Rearranging The Deck Chairs On Our Deck

Environment Canada is forecasting an intense low pressure cell north of us that will cause 60k/h westerly winds with gusts to 90k/h. 60 k/h is rather routine but 90k/h is dangerous. TLW and I were out in the yard planting a few pots of roses and day lilies and I did a brief sweep to secure empty pots and stuff that might blow around. Late in the evening it dawned on me that I had not stowed the chairs/tables/parasol on the deck so I went out to put them into corners where they would not take flight. I turned a table upside down to expose less surface to the wind. I watered a few large pots which seemed dry and lighter than they should have been.

Oh, well. It’s another test of our shingles and downspouts. After every such wind-event I find stuff from the neighbour’s yards in mine. So far no lawn chair has made it farther than the ditch here. Here’s hoping bad combinations don’t fall our way.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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29 Responses to Rearranging The Deck Chairs On Our Deck

  1. oiaohm says:

    Kurkosdr between Qualcomm patents and Microsoft saying that the interface could not be skilled with Windows Phone 7. The results was fairly one ODM.

    Reason think a smart-phone sitting in a shop display the biggest bit of advertisement is what is on the screen.
    http://www.ubergizmo.com/articles/why-custom-android-skins/
    So this custom skinning is a requirement to have ODM support in the phone space.

    Bravo Redmondian idiots! Thanks to you, we are stuck with a mobile OS that is fragmented, unpatched and tied to OEMs.

    That is the mobile phone market place. Unlock-able phones before Android that you could install third party roms was a rarity.

    Fragmentation you have to allow in the phone market unless you wish to be stuck to one ODM so each ODM can differentiate. Also kernel/driver modification that can case update issues has to be part of your plan.

    So Google plan with Andorid 8.0 and Treble might in fact work. As it allows
    1) ODM to remain on a custom kernel if they have to
    2) Allow as much of the userspace as possible to be update without risking house falling in.
    3) Allow ODM to custom skin so can differentiate
    4) Include a designed in fall back system that is universal if something does go wrong instead of per ODM solution.

    We have not seen a quality plan like this in the mobile phone market ever.

    Nvidia went Linux route in their arm compatible chips because they could customize the kernel. So windows phone not having Nvidia was Microsoft holding on to control way to tight. This is a balancing act between too tight and too lose. If you can find a sweet spot you will have ODM and Consumers happy.

    https://www.x.org/wiki/Events/XDC2017/peres_ci.pdf
    vs
    https://www.intel.com.au/content/www/au/en/support/articles/000006105/processors.html
    Should be a worry to those at Microsoft.

    Latest Linux kernel Intel has started setting up a test system to test 2004 to future hardware. Yet with Windows 10 Intel draws the line in the sand at 2012.

    What is the change Khronos opening up the conformance test suite after years of asking the open source world got enough seats on the Khronos board to vote for it..

    Year of Linux Desktop I have classed as a super gray thing. Different groups have been having year of the Linux Desktop for a long time. But as serous market share I have always said you are looking for the end of X11 being the dominate Linux interface. Due to design faults X11 cannot be properly secured.

    Like Wayland is not 100% here yet. We are starting to see the change. So a Wayland app developed on the Linux Workstation could be deployed in a ATM as is but a X11 application could not be because the X11 application would never pass security audit no matter how carefully it was coded.

    Now items like Civil and ATM want 10+ years of support and want the install old applications and new applications then the most import part have the money and developers to pull it off.

    So we are starting to see a domino effect. We are starting to see ODM like Intel give the level of support to Linux that the Civil and ATM and other secure embedded want. We are also seeing where Intel Microsoft lead desktop ODM is giving higher grade of support Linux Kernel over the Microsoft solution.

    Think about it x86 on desktop only has ODMs being AMD and Intel and if both of them turn back on Microsoft where will Microsoft be. The thing is they don’t have to turn back instantly on Microsoft. Just reduce supported time will make the Microsoft solution not suitable for a set of Microsoft existing customers and those are customers with development teams and money.

