps, Robert. Stop evading the consequent requirement of your original thesis, which as I recall dealt with “the majority of the people I know.” A paraphrase because I can’t be bothered to look it up. Whatever. The burden of proof is the same.

    Go out and canvas these people, and come back with actual results. Not some farcical projection from a self-selected link, which as Deaf Spy pointed out doesn’t actually prove your thesis in any case.

    Be honest. You live in a First World country. Your neighbors and friends have all, at some stage in the last five years, been able to afford a $400 home computer (aka a PC). Which population, as Grece says, will be roughly 20% OSX and 80% MS Windows.

    Go out and count them. And don’t whine that “they’re just not important any more.” Because these people own PCs. And not being a swivel-eyed maniac like you, they make use of them.

    Incidentally, I too suffer with the same problems of fading eyesight and fat fingers and annoying link-clicks and so on when it comes to using a smart phone. I have found a solution! Hallelujah!

    Use a PC with a workable OS like Windows, you tremulous presbyopterous dimwit!

  24. Deaf Spy wrote, “Usage of laptop / desktop computers is basically a flat line for the last decade, meaning these devices are not going anywhere, they are here to stay.”

    Old people like me are here to stay until we’re not. Why is an essential element of modern life flat-lining when every other indicator shows growth? PCs are becoming museum pieces in most homes. TLW rarely uses one here. I could get by with a smartphone except I need a larger screen and more precise pointing. My clumsy fingers keep doing strange things to my smartphone like clicking a link instead of landing somewhere else. Perhaps a table would suit me better. The other need for a PC is storage. PCs are just more flexible but a server can do that. There’s no need for a powerful PC on every desk. They are obsolescent if they ever were needed in homes.

  25. Deaf Spy says:

    Robert, you never cease to amaze me how you manage to provide data that proves other people’s thesis.

    Usage of laptop / desktop computers is basically a flat line for the last decade, meaning these devices are not going anywhere, they are here to stay. Regardless of the growth of smart thingies, desktops enjoy a solid presence.

    Now, your puny points:

    “TLW’s machine was replaced with a tiny ARMed box.”
    Who cares, it is still a desktop.

    “Beast will be changed sooner or later. The other PC we have is already an aged Atom and will go to ARM.

    Two “will”s and no “was”.

    Come one, Robert. You can’t even turn your home away from desktops and to smart thingies. Dear, you can’t even turn it to an ARM desktop environment.

  26. Grece says:

    Beast will be changed sooner or later.

    Definitely NOT with ARM, that’s for sure.

  27. Grece says:

    So are you saying that people that have/use smartphones, totally disregard the use of a desktop/laptop computer?

  28. In 2015, Pew reported ~73% of individuals had a PC. The percentage decreased with age and year. The high point was around 2010-2011. In 2018, Pew reports the level of desktop/notebook ownership has barely changed. With the decreased sales that means the owned machines are getting pretty old and may not be replaced. TLW’s machine was replaced with a tiny ARMed box. Beast will be changed sooner or later. The other PC we have is already an aged Atom and will go to ARM. Meanwhile ownership of smartphones by youngsters is near 100%. That’s for USA. I doubt Canadians are as wasteful.

  29. Grece says:

    Out of 100 acquaintances, 80 will be Windows users, the other 20 will be MacOS.

  30. DrLoser says:

    No comment on what “the majority” of your acquaintances use for computing purposes, I see, Robert.

    That’s actually where you are lying, I claim. And my claim is reinforced by your stupid and irrelevant side-step.

    I hereby offer you the chance to refute my claim. Let’s say you have 100 acquaintances who need some sort of computer. (Just phoning friends on a Nokia doesn’t count.)

    Go on, canvas them. At least 50 will have a PC. Canvas them. Tell us.

    Put up, or shut up.

  31. kurkosdr says:

    Pog, my dear Pog, all those Android/Linux devices are appliances much like a Samsung SmartTV is. Yet you count them as competitors to the PC. Where does TLW go when she needs to do stuff like edit documents or photos? Answer: A desktop. If the Desktop was dying, investors wouldn’t drop massive amounts of moolah in AMD to design a new microarchitecture… But what do they know? They should take advice from Pog and deliver that ARM board with the massive PCI-E bus he was dreaming of. There is a potential market of 3 cheapskate DIYers there.

  32. Deaf Spy says:

    There is no explanation except that homes have fewer PCs these days.

    Hm, what about the simple fact that PCs last more years due to the reduced demand on CPU power, storage and RAM?
    For the last 7-8 year most users are perfectly fine with two cores, 4gb ram, and 500gb storage. Then, PCs are much more durable than a smart thingie that barely lasts 2 years.

    You personally claim your Beast is still working for you. Then, what does GDP have to do with it?

  33. DrLoser wrote, “You lie, Robert. You lie.”

    Let’s see. In it’s prime, the desktop PC shipped ~370million units annually. In 2017, it was 259million. Has anyone noticed a decline in population, GDP, computation, etc. that would account for such a decline? There is no explanation except that homes have fewer PCs these days. Homes are awash in smartphones though as those provide what people need. I don’t know about your home but mine used to have multiple desktop PCs. A couple of us even had multiple PCs. Now there are only 3 in the house and one is rarely used. Only one of my three children has a desktop PC. Another has a notebook. They all have smartphones.

