Oh Oh! The EV Game Is About To Change!

See An In Vivo Formed Solid Electrolyte Surface Layer Enables Stable Plating of Li MetalOMG! A simple yet effective redesign of lithium ion galvanic cells has been demonstrated giving much higher performance. If this works in EVs, it’s a game-changer, total freedom from “range-anxiety”.

With my Solo EV, I’m not too concerned about range except in winter. I can plan trips well within the published range of its batteries over most of the prairie region of Canada with existing public charging stations. If the range were suddenly multiplied, EVs would be a “no-brainer”. They would have about the same range as gas-guzzlers without the worry of driving a fuel-truck in traffic. Unfortunately, it will likely take a few years to make this technology widely available but I expect EV-makers will jump on this opportunity.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to Oh Oh! The EV Game Is About To Change!

  1. DrLoser says:

    I was using K12LTSP when it was derived from RedHat around 2003/4. You can probably dig out the version from that.

    Not my job — your job.

    But, hey, let’s not even bother to discuss what little help SSH did you back then. Or indeed now. You appear to have no interest whatsoever into delving into how SSH might somehow benefit your LAN.

    Let me just ask you this single question, Robert. Do you consider thirteen or fourteen years to qualify as “decades/”

    You probably do. You are an ignorant fool with no concept of abstract mathematics, let alone how to add up. So, I’ll give you this option: ask TLW whether 13 years qualifies as “decades.”

    She won’t laugh in your face. She never has. But she’ll laugh behind your back. I suspect she has been (rightly) doing that for “decades.”

  2. DrLoser wrote, “which was the first version of SSH you used? I’d be very surprised indeed if it predates 2006.”

    See https://distrowatch.com/index-mobile.php?distribution=k12linux

    I was using K12LTSP when it was derived from RedHat around 2003/4. You can probably dig out the version from that.

  3. DrLoser wrote, “You didn’t specify how the use of SSH makes a single iota of difference around your household network.”

    Uh? Using SSH I can control every machine without leaving my chair, run apps remotely and move stuff around like backups or the latest release of FireFox.

  4. DrLoser says:

    I’ve been using SSH for decades.

    No you haven’t, you miserable senile old man. Go on, tell us: which was the first version of SSH you used? I’d be very surprised indeed if it predates 2006.

    Now, on to the other questions, which as usual you ducked like the miserable little work you are.

    1) You didn’t specify how the use of SSH makes a single iota of difference around your household network. It doesn’t, does it? (I assume you trust your immediate family, btw. God knows why they would even listen to your ignorant babbling, let alone trust you.)

    2) Let’s be honest about this. When TLW escapes your intellectually challenged clutches, say, for example, on her trips to the real estate office (good to know that at least somebody in the family is gainfully employed) or her trips abroad, she takes a Windows laptop with her. You’ve admitted this before. Has anything changed?

    Oh, and you can shut your stupid gobby hypocritical little mouth when it comes to “saving the planet” and “going green,” until:

    1) Your wife swaps the SUV for something like a Nissan Leaf.
    2) You miraculously get a delivery of the nonce tricycle, and even more miraculously pay for it.

    Neither of those two things are going to happen any time soon, are they?

  5. Deaf Spy wrote, “this basically means your local network at home is unsecured”.

    No it doesn’t. Because my car can drive on a two-lane or four-lane highway does not mean I can’t drive it on a dirt track across the pasture. Using SSH is one of the layers of security on my network.

  6. Deaf Spy says:

    “Secure Shell (SSH) is a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network”

    (Emphasis mine)

    Well, this basically means your local network at home is unsecured. Good job! 🙂

  7. DrLoser wrote, “BTW — it’s not “good” for controlling computers. It’s not even “good” for transferring data. It’s just a protocol”.

    “Secure Shell (SSH) is a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network. The best known example application is for remote login to computer systems by users.”

    See SSH

    I guess he’s had too many drinks already, rendering him foolish and ignorant. I’ve been using SSH for decades. I know what it can do for security and building secure clusters of machines.

  8. DrLoser says:

    SSH is just one of many layers of security here. It’s also good for controlling computers remotely or transferring data.

    I ask again, therefore. Unless you are a paranoid delusional incompetent moron, most of which you clearly are, Robert — why would you see SSH as some sort of bitwise condom around the nasty little limed walled garden that you have forced upon a young lady who is clearly about twice as smart as you are?

    BTW — it’s not “good” for controlling computers. It’s not even “good” for transferring data. It’s just a protocol, you foolish ignorant old imbecile.

    Good to know that you’ve finally given up on FTP, on the other hand.

    You wretched, incoherent, disgusting old fool.

  9. DrLoser wrote, ” What could you possibly gain from using an SSH server in this scenario? I believe you two are both still happily married. I fail to see how a secure internet connection has any relevance whatsoever.”