    You hear people say its all about the application. The shock reality is the application requires the hardware support. Not having the hardware support reduces market size. So the down fall of Windows Phone is starting to be applied to Windows Desktop.

  2. Kurkosdr says:

    OEM and ODM. Effectively Windows Phone 7 is one ODM Qualcomm.

    If you go back to Windows Mobile 6.5 you will notice many different ODM in the game.

    Well, big mistake that, tying themselves to a single chip vendor. Back in the days of Bill Gates, MS made sure Windows 95 worked excellently on AMD CPUs gave a special “designed for Windows 95” endorsement to AMD CPUs just to dispel the slightest fear that AMD CPUs wouldn’t work with the latest and greatest Windows.

    Microsoft could have taken advantage of Nvidia’s inability to follow the breakneck pace of Android (Tegra2 smartphones shipping with Froyo and taking ages to receive Gingerbread) and made Nvidia the #2 chip vendor for Windows Phone. I dunno, write drivers for them if needed. Every software company’s motto should be “Make hardware a commodity by piting hardware vendors again each other”. But you see, this takes a CEO with vision, not some accountant/used car salesman dude caring about the next month’s expenses, or a hipster design lead caring only about what the exact shade of blue should be and whether his haircut is feminine enough. Pining descriptions to individuals within MS is left as an exercise to the reader.

    Bravo Redmondian idiots! Thanks to you, we are stuck with a mobile OS that is fragmented, unpatched and tied to OEMs.

  3. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr its a hard fight with hardware vendors. Do the wrong things lose big time.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Windows_Phone_7_devices
    You will see something horrible if you notice who makes all those CPU. They are basically all Qualcomm.

    Although they tried to claw back some power from OEMs by not allowing skins and other mucking around in WP7 and beyond, they never made the world of embedded “PC-like”.
    OEM and ODM. Effectively Windows Phone 7 is one ODM Qualcomm.

    If you go back to Windows Mobile 6.5 you will notice many different ODM in the game. With devices using SOC chips from many different ODMs. So effectively don’t allow hardware makers to uniquely skin and modify to suit their hardware results in the doomed fate of very limit supply vendors making chips for your OS.

    So the way Microsoft pushed back fired. Cut off their supply of ODM and that leads to doom unless you company controls that ODM.

    Who in their right mind would give up the standardized world of the PC to voluntarily immerse themselves into the nasty world of embedded, aka into the nasty world of binary blobs and crooked custom kernels?
    There are a lot of questions. Arm moving to device tree model is reducing number of custom kernels.

    https://itsfoss.com/linux-lts-kernel-six-years/
    Kurkosdr something to remember Android has been support in has been years long than the upstream kernel. Upstream kernel was 2 years and android has been averaging 3. At google pushing this has now been moved to 6 years.

    So 4.4 LTS kernel that is min version to be used in Android 8 devices released in 2017 has 6 years support from 10 Jan 2016. So 4-5 years effective.

    There is also the plan for the super long term support (SLTS) kernel that is 10-20 years of support on a particular Linux kernel versions. Those would be nice to see standard on phones.

    All these changes we will have to see how it plays out with Android 8.0 and newer phones. Maybe we will start getting smart phones with more than 3 years of support from vendor/upstream as standard.

    We are also seeing a push to get rid of the Android custom graphics stack and allow standard open source stack in it space. Again when you are talking about having to support for 4-5 years binary drivers do come with trouble.

    To have ODM support you have to allow ODM to customize the core of the OS to support their hardware. Then google with Android treble project is right ODM you can customize the core yet there will be a standard interface from that to user space so updating all the user-space code will be possible.

    Maybe Google with Android 8.0 forwards has a plan that will work. Not a failed plan like Microsoft Windows Phone 7 that left Microsoft with a more uniform OS and being chained to ODM who could dictate terms.

    Android phones with a longer support time frame than the average operational life of most laptops could be the next generation of Android phones. The average lifespan of a laptop is 4 years. This lifespan could explain why Samsung is looking at Linux Desktop with Android in a phone right now.

