Solo Progress

“For the first time ever we will have the 2017 Electra Meccanica Solo on full Autoshow display for people to see, touch, sit in and order! First Solo deliveries are now planned for May, and with over 500 orders already on our books I expect new orders placed will deliver around July 2018 when we have our production lines ramped up.”
 
See Electra Meccanica CEO Update
I was hoping for news that deliveries to buyers would start this month but delay happens. I suspect the last remaining issue is USA/Canadian governmental certification. I don’t know whether they’ve been forced to remedy some deficiencies or it’s the sluggish bureaucracy of paper-pushers. Whatever. This probably means I can take delivery of my red beauty in summer when I will be able to drive it everywhere immediately. I was just in conversation with a documentarist about ways and means of exploring Manitoba electrically and documenting my travels. That should be fun, much better than wait-wait-waiting… In the meantime I’m working on getting a bunch of seeds to germinate. Another growing season may keep me sane during the wait.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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19 Responses to Solo Progress

  1. oiaohm wrote, “So 93min built becomes a 10 step production line. So a new car is started every 10 mins at the same time a new car is completed.”

    The low complexity of the Solo EV permits other modes of assembly. Every part except the body can be handled easily by one guy, so you have a few people setting up a cart and one or two people can finish the assembly on that cart. Consider options. Solo has very few: A/C or not, these wheels or those, one of four colours, charging cable or not and it’s done. I can see the handful of people already on the payroll cranking out a few per week easily. If they hire and train a handful of teams it can scale easily to many per week. They are stacked with orders so they make money on each unit they build so they can hire as many teams as they can fit in the building or for the number of carts. A welder could certainly build a couple of carts every day. The Chinese may indeed use assembly lines but they would not be long ones for the Solo.

  2. oiaohm says:

    Grece a new prototype model of that citrus cherry picker takes about 48 hours of work to produce manually. But once in production they produce 400 in 4 days.

    The first one that is right has to be dissembled to make the jigs/templates. So its way faster to copy something than it is to produce something from scratch. So large prototype production time is not a major problem. Those jigs and templates save massive amounts of time.

  3. oiaohm says:

    What does picking fruit have to do with building a car numb nuts?
    Grece 3 wheels weights weights more than the solo has more complex hydraulics and air systems than the solo. Has more frame-welding than the solo. Does not have the fancy skin of the solo..

    Building a machine is building machine. You are the idiot here who has never worked with prototype and production lines to have anywhere near a clue what the maths are.

    They citrus tree cherry pickers are fun to drive. All by foot peddles no hand controls. You hands are free for air secateurs and chainsaws.

  4. Grece says:

    What does picking fruit have to do with building a car numb nuts?

  5. oiaohm says:

    Grece what too dumb to read as well????

  6. oiaohm says:

    Grece the scary figure is a prototype without jigs and other mass production short cuts takes between 10 to 30 times longer to assemble. So if they can assemble 1 in a day being a 10h day while prototyping in production mass production 1 hour. All that measuring and checking you are doing in one off custom builds is removed by the jigs you line up that instantly show you that everything is right or wrong saving a huge amount of time.

    I know these figures from taking part in building not a car but like a cherry picker designed for working around citrus trees for pruning. Where once per year there will be a mass order to replace all the broken ones as all of them line up to do major pruning around the same time. Being able to produce 100 per day kind of important with the templates sitting on the shelf for 51 out of 52 weeks of the year. So it fairly much get the templates down prep the production line in the first 2 days produce for another 4 days and last day pack everything back away and clear the space for something else to be built. So its a production line that lasts exactly 1 week per year covering set-up and clean up. Changing production lines in a workspace does not really suite robots.

  7. Grece says:

    Gibberish Fifi, everything you stated is gibberish.

    Have you ever thought of perhaps starting a career as a network printer? You both accomplish the same thing when improper drivers are used. Put that brain of yours to work! Careful though, the office space fella’s may take a bat to your feeble head due from too many PC LOAD LETTER errors.

  8. oiaohm says:

    Oh?…for small show as they have, how in the hell would they get one-hundred vehicles built per day. When they can’t even build one per day?

    While in prototyping you are wasting a lot of time measuring.

    In all seriousness, they are not even at the levels of the Ford assembly line, which achieved one car built every 93-minutes. Lets suppose Intermeccanica runs production at three shifts 24 hours a day. Even at that level, they would ONLY achieve fifteen vehicles a day, maximum
    All that maths is wrong. Ford with 93 minute end to end of the production line but a complete car was coming out every 10-15 mins and a new car was being started every 10 to 15 mins.

    So it all about production line. Time is overlapped. A big mack truck rolls of end of production line every 15 mins. Even that it total production time in the production line is hours.

    Why I said 100+ is with the size location and the size of the Solo there is room for two production lines. So 50 per production line per day with time overlap is not hard to achieve using human labour. 100 is possible with human labour but you have to optimise that each stop in the production line takes about 10 mins.

    So 93min built becomes a 10 step production line. So a new car is started every 10 mins at the same time a new car is completed.

    The 10-20 times the space its to allow the time to be broken into steps to get faster production. 10 steps off to the side could be for assembling engine/batteries or something complex.

    Grece before you reply again get some basic clues about production line maths.

  9. oiaohm says:

    Human driven production like is the size of vehicle x by 10-20.

    No doubt you have a linkie for this particular piece of gibberish, Fifi. Or possibly even a translation into understandable English
    DrLoser ask again using my handle asking Fifi is not here to answer you. It is straight forwards english by the way its just that you are a idiot that you don’t get it. The maths apply to building a helicopter a truck of a push-bike. Only thing that should be tripping you up is size of vehicle is road standards size of vehicle. So a push bike is the area of space with a rider taken out to a general box if you don’t size like road standard the maths does not add up.

