Yes, Electra Meccanica Has A Factory

“Wednesday, April 19th, Electra Meccanica invites you to visit our SOLO factory. From this 5,000+ square foot facility, located at 47 Braid Street in New Westminster, will soon emerge the first run of production SOLOs! Come by between 5:00 P.M. and 7:00 P.M. for a look at this bustling new centre for B.C. automanufacturing. Say hello to the manufacturing team behind the SOLO, including Intermeccanica’s Henry Reisner, and Electra Meccanica CEO Jerry Kroll!”Yes, folks are grumbling while waiting for production to begin but there is space and manpower for the ramp-up from prototype to production. Waiting for my number to come up is painful and Vancouver is too far for me to visit but if you are in the neighbourhood, drop by. See ElectraMeccanica.com

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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19 Responses to Yes, Electra Meccanica Has A Factory

  1. Well_well says:

    Grece, stop trying to convince Pog with logic. Just ask questions and wait for the answers, and take pleasure from mentally taxing the gullible.

    Apparently you are describing an ages-old method of those who are promoting ideas that they even themselves have difficulties believing in, but have lots of idle time in their disposal. There’s the old saying: one fool can ask more than seven wise men can answer.

    In other words: you are practicing fear, uncertainity and doubt.

  2. Grece wrote, “Have they shipped a SINGLE vehicle yet? NOPE.”

    Yes, they have. They shipped a single vehicle to the Chinese partner. There’s a video of it being examined and driven around the block there. They’ve certainly produced a few machines. Nothing prevents them shipping in quantity except the certification process which is ongoing.

    Grece wrote, “Where is the support and warranty for the vehicle?”

    Anyone can service the bearings and tires. They are industry-standard parts. The warranty for batteries is five years. I have an electric motor that still works after 30 years of sitting around. It would probably run for at least a decade of normal use. Usually manufacturers warranty them for at least one year. Solid state electronics can last decades. Wiring can last decades. I’m not worried at all about warranties and service. Why is Grece? I’m not even worried about a manual. I’m sure they can produce one in a week or so once the design is finalized and certified. I’ll write my own if one is not required in the certification process. I’ll put it on the web for $free… There will certainly be others who write much about this fine machine once distributed far and wide.

  3. Kurkosdr says:

    Grece, stop trying to convince Pog with logic. Just ask questions and wait for the answers, and take pleasure from mentally taxing the gullible.

  4. Grece says:

    A ponzi scheme never actually delivers a product. It’s a scam.

    Precisely, my point. Have they shipped a SINGLE vehicle yet? NOPE.

    EM has delivered a product.

    Oh?…news to me! Which of the ten did they deliver to a paying customer?

    They could do big production in Canada with big investors/governmental support but they can also do it in China with big investors/governmental support.
    What investors? No one is going to invest in this venture, NO ONE.

    China is only too glad to take up the slack in Canada.

    Yes, along with hundreds other electric car manufacturers. https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/electric-car.html

    So, none of Grece’s comment has any merit.

    Ah, but it does! All my comments are factual and non-biased, unlike yours.

    EM is living within its means with small/managed cash-flow. When they do ship units from their factory, they will have plenty of cash-flow because the margins on this car are substantial.

    Wait, you just stated that they did deliver a product, which is it? Are you blind…even in their SEC filings it states they are cash negative and may have to cease operations if further funding is not forthcoming. Look at their balance sheet, as of Sept. 30th, 2016. Cash: $234,213.00 Liabilities: $1,149,720.00 Does that look like a sustainable business venture? To think, that was six-months ago and I am surely certain they are now broke.

    They are developing newer models not to run a ponzi scheme but to keep their “creatives” busy and to stay ahead of competition which will inevitably compete with Solo.

    What competition? There is no competition selling a three-wheel vehicle. Name one three-wheel vehicle on the road today, just one.

    Instead of being swamped when that competition appears they will have further products to expand into new markets. It’s all good. Nothing negative in this.

    Wait, you just stated that they had competition, which is it? Oh, there is a lot to be negative about with this company. In my opinion, their business plan was problematic since day one, and the exec’s that dumped money in this losing venture are going to regret doing so, when things drag out, products are not delivered and problems creep up with the vehicle itself. Where is the support and warranty for the vehicle? I will leave that for you to figure out.

  5. Kurkosdr wrote, “Chevrolet already has a track record of mass-producing trucks and was probably already cranking out mass-produced examples similar to the truck you ordered or the immediately predecessor model.”