    The extended LTS of the Linux kernel do bring a lot of interesting questions. One of Microsoft big selling points for hardware vendors and deployments has been 10 years support on fairly much the same kernel. So another reason to choose Windows is disappearing. Like serous-ally who would have forecast that this year we would see the Linux mainline LTS kernels support for 6 years and a cit kernel support for 10-20 years all funded by enterprises. 20 years support is long than Microsoft has wanted to-do. 20 years support also does not work for binary drivers go back 20 years and see how much hardware the vendor does not exist today let alone them still making drivers for it.

  4. Grece says:

    Sorry Robert, the majority of people just don’t care enough. They rather spend time doing other things, instead of dabbling in the command line to make their sound function.

  5. ” they choose to use Microsoft Windows”

    I doubt many make that choice. In fact there are several people using FLOSS on their client for every one using TOOS.

  6. Grece says:

    Billions of human beings, people who buy stuff and share information about everything.

    And yet, they choose to use Microsoft Windows.

    FLOSS enables people to render any hardware more intelligent.

    Jerry and the Solo do not utilize FLOSS Robert, So I in your eyes I suppose using hardware *less* intelligent. Which confirms my suspicion that it is a failing venture.

  7. kurkosdr wrote, “Who in their right mind would give up the standardized world of the PC to voluntarily immerse themselves into the nasty world of embedded, aka into the nasty world of binary blobs and crooked custom kernels?”

    Billions of human beings, people who buy stuff and share information about everything. FLOSS enables people to render any hardware more intelligent. That makes the world a better place and is a valuable contribution to the advancement of humanity whether or not it is in a rocky, narrow, wide, weed-infested place. The world is lush and harsh all at the same time. The problems kurkosdr considers important are unimportant in the grand scheme of things.

    One could say the same thing about horseradish. It’s ugly stuff, spreads like a weed, is a pain to dig up, and yet it gives everyone free access to the condiment of the gods. Pop chunks in the blender. Add vinegar, salt and sugar. Cook a bit. Keep it in the refrigerator all winter long. Turn meat into pizza… It’s the result that matters, not all kurkosdr’s puny objections.

    That reminds me. It’s time to dig up my patch of horseradish. It’s a companion plant for a cherry. It sure does compete well with other weeds and is supposed to keep bugs away. Who cares if it’s ugly?

  8. kurkosdr says:

    BTW, this is why I question Pog’s enthusiasm about ARMed “small cheap” desktop computers. Who in their right mind would give up the standardized world of the PC to voluntarily immerse themselves into the nasty world of embedded, aka into the nasty world of binary blobs and crooked custom kernels? Just to get less power and less compatibility with existing binaries? And all this just because of a jihad against an ISA?

  9. kurkosdr says:

    Windows CE phones were great examples of OEM extended right down to adding own APIs. Windows update for phones got really good at ruining the day of any OEM who had messed with it so customers started avoiding the products that first update bricked.

    That was the big mistake I said in my previous post. Microsoft embraced (to a degree) the nasty world of embedded and let every device have its own ROM. Although they tried to claw back some power from OEMs by not allowing skins and other mucking around in WP7 and beyond, they never made the world of embedded “PC-like”. Can you imagine the unique selling proposition of being able to buy a copy of Windows Phone 8 or Windows 10 Mobile from a computer store down the street or Microsoft’s site and upgrade your phone just like that, no need to hunt for ROMs? Like you can do on one those Atom netbooks that our transistor mentioned?

  10. oiaohm says:

    Kurkosdr its not the EULA that prevents vendors from messing with Windows. Its the licenses on the development and required driver signing.

    Windows CE phones were great examples of OEM extended right down to adding own APIs. Windows update for phones got really good at ruining the day of any OEM who had messed with it so customers started avoiding the products that first update bricked.

    Tivoization is something that has to be revisited in the USA courts at some point now that GPL is declared under Contract Law not copyright law. It might be another thing that turns out not to be legal.

    https://download.lineageos.org/hammerhead Nexus 5 you can do something about to fix its WiFi vulnerabilities.

