Care And Feeding Of My New Buffalo Classic

I love muzzle-loading except for having to force down the bore tightly patched balls and cleaning the mess of black powder afterwards. In contrast, my new Buffalo Classic is a breech-loading cartridge rifle. All I need are the right combinations of bullet, powder, primer, case and tools to assemble the rounds…

I’ve worked that out many times. The BC is no different. In this calibre, one has a flexible range of loads available with smokeless powder and black can be used as well. Since I’m not hunting T-Rex or shooting 1000 yards, I don’t need 500 grain bullets. The lighter 300 grain bullets will do just fine. I like the specs of Hornady’s 300 grain jacketed hollow point. It can withstand 2500 ft/s muzzle velocity, certainly the upper limit of the recoil I can stand. At 2200 ft/s I can zero for 200 yards and stay well within the vital zone of a deer with ample energy remaining. At 2500 ft/s, 250 yards, about the limit of my ability to hit a deer off-hand, is equally feasible. So, I think a near-maximum load behind a 300 grain JHP will be my “open country” round. When I’m guarding a smaller space or stalking, I can use just about any bullet loaded down to ~1500 ft/s, with a trajectory much like a .22 rimfire but way more lethal. I can even use cast bullets for that close-in work. It may be feasible to purchase them instead of making my own because buying in bulk is economical.

For propellant there are many choices ranging from Unique for plinking cast bullets, to H4198, IMR4064, H322, IMR3031 etc. to really drive bullets all the way down that 32 inch barrel. The action is strong enough to hold any of the hot loads out there but there’s no need to punish me or the action to get to 2500 ft/s or a bit lower. Most of the published loads are for 22 to 26 inch barrels and the 32 inch barrel with a slower powder will get ~20 ft/s per extra inch, ~120 to 200 ft/s more with the same load or what I need with a lighter load. H4198 is very popular in 22 inch barrels but I expect H322 or IMR4064 will do better in the longer barrel. It will be fun to confirm this because it’s 11 months to the next deer-season.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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6 Responses to Care And Feeding Of My New Buffalo Classic

  1. Someone wrote, “Animals are living beings too, they deserve not to be shot by Robert.”

    I’d say a quick death by rifle fire is preferable to being chewed on by wolves/coyotes or starving to death or being clobbered by cars/trucks, the main manners of death for our deer. It’s over in seconds rather than minutes or hours. One of the advantages of the 8X57JS that I usually use or 45-70 calibre of the new rifle is that death tends to be quicker with the larger calibres than the more common .30-’06 or .308.

  2. An Out Of Phase Transistor says:

    NO evidence of this Robert. Are you day-dreaming again? Your ability to hit a deer in the vital area goes /dev/null after about 30 meters. Anything beyond that you are guessing and unnecessarily torturing the wildlife.

    1. Use a real gun
    2. Deploy a scope
    3. Let someone else take the shot
    4. Take credit for it
    5. Gloatingly post about it on your blog

    A better proposal, if I may; Robert, leave the gun alone, before you hurt something, or someone.

    Animals are living beings too, they deserve not to be shot by Robert.

  3. Chuckle. My BC has arrived, apparently in good condition. I’ll send pix when the thing warms up in the box. I don’t need condensation in the works.

  4. Grece wrote, “Your ability to hit a deer in the vital area goes /dev/null after about 30 meters. Anything beyond that you are guessing and unnecessarily torturing the wildlife.”

    Every year for the last five years, we took our rifles out to a gravel pit and verified that we and our equipment have not lost “it”. Every year I pick up the muzzle-loader, fire one shot at ~100 yards and hit a target much smaller than the vitals of a deer. Same goes for the Mauser. Next year my shiny new .45-70 will be in the mix. I am very experienced at shooting off-hand with scope or iron sights. We have rifles with both sighting systems. I have shot deer to ~300 yards off-hand. I have shot deer running. I just don’t need to these days with a younger hand in the other chair. I’m still ready and able to down a deer.

  5. Grece says:

    I can zero for 200 yards and stay well within the vital zone of a deer with ample energy remaining.

    NO evidence of this Robert. Are you day-dreaming again? Your ability to hit a deer in the vital area goes /dev/null after about 30 meters. Anything beyond that you are guessing and unnecessarily torturing the wildlife.

    1. Use a real gun
    2. Deploy a scope
    3. Let someone else take the shot
    4. Take credit for it
    5. Gloatingly post about it on your blog

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