ASUS Provides Competition In ARM SBCs

“From a performance perspective, the ASUS Tinker Board is a capable ARM SBC for its price tag of only $60 USD. The performance is very good against the inexpensive (sub-$100) boards while obviously if needing greater performance there is more to find with the NVIDIA Jetson line-up.
 
The stock Debian 9.0 image for the Tinker Board is quite capable and useful while for those craving an Android environment there’s that too. The GPIO pin layout and PCB board form factor compatibility with the Raspberry Pi 2+ is nice. Though what the Tinker Board doesn’t have is quite the developer community around this ARM SBC that the Raspberry Pi has built over the years. We’ll see over the months ahead how the Tinker Board community grows and if it can rival that of the more popular ARM developer boards.”
 
See ASUS Tinker Board Is An Interesting ARM SBC For About $60 USD Review
I had been settled on Odroid-C2 as my standard ARMed client platform but ASUS now has the Tinker Board which is very similar but a bit better on performance/dollar. Besides price/performance, ASUS is very widely distributed so I can buy this thing in Canada for lower shipping costs. I like that. Thanks, Phoronix.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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13 Responses to ASUS Provides Competition In ARM SBCs

  1. Grece says:

    ARM? Competition??

    INTEL is laughing it’s silly ass off at you Robert!

  2. oiaohm says:

    Robert Pogson being a Arm partner gives them the right to redesign the chip if they want. That is why in the current ARMv8-A there are 7 designs that are not by Arm themselves.

    Now intel or amd x86 you fab for them you don’t get the right to redesign the chips.

    Robert Pogson I should have been more clear there are over 12 companies who fab chips who have their own design of arm cores.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_ARMv8-A_cores I do have to admit to a miss count. There are 6 companies with their own designs of ARMv8 cores other than Arm. I typed 7 and I mistakenly counted Arm.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_x86_manufacturers

    The list of x86 manufacturers that can design current generation x86 is quite short. Only 2 have the cross license agreement to make every feature being AMD and Intel. The third is VIA. Outside those 3 hopefully you like having only 486 based tech as different patents held by AMD and Intel forbid being more advances than that.

    This is where arm is interesting. Arm licenses companies the access to arm designs and the right to use arm patents in own designs. So if companies own design of Arm chip is worse than Arm parent company design they can use the Arm parent company design instead.

    So, I think it depends a lot on what question one asks. ARM is everywhere used by almost everyone in every way.
    Every snapdragon arm chip is Qualcomm design of the arm core so that is all qualcomm phones. Apple has their own modified design of arm core.. Samsung also has their own design that they use in some devices and use Arm parent design in others.

    Arm as a license technology is every where. Arm as a silicon design from Arm the company not so much once you allow for how much Arm instruction set compatible chips are out there that are not design by Arm the company.

    If x86 chips were license as arm we would have broader selection of x86 chips to choose form.

  3. oiaohm wrote, “fabrication companies way over 12 making ARM CPU cores this includes Intel”.

    According to ARM: “Arm is the industry’s leading supplier of microprocessor technology, offering the widest range of microprocessor cores to address the performance, power and cost requirements for almost all application markets. Combining a vibrant ecosystem with more than 1,000 partners delivering silicon, development tools and software, and with more than 90 billion processors shipped, our technology is at the heart of a computing and connectivity revolution that is transforming the way people live and businesses operate.”

    So, I think it depends a lot on what question one asks. ARM is everywhere used by almost everyone in every way.

  4. oiaohm says:

    And the companies making ARM CPU cores are a grand total of two, maybe three, just like in x86-land.
    Kurkosdr please do your research in fabrication companies way over 12 making ARM CPU cores this includes Intel.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_semiconductor_fabrication_plants
    Most companies who have fabrication plants have arm license to produce arm chips.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ARM_microarchitectures
    If you restrict yourself to current generation arm. You have the cores by Arm the main company and you have the cores designed by 7 other firms as well to choose from. Yes those 7 other designs are totally different at the silicon level.

    Why 7 other designs with arm you buy a fabrication license from arm you get all the patents and those patents cover you if you make alternative designs as well.

    The arm eco system looks nothing like the x86 one. Does suggest there need to be some force applied in x86 to make x86 patents more open to being licensed. Please note Nvidia has attempt to buy a x86 license 8 times they do have arm license and do design their own arm cores.

  5. Grece says:

    Robert, never buys anything. He always jumps to the latest and greatest so-to-speak and never accomplishes anything in life.

  6. Kurkosdr says:

    Heh, Robert would die before admitting 1 and 2. That is why you are met with proud silence πŸ™‚

    I just can’t “get” those freedomites: For years their railed against proprietary GPU drivers as if it threatened their dog’s life.

    Intel finally gave them open gpu drivers, and now they want to immerse themselves back into the murky waters of blobs and custom kernels, which mean that even if they “run” the latest version, have to pair it to a blob designed for a previous version, bugs and whatnot.

    And the funny thing is that the ARM architecture is neither a patent-free architecture nor has any significant open source implementations. And the companies making ARM CPU cores are a grand total of two, maybe three, just like in x86-land.

    It’s much like the reason I can’t get SJWs: For years, the hijab was an anathema to women liberation, now it is apparently cool because Muslims are proletarian brothers or something (they are not actually).

    You just can’t “get” those people. There is no logic, reason, ideals or even priorities. They are guided by cheap media outlets and/or by the “enemy of my enemy” sentiment.

  7. The Wiz wrote, “The only β€œvalue” that seems to be relevant to you is you can save a whole $20.00 on the board.”

    No. I get the board, CPU, I/O, RAM and the ability to buy more boards for the same money. It’s like a young man having three dates in one evening, memorable and worthwhile.

  8. wizard emiritus says:

    “It is different.”

    How? The only “value” that seems to be relevant to you is you can save a whole $20.00 on the board. Woopie!

  9. The Wiz wrote, “Another marginally better embedded system developer board joins the fray. Nothing much to see here – move on.”

    It is different. Newegg and others can deliver this to the world in a few days at a good price. That cuts out expensive freight for orders in small quantities. This will be great for DIYers. I like it for two of the TVs in my home, my personal client and as a controller for my movable solar array, battery charge controller and inverter. That’s 4 units for just one buyer. My Odroid-c2 cost nearly $100 delivered. This is a slightly better performer for about $20 less. That means I can buy 4 for the price of 3. Usually buying several at once will save additional money on Canadian shipping. Saving money on sea or air freight across the Pacific is a big deal. NewEgg orders thousands by sea or air and I get to save on their volume. It’s good news. Further, ASUS gives reasonable support of what they sell.

  10. wizard emiritus says:

    Another marginally better embedded system developer board joins the fray. Nothing much to see here – move on.

  11. Deaf Spy says:

    Heh, Robert would die before admitting 1 and 2. That is why you are met with proud silence πŸ™‚

  12. Kurkosdr wrote, “Does your ODROID run the latest version of the OS with all the integrated peripherals working?”

    Yes.

  13. Kurkosdr says:

    My Nexus Player, an x86 device, got the Android Oreo update despite being 34 months old.

    No other ARM device I own, including Nexus ARM devices, got version upgrades beyond 24 months.

    With these facts in mind, lemme ask you Pog some questions.

    1) Do you admit Intel has better Linux driver support compared to ARM chip vendors?

    2) Do you admit that Intel chips cover the needs of Linux users better?

    3) Does your ODROID run the latest version of the OS with all the integrated peripherals working?

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