    Turns out you can do something about the HTC M8 as well http://rootmygalaxy.net/best-android-nougat-roms-htc-onem8/

    Neither of those devices is locked so you cannot update.

    Here is something you need to take with a strict seriousness. Those who bought windows phone 8 phones only got a max of 3 years support from Microsoft as well. That was a good release. Windows phone 8 only got 2 years of support.

    Please note most of these Windows phone devices no option of third party roms so once they are insecure there is nothing you can do at all.

    Iphones are only officially supported for updates for 3 years. Yes once insecure there is again nothing you can really do.

    Kurkosdr so Android devices are not alone here. The history of smart phones has been littered with insecure after 2-4 years. So more than 2 years with a smart-phone getting updates is doing well.

    Android phone that you can install custom roms you can keep secure by install a secure custom rom for about 6 to 7 years then you normally run into major battery trouble. Yes making the battery not replaceable to so call make the phone more water proof is a really good way to make those using third party roms don’t be able to extend life of device as much.

    Yes windows phone has the same problem on phones that Windows phone 7 drivers don’t work with Windows phone 8 and windows phone 8 drivers don’t work with Windows phone 8.1 so unless vendor provides new drivers you were stuffed. And you can follow this back into the Windows CE phones back to the year 2000 and before.

    The mobile phone world has changed OS players but has not changed how it behaves that much because most of the same hardware vendors are still in place doing the same kinds of behaviors..

  11. Kurkosdr says:

    It’s the same reason I always hated the mobile versions of Java. Sun pretended J2ME was one thing and touted the openness and build-once-run-everywhere-ness of J2ME, while in reality no J2ME implementation was identical to another, which meant every J2ME implementation needed tailored apps and games.

  12. Kurkosdr says:

    It’s funny isn’t it, the wonder of Linux bringing such costly and worthless trinkets. Some minds must wonder: but, but, but, Linux is free… Free, I tell you!!

    The miracle of “open-source”. With no MS EULA to stop OEMs from mucking around with the OS, every Linux smartphone essentially has its own OS, which just happens to implement the same APIs as some other OSes, which means the OS is married to the hardware. Which means we are back in the pre-IBM PC era of Apple and Amiga.

    And there is always tivoization, allowed by the glorious GPLv2 license in order to formally disallow any installation of an AOSP build, or whatever is supposed to be the “clean” standard OS image these days of the Pixel.

    Even Maemo/MeeGo, the poster child of FOSS mobile OSe,s was tightly coupled to specific Nokia models, one “instance” per model.

    There are dark days ahead, and there is no Bill Gates to save the day this time round. Even MS went the way of marrying hardware and software to some degree (big mistake, that).

    Small non-cheap computers. The nasty world of embedded, with Linux fragmentation and Linux tivoization. Bon appetit!

    PS: My Nexus 5 and HTC M8 won’t get their WiFi vulnerabilities patched.

    PS: I bought the M8 two weeks ago from eBay…

  13. An Out Of Phase Transistor says:

    “(msg to Pog: Small cheap my a$$)”

    It’s funny isn’t it, the wonder of Linux bringing such costly and worthless trinkets. Some minds must wonder: but, but, but, Linux is free… Free, I tell you!!

    Meanwhile, you could get an Atom based tablet with Windows 10 for about 70 Euros a while ago, sure, those were so called “action” prices, but still, if you want price competitive products, it’s all about Windows.

    Robert is hurting himself (financially) by not admitting this to himself (well, alternatively, Canada could also be a country from the twilight zone, with everything being “different” there, somehow I doubt that’s the case…).

  14. oiaohm says:

    BTW, if any Pogs around here are wondering why Samsung’s solution is not cheap,: With the software being given out free of charge, the only way to make money (and recoup the R&D costs of creating consumer-grade software) is to sell expensive hardware.
    Kurkosdr not exactly true.
    https://maruos.com

    What Samsung is doing in their phone has been done by Maruos for a while. These people are not funded by Samsung. So 99% of the R&D cost was done. So Samsung charging arm and leg for it is just being Samsung, Be it a new hardware or software feature to Samsung they do that. Totally not linked to R&D.