  34. DrLoser says:

    But let’s be fair, Robert. Deaf Spy is obviously wrong on systemd.

    As I recall, you once essentially branded it as the Devil’s Spawn, and totally unusable. And then (much as with several of your other mentally-challenged obsessions, for example UEFI) you suddenly realised you could live with it. In the case of systemd it — surprise! How come we never told you! — actually makes your life easier!

    I infer this matter of “makes your life easier” based upon the fact that you haven’t publicly wet your pants on this blog whilst complaining that you are too senile to cope with a declarative language and set-up methodology. I may well be wrong. Well, which is it?

    Are you prepared to admit that systemd was actually a fine idea, or do you still have issues that for some reason you have kept to yourself for the last couple of years or so?

  35. DrLoser says:

    I’m guessing you know around 100 people, Robert. Whether or not they will admit to associating with you is irrelevant here.

    TLW only uses a desktop a few percent of the time.

    So many questions as to what “a few” and “observed” mean … but let’s leave that to one side. That’s one per cent of the people you know who are tyrannised by your silly obsession. Leaving 99 more bottles on the wall.

    Are you seriouslysuggesting that at least 50 of those 99 people don’t actually ever use a PC? (With or without Windows, OSX or Linux, in approximate order of worldwide OS.)

    Are you?

    Are you nuts? Do you take us for credulous fools?

    You lie, Robert. You lie.

  36. Deaf Spy wrote, “Even TLW gets her work done on a classic desktop, not on a toy that is for browsing and watching a video.”

    TLW only uses a desktop a few percent of the time. She mostly uses it for managing thousands of images and a few documents. Everything else is done with web-applications on an Android/Linux smartphone. If the desktop disappeared she could probably manage just fine with Google Docs and a file/database server plus the web.

  37. Deaf Spy says:

    The desktop is becoming irrelevant.

    Yeah, of course, move the goalpost.

    Actually, you are almost right, but still wrong. Right, because the desktop is becoming irrelevant but only in the form that you know it. In reality, desktop is evolving. Touch is becoming a requirement, but coupled with a keyboard and a touchpad / mouse. 2-in-1s are a hit.

    In this new world, Windows is kind. Even iOS is falling behind, because Apple still can’t get touch on their MacBooks.

    Most of the people I know don’t own one but they run iOS or Android/Linux on a smartphone or tablet.

    How many people who actually work on a computer do you know, Robert? Even TLW gets her work done on a classic desktop, not on a toy that is for browsing and watching a video.

    Btw, Windows 10 evolved quite nicely in its support for touch-based experience. For example, it knows when you long-tapped the screen and when you right-clicked your mouse. Then it renders the context menu differently, optimized for the appropriate interaction.

    Come back when Linux or even Android gets capable of something as simple as that.

  38. The Wiz wrote, “Linux as a desktop os is 1.43%”.

    Europe has >2%. I guess they are smarter than average. The desktop is becoming irrelevant. Most of the people I know don’t own one but they run iOS or Android/Linux on a smartphone or tablet.

  39. Wizard emiritus says:

    As usual Robert Pogson talks about statistics the are irrelevant to the discussion. You can see this if you change the view on statcounters page to desktop market share… surprise surprise Linux as a desktop os is 1.43%

  40. Grece says:

    Come now Robert that’s Android users, NOT Desktop Linux users.

    How much you want to bet that 80% of Android users use Windows?

  41. deaf Spy wrote, “No one uses Linux (< 2%)".

    Statcounter says over 40% use “Linux”… I guess the rest of Spy’s comments are fake too.

  42. Deaf Spy says:

    Stats are proving:
    1) No one uses Linux (< 2%), and Robert's predictions how Linux will grow turned false.
    2) ChromeOS is still lurking < 1%. Considering the new generation of Windows-powered ARM chips, the boom of 2-in-1s (Windows again), and Windows S for schools and universities, ChromeOS is going nowhere. Another Robert's prediction bites the dust.

    Calling people "stupid" for using Windows when you:
    1) Can't cope with systemd and set properly your WiFi on all your devices,
    2) Don't even know how to support Windows,
    3) Think you can build a home server with a toy DYI ARM board that never sees the light, and
    4) Think will get your Solo in 2018
    is waaaay too insolent. 🙂

  43. Grece says:

    Regarding the line, “It has been stated that smart people use GNU/Linux and stupid people are locked in to That Other OS., who states such a thing Robert?

    In reality, over 80% of desktop users use “That Other OS” and so in your feeble brain, anyone that uses Windows is stupid??

    http://gs.statcounter.com/os-market-share/desktop/worldwide/#monthly-201712-201712-bar

  44. Ivan says:

    These days, Russia is propping up tyrants in Syria, Ukraine and North Korea and still trying to kill ‘mericans.

    Much better than repatriating ISIS members or inviting convicted terrorists to a party for Trudope just to prove you’re not still the racists shitbags we know you to be.

  45. Grece says:

    A little research? Income tax returns?