    Really I am sick of you calling stuff gibberish because you are just too dumb to understand it and not being polite and ask for it simplified.

  10. Grece wrote, “for small show as they have, how in the hell would they get one-hundred vehicles built per day. When they can’t even build one per day?”

    Think China. The guys they are partnering with make millions of motorcycles per annum. That’s ~1K per day. A hundred cars only a bit larger is not a problem for them. They also use parallel processing just like the guys who built my alternator and roto-tiller. Well, they didn’t build that tiller. They sent me the parts… It think the cars will be shipped fully assembled though. Maybe the Canadians will get to install the wheels or remove the wrapping.

  11. Grece says:

    100+ per day would be possible

    Oh?…for small show as they have, how in the hell would they get one-hundred vehicles built per day. When they can’t even build one per day? In all seriousness, they are not even at the levels of the Ford assembly line, which achieved one car built every 93-minutes. Lets suppose Intermeccanica runs production at three shifts 24 hours a day. Even at that level, they would ONLY achieve fifteen vehicles a day, maximum. Conversely, this is assuming that they can meet a build goal of 93-minutes per vehicle, which is rather dubious I would say.

    One hundred per day? Fake Ohm talking out his ass it seems!

  12. DrLoser says:

    Human driven production like is the size of vehicle x by 10-20.

    No doubt you have a linkie for this particular piece of gibberish, Fifi. Or possibly even a translation into understandable English.

  13. oiaohm says:

    Intermeccanica does have two production styles as well. There are no custom platform to move/contruct the chassis yet. That comes after the car is certified as exactly right for the road.

    The jigs and platforms speed up production a lot even without a production line by cutting down manual measuring. Basically the photos look exactly what you expect from an Intermeccanica prototype building stages including the level of mess.

    Human driven production like is the size of vehicle x by 10-20. The photos shows enough space to-do that for something the size of the solo. So 100+ per day would be possible in the space photoed on facebook. Again its all about how effective of systems they implement.

  14. oiaohm wrote, “Until then you use what ever hacked up construction method that works.”

    Electra Meccanica is using the production system of Meccanica: instead of an assembly line, there are a few carts upon which each unit is built. That works just fine for a few units per week. When they finally get into bigger production they will build a few units per day in Vancouver. When they are sure they have all the bugs out and sales moving along, they will start production in China with dozens per day. It works.

  15. oiaohm says:

    Referring back to the Facebook URL, how in the hell are they going to scale up production in such atrocious conditions? I seriously doubt China is going to run with anything, why should they? If anything, they will “steal” the idea and run with it on their own, dumping Meccanica.
    Grece really prototype car conditions are atrocious normally. Until you have the design certified as road legal.

    They’ve done about all they can do until they are certified. That process is underway.

    Excuse me, certified? Whats there to certify.
    Certify that the design is road legal and passes the safety requirements. You don’t start building a production line until you know the design is road legal. Until then you use what ever hacked up construction method that works.

    Like there is no point making custom jigs and carry frames an so on if when you get to certification you find out the thing has to be longer or shorter or wider or heavier or lighter…. Also no point setting up a robot production line if something with the design is wrong because you might need a completely different robot in some parts of the production.

    I, nor anyone I have spoken with, have heard of these people. Relatively unknown in the vehicle industry.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intermeccanica
    You would be looking under the wrong name. Henry Reisner has decades of history of getting cars produced and road legal for Intermeccanica so knows all the correct processes. Including not investing too much on production equipment before design is certified.

    Grece so track record does say a legal road car will come out of it. In what volume who knows. Intermeccanica has normally been smaller volume stuff.

  16. Grece wrote, “what little I have seen to date from this project venture, little would be attractive to vendors, investors or even buyers. That is the essence of my claim.”

    They have all the investors they need at the moment. When they expand they may need more. There is a plan and it’s being executed.

  17. Grece says:

    The whole project is not in house so they can’t guarantee any timeline.

    Say what!? How can a car manufacturer not have production under their control? Imagine if Ford had to rely on China or Mexico to ship parts to them. But wait!…look at this! https://www.facebook.com/pg/EMVsolo/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1288370624590838 Seem’s these yahoo’s do a production facility, and with very recent images I might add. One had a #9 listed.

    They’ve done about all they can do until they are certified. That process is underway.

    Excuse me, certified? Whats there to certify.

    There is no reason to believe certification will fail because Meccanica and other consultants have had lots of success. These are not babes in the woods.

    I, nor anyone I have spoken with, have heard of these people. Relatively unknown in the vehicle industry.

    They will scale up production and when they’ve killed the last bug, the Chinese partner will run with it on a global scale.

    Referring back to the Facebook URL, how in the hell are they going to scale up production in such atrocious conditions? I seriously doubt China is going to run with anything, why should they? If anything, they will “steal” the idea and run with it on their own, dumping Meccanica.

    It’s gonna happen and you don’t have any basis to claim otherwise.

    You have much faith in this project, but in my experience and what little I have seen to date from this project venture, little would be attractive to vendors, investors or even buyers. That is the essence of my claim.

  18. Grece wrote, “Seems to me that this company cannot track it’s own progress. There is no consistent project management to speak of, obviously they knew there would be delays months ago, but why keep it from people?”

    The whole project is not in house so they can’t guarantee any timeline. They’ve done about all they can do until they are certified. That process is underway. There is no reason to believe certification will fail because Meccanica and other consultants have had lots of success. These are not babes in the woods. They will scale up production and when they’ve killed the last bug, the Chinese partner will run with it on a global scale. It’s gonna happen and you don’t have any basis to claim otherwise.

  19. Grece says:