  15. Deaf Spy says:

    We seniors don’t have jobs so we have more time for DIY.

    Until you make an actual purchase, Robert, you are not a customer. DIYs buy often and a lot, because they experiment. You want something that is accomplished and works, but comes at a price of a DIY board. Well, you are really no market.

  16. Ivan wrote, “what happened?”

    The forecast was a bit off. The highest gust was 73km/h and the objects I secured were secure. A couple of bags of weeds did blow into the ditch. I also found an empty pot I’d missed heading for the ditch. So, no harm done. The wind did dry some potted plants a bit so I followed up with a good watering.

  17. Ivan says:

    Well, what happened? Did your deck blow away? Did a long line of women interviewing for your neighbor’s nanny position get blown into Ontario?

    You shouldn’t leave us hanging, Bob.

  18. Grece wrote, “to be technical, you have a patio NOT a deck.”

    Actually we have both. The objects I secured were on the deck, 4 feet above the patio and fully exposed.

  19. Grece says:

    Actually Robert, to be technical, you have a patio NOT a deck.

  20. kurkosdr wrote, “Old folks who are DIY-ers don’t. They are a too small group, especially for DIY in IT.”

    Nonsense. We seniors don’t have jobs so we have more time for DIY. Two of my neighbours do their own landscaping, pool and birdhouse building. IT is just one of many things we can do.

  21. kurkosdr says:

    Old folks matter.

    Old folks who are DIY-ers don’t. They are a too small group, especially for DIY in IT.

  22. kurkosdr wrote, “Small cheap my a$$”.

    I think that’s a poor reading of TFA. $100 adds a feature to a smartphone, a desktop environment to which one can attach monitor, keyboard and mouse. It’s not making a desktop system out of a smartphone. The thing is still a smartphone but the smartphone has added value because it can provide compute, storage, and connectivity to a desktop user. $100 is replacing, more or less, a box of CPU, RAM, storage, with a smartphone and the new device, more or less what I’ve been advocating for years. I do get ahead of the market sometimes. I’m slow. I need a head-start.

  23. kurkosdr wrote, “Retired teachers playing with DIY-grade software are irrelevant in the grand scheme of thing.”

    I doubt that. I’m a consumer. My income mostly goes to purchases and taxes. A business which doesn’t please me is missing part of the market. I buy lots of stuff. TLW is nearing retirement too. She was a teacher in the old days and she spends a lot too.

    “Canada’s Population, by Age Group, 2004
    Age Group Number % Distribution
    55-64 years 3,386,700 10.6%
    65-74 years 2,212,900 6.9%
    75+ years 1,928,100 6.0%”

    Old folks matter.

  24. kurkosdr says:

    BTW, if any Pogs around here are wondering why Samsung’s solution is not cheap,: With the software being given out free of charge, the only way to make money (and recoup the R&D costs of creating consumer-grade software) is to sell expensive hardware.

    Retired teachers playing with DIY-grade software are irrelevant in the grand scheme of thing.

  25. Kurkosdr says:

    Continuum of course comes attached to a mobile OS that is completely irrelevant and app-less whose vendor has stopped making devices for it.

    So, even if Continuum is a better secondary feature to Samsung’s,bit comes attached to a mobile OS that fails at it’s primary features.

  26. Deaf Spy says:

    I ‘ll just leave this here

    Again Linux is late to the party. Continuum has been here for years. And actually works. Too pity MS froze it for now.

  27. Grece wrote, “You should build a small pole barn Robert. Instead of fixing your vehicles in your driveway”.

    Sun provides better illumination. I don’t see what good a barn would do me. I have plenty of space now. Each season, I rearrange the parking. In a week or two I will change to snow tires, park the roto-tiller and mower and bring forward the snowblower. It’s all good. I might improve the greenhouse though. It’s too drafty and doesn’t regulate temperature much except to slow down the wind.

  28. Grece says:

    You should build a small pole barn Robert. Instead of fixing your vehicles in your driveway due to your garage being filled with junk.

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