    InterMeccanica has been making vehicles for decades. Solo will be produced using similar methods. It’s not massive production by modern standards but it doesn’t need to be yet. There’s no competition in the space of commuting single-seaters except motorcycles which are much more dangerous and require much more skill to survive. So, they charge a high initial price as first-to-market and deliver a desirable product. The model works.

    They can ramp up production by lowering prices with better more efficient methods or they can slough off mass production to the Chinese motorcycle industry. It’s all good. The Chinese have a long track record of mass-production and with containerized shipping can deliver to market anywhere in the world quite cheaply. My rototiller, for instance, cost about $500 CDN to ship to Vancouver. That would be a tiny part of the cost of one unit of Solo. So, there is a valid means of breaking even and a valid means of expanding/competing in a more mature market. It’s all good.

  6. Grece wrote, “The company is already cash-strapped, and no government entity is coming to its rescue. No IPO, no huge investors, so all it can do is tout a second more expensive electric big-wheel with a pricier deposit, and increasing marketing to bring in more suckers to it’s ponzi scheme.”

    A ponzi scheme never actually delivers a product. It’s a scam. EM has delivered a product. They could do big production in Canada with big investors/governmental support but they can also do it in China with big investors/governmental support. China is only too glad to take up the slack in Canada. So, none of Grece’s comment has any merit. EM is living within its means with small/managed cash-flow. When they do ship units from their factory, they will have plenty of cash-flow because the margins on this car are substantial. They are developing newer models not to run a ponzi scheme but to keep their “creatives” busy and to stay ahead of competition which will inevitably compete with Solo. Instead of being swamped when that competition appears they will have further products to expand into new markets. It’s all good. Nothing negative in this.

  7. Grece echoed innuendo, saying much about nothing. Quoting TFA, “may”. An asteroid may fall on Earth and destroy us all. Therefor we should do nothing. QED.

    EM has a good idea about an EV that meets a need in the market for transportation. I see no reason they won’t get to market soon enough to catch the wave of adoption of EVs. Huge growth. A niche with little competition at the moment. It’s a good opportunity about to be exploited. Why does Grece poop on people with good ideas? Ignorance? Envy? Stuck in the mud?

  8. Well_well wrote, “A 5hp gasoline outboard costs about $1000 while equivalent electric one costs about $3000 and that’s without the battery. Absolutely ridiculous.”

    It’s all about power to weight ratio. If you make a boat heavier by adding a ton of batteries, the power has to go way up to get it to plane. One can use a small battery at high drain rate to compete but then the range is extremely limited. It’s not ridiculous. It’s physics. Reciprocating engines running at very high RPM require a lot of precision parts and engineering. They are not as durable/reliable as electric motors but they do serve a purpose in light vehicles. Where electric motors do make sense is getting light/small boats to troll around a low speeds using solar panels/concentrators or sails instead of/as well as a battery. They’ve been on the market for ages. Just forget planing… Such technology was used to fly a special airplane around the world but it was shipping little more than a very stubborn/patient pilot. Cruising speed was 87 mph in daylight and 37mph at night. The trip took over a year with frequent stops although the actual flying time was just 23 days.

  9. Well_well says:

    What I would really like to see would be a reasonably priced electric outboard motor with enough power to act as the main engine of a small planing-hulled boat. A 5hp gasoline outboard costs about $1000 while equivalent electric one costs about $3000 and that’s without the battery. Absolutely ridiculous.

    I have been even thinking getting an old gasoline outboard with seized powerhead and replacing it with a high power model electric engine.

  10. Grece says:

    Watch out for them software bugs!

    Our vehicles may contain defects in design and manufacture that may cause them not to perform as expected or that may require repair. For example, our vehicles use a substantial amount of software code to operate. Software products are inherently complex and often contain defects and errors when first introduced. While we have performed extensive internal testing, we currently have a very limited frame of reference by which to evaluate the performance of our SOLO in the hands of our customers and currently have no frame of reference by which to evaluate the performance of our SOLO after several years of customer driving.

    https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1637736/000106299317000733/form424b3.htm

  11. Grece says:

    I find it hilarious the amount of doubling-down Robert is doing on this. The company is already cash-strapped, and no government entity is coming to its rescue. No IPO, no huge investors, so all it can do is tout a second more expensive electric big-wheel with a pricier deposit, and increasing marketing to bring in more suckers to it’s ponzi scheme.

  12. Kurkosdr says:

    I bought a special-order Chevrolet™ pickup once. I wasn’t even promised a delivery-date. By Grece’s logic, every manufacturer must be a scam artist.

    Chevrolet already has a track record of mass-producing trucks and was probably already cranking out mass-produced examples similar to the truck you ordered or the immediately predecessor model.

    I will let you figure out why this is an important difference…

    Nah… who am I kidding, you are so gullible and so deeply buried in confirmation bias you could never​ figure it out yourself even after repeatedly hit with a clue bat. So here is the explanation in plain English:

    Mass-producing electric vehicles is hard. It requires getting lots of things right such as tooling scale, production methods, worker training, lithium battery supply and safety and durability of the final product. There is a chance that Electra Mechanicca will get those right, there is one they don’t. And yet you are here Pogs, full of certainty they will pull it off. So, they have a factory, there is no way of knowing if it will be a glorified garage or if they will manage to achieve mass-production, for all the reasons I mentioned before. Stop being so easily convinced. This could become yet another Cello disaster, they also had a factory if you remember.

  13. Grece wrote, “How convenient, scam artists always leave themselves an out.”

    I bought a special-order Chevrolet™ pickup once. I wasn’t even promised a delivery-date. By Grece’s logic, every manufacturer must be a scam artist. More likely Grece is spreading falsehoods.

  14. Grece says:

    Car Number: 1 – 50 *Estimated Delivery Date: Q2 – 2017

    Additionally, I failed to mention, see the asterisk at the beginning of the estimated delivery date? That signifies additional important information, typically shown below, or in this instance, at the VERY bottom of the page and in this case “*All delivery dates are subject to change without notice.”

    How convenient, scam artists always leave themselves an out.

  15. Kurkosdr wrote, “you either have to be a behemoth like BMW or GM, or a visionary with tons of millions in hand and willingness to literally set up camp in the factory floor.”

    The Chinese partner is a behemoth shipping millions of units annually. As far as I know they have all the parts on hand except the body. They can surely meet demand for the next few years with no sweat.

  16. Kurkosdr wrote, “do you know what number on the waiting list you are, Pogs?”

    Yes, assuming no one has cancelled. I’m scheduled for Q1 2018. I still haven’t decided whether to pay cash or over 2-3 years. If my income keeps increasing at the present rate, I’d be better off paying cash.

  17. Kurkosdr says:

    drops to the square of it. = drops by the square of it.

  18. Kurkosdr says:

    will soon emerge the first run of production SOLOs!

    Yeah, “soon” (snark intended).

    So they have a factory floor. Let’s assume they have the tooling too. That leaves manpower, securing lithium batteries in enough quantities and finding a way to ramp up production to mass production levels. Easy-peasy.

    BTW, do you know what number on the waiting list you are, Pogs?

    I know, I am hard, but experience has shown that in order to mass-produce an EV, you either have to be a behemoth like BMW or GM, or a visionary with tons of millions in hand and willingness to literally set up camp in the factory floor. Building EVs at mass-production rates is hard, and the fact the solo is smaller won’t help.

    Pog, you need to learn about finding the sweet spot between cheapness and value. Just like there are diminishing returns when you go upwards on price, there are when you go downwards. Aka, for every amount of money you shave, the value you gets drops to the square of it.

    If you knew that, you wouldn’t buy a cheap ARM board instead of a proper AMD-powered PC, or a phone with 1GB of RAM, or the Solo EV.

  19. Grece says:

    Car Number: 1 – 50 *Estimated Delivery Date: Q2 – 2017

    My, oh my!…good ole’ Jerry, is opening up is operations to the public, as if it wasn’t already open to begin with. *rolls-eyes*

    Typically, the second quarter usually spans April 1-June 30 and seeing that the first ten units have not even been completed. There is no way in hell, the other forty will be available come July, no way!

    One thing I have noted, reading Jerry’s twitter, you find some interesting tidbits:

    He likes driving Tesla’s instead: https://twitter.com/jerrykroll/status/834835108204982272

    Here we learn his true intent and purpose for building the electric big-wheel: https://twitter.com/jerrykroll/status/833107700661694464 Being tired of working in the private sector, a posh politician is the crème de la crème’ of jobs one can obtain, an over-zealous salary and nothing but bickering 1/3 of the year, while spending taxpayers money on lavish vacations and lifestyle.

    Jerry is a hypocrite, he is concerned about the environment when it comes to plastics, but builds an electric big-wheel, praying for government funding, that is mainly comprised of plastics. https://image.ibb.co/hJLCqk/Screenshot_from_2017_04_14_20_46_31.png

    To finalize, Jerry just seems to say the most amazing things! “Potentially, we could be building 100,000 of our cars next year, or double what Tesla has been able to put out,” Kroll says. “I will caution that by saying that they’ve actually done 55,000 and we plan on producing 100,000. So, we’ll see what happens.”

    CHUCKLE

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