    Jesus Christ Robert, are you eff’n dense? Manafort was indicted for tax-evasion, so how in the hell would Trump, or anyone else for that matter, gain any salient knowledge from Manafort’s returns when Manafort did not report anything?

    Please explain yourself.

  46. Grece says:

    Trump got what he wanted, Putin’s operatives in the White House.

    Evidence Robert?

  47. kurkosdr wrote, “Why is Russia an enemy of the US anyway?”

    Oh, because USA got a sweet deal over Alaska, USA took sides in the uncivil war in Russia after 1917, Russia killed a lot of the friends of USA, and Russia killed ‘mericans during the not so cold war. These days, Russia is propping up tyrants in Syria, Ukraine and North Korea and still trying to kill ‘mericans.

  48. kurkosdr says:

    Trump got what he wanted, Putin’s operatives in the White House.

    Why is Russia an enemy of the US anyway? Just because Hilary and the Deep State wanted Russia to be? Is Russia being aggressive against the US or any of the allies? No. Meanwhile China is threatening the territorial sovereignty of Japan but they are supposedly “friends” of the US. And the Dems even want to impose binding CO2 caps on US businesses while Chinese businesses won’t have any.

  49. ram says:

    I used to work at a high level government classified research facility. Everyone there was a spy, for one side or the other 😉

    Some things change, some things never do.

  50. Grece wrote, “how is Trump able to know Manaforts prior actions?”

    A little research? Income tax returns? A billionaire can afford to be careful, eh? Nope. Trump got what he wanted, Putin’s operatives in the White House.

  51. Grece says:

    Grece offers no explanation for why Trump hired so many people on the Russian payroll and with so many criminal charges pending.

    I shouldn’t have to explain anything, all the transgressions performed were before Trump was even elected.

    Manafort was just indicted, so tell us Robert, sans a criminal record of any type, how is Trump able to know Manaforts prior actions?

  52. Grece offers no explanation for why Trump hired so many people on the Russian payroll and with so many criminal charges pending. Trumpism is looking more like organized crime every day. Perhaps disorganized would be a better word but definitely crime is involved. They are all in it up to their eyeballs. If Trump isn’t in cahoots with Putin Putin certainly must have some serious dirt on Trump. Trump is running out of defences on Twitter. He’s going to have to bomb Moscow to convince anyone there’s no collusion and then Putin will spill the beans. Stay tuned. Syria is heating up again. I’ll bet Trump will close down Syrian airspace or clobber armour and artillery to show how much he loves the little children. Putin will push back on Corporal Bone-spurs. Justice will be swift if Putin’s cyber-army dumps Twitter full of dirt on Trump or e-mails every news-outlet in the world with the full story. Putin has nothing to lose. Trump has everything to lose. Putin will seem a hero to his electors for tricking the high and mighty Trump. Trump will be a lying loser as he always has been. He’ll be lucky if he’s allowed to retire outside of prison. The Trump family will turn state’s evidence so fast heads will spin.

  53. Grece says:

    Hyperbole Robert.

    You know, that would make an excellent fictional book to sell, your over active imagination should be put to better use.

  54. Grece wrote, “What happened to RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA?”

    Russia maintains a string of puppets around the world. In this case it looks like this:
    Putin sends money to Ukraine where a puppet hired Manafort to do dirty work and who hid the money in Cyprus. The money in Cyprus was laundered into USA via loans for real estate fraudulently obtained as late as 2016. So, there was an active criminal working both for Putin and Trump in 2016. Besides the crime of money laundering it was a serious breach of good sense and national security to have Manafort working with Trump. Where are the good smart people Trump promised? Where’s the “America first” ethic? The only reason I can conceive for Trump to hire Manafort was that Trump was doing much the same and wanted like-thinking traitors surrounding him thinking that another traitor would not spill the beans and self-incriminate. Mueller is peeling this rotten onion. Expect a series of pardons real soon now or a breakthrough in peace with Russia allowing Trump Air to bring the Trumps back to Mother Russia in 2018.

  55. Grece says:

    Tax and money laundering from five – ten years ago, but alas no collusion charges? Have you even read the indictment Robert?

    What happened to RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA RUSSIA?

    So far, Mueller’s case against Manafort has nothing whatsoever to do with the Russia investigation that he was commissioned for, so then, the DOJ should take it over, because it’s clearly OUTSIDE of the jurisdiction of the special counsel. Moreover, Donald Trump’s name or collusion is nowhere to be found in this indictment.

    https://www.justice.gov/file/1038391/download

  56. kurkosdr says:

    I can have access to any document format you have Pog, in fact I have LibreOffice installed on my Windows computer. Where does GNU/Linux stick on to this?

    Are governments corrupt for not mandating the use of open standards across the whole chain? Yes. Are governments corrupt for approving OOXML as an open standard without any reference implementation (available at the source code level under a shared source or open source license)? Yes. Does the choice of OS is in any way related to what is an application level issue? No. Especially considering you can have LibreOffice on Windows and Softmaker Office on GNU/Linux. Are the sounds coming out of Pog’s mouth of equal merit argument-wise than the ones coming out of his capacious rear end? Most definitely.

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