    SSH is just one of many layers of security here. It’s also good for controlling computers remotely or transferring data.

  10. DrLoser says:

    Actually, I frequently use an SSH server running on an Odroid-C2, for control and maintenance of TLW’s desktop system.

    Just one question, Robert. What could you possibly gain from using an SSH server in this scenario? I believe you two are both still happily married. I fail to see how a secure internet connection has any relevance whatsoever.

    I fully understand your desire for “control.” Nobody who is in the habit of calling their magnificently far better half “TLW” would relinquish control. I’d watch out, if I were you: TLW is considerably smarter than you are, and I’m pretty sure she’s learned the dark arts of apt-get and/or configure/make/make install by now.

    As for “maintenance?” Your wife is just keeping you happy, old man. When she flies out on her frequent visits abroad, she relies on a standard Windows laptop.

    You’ve admitted it yourself.

  11. Deaf Spy says:

    “Actually, I frequently use an SSH server running on an Odroid-C2, for control and maintenance of TLW’s desktop system. ”
    It might be a surprise for you, but that doesn’t turn your Odroid into a real server.

    Don’t play a fool, Robert. Where is your ARM-based server(s) that would perform the roles of: file server and application terminal server?

  12. Grece wrote, “I know of no serious manufacturer that out-sources their products to be built from sub-assemblies, by third parties.”

    See 5 Canadian companies land on Automotive News list of top 100 suppliers

  13. Grece says:

    I know of no serious manufacturer that out-sources their products to be built from sub-assemblies, by third parties. Everything is done in-house for many of reasons, changes can be made and applied same day, versus waiting weeks for a third party contractor to “tweak” something.

    Obviously you know nothing of the manufacturing realm Robert.

  14. Grece wrote, “I mean that’s what he eluded to in his open house, so here we are once again, stating the obvious. Jerry is out-sourcing all assemblies and bringing them to one central location to build.”

    Isn’t that what everyone does, outsource to the most-efficient suppliers so that assembly is swift and sure? Solo was designed in-house but many sub-assemblies like brakes, lights, switches, motor etc. were designed outside and purchasing standard parts saves a ton of cash. The battery-assembly has to fit somewhere in Solo. Who better than EMV can tell the battery-makers the size and shape? It makes sense to build a few in-house to test them because they aren’t off the shelf except for the unit cells. Also, they’ve since modified the design to deal with heat so that has to be integrated in the out-sourced assembly somehow. It’s all good.

    Grece also wrote, “Nothing is being built / designed in-house save for the final assembly, of which they cannot seem to get even one a month under their belt and Robert think’s they are magically going to ship a few hundred next year?!?!”

    The facility they’ve exhibited could easily produce hundreds in a year but they don’t want to do that before certification because it’s too expensive to certify individually and too risky to recall hundreds for updates. EMV is still small. They don’t have any cushions for false steps like that. Until they have a good stream of revenue they have to be mighty risk-averse. They’ve come a long way to throw it all away over some stupid mistake now.

  15. Grece says:

    Wait, I thought Jerry was building the batteries in-house??

    I mean that’s what he eluded to in his open house, so here we are once again, stating the obvious. Jerry is out-sourcing all assemblies and bringing them to one central location to build.

    Nothing is being built / designed in-house save for the final assembly, of which they cannot seem to get even one a month under their belt and Robert think’s they are magically going to ship a few hundred next year?!?!

    LMAO.

  16. Kurkosdr says:


    Number one, you are never getting a Solo. Number two, Jerry cannot even install the correct battery. Buyer beware!!

    I think the real buyer beware here is the deliveries track record of EMV. Speaking of which, can the all-knowing Mr Pogson enlighten us on the matter?

  17. Kurkosdr says:

    Yes but you still use your x86-based “Beast” for all your real server needs.

    The fact you call a creaky old x86 a “Beast” and rely on it despite your desire to replace it with an ARM board speaks volumes about the viability of ARM boards like the Cello as replacements for x86 servers.

  18. Deaf Spy wrote, “Sure! Just like you already use your ARM server”.

    Actually, I frequently use an SSH server running on an Odroid-C2, for control and maintenance of TLW’s desktop system. It’s currently up to date and its temperature is 46 ºC.

  19. Deaf Spy says:

    I’ll be driving my bright red Solo this time next year.

    Sure! Just like you already use your ARM server.

  20. Grece wrote, “Number one, you are never getting a Solo. Number two, Jerry cannot even install the correct battery.”

    The prototypes and early Solos had an 8kWh battery. Batteries scale predictably. No problem as long as the production models are 16.1kWh as advertised. I’ll be driving my bright red Solo this time next year.

  21. Grece says:

    *Rolls-Eyes*

    Number one, you are never getting a Solo. Number two, Jerry cannot even install the correct battery. Buyer beware!!

    http://soloowners.net/showthread.php?tid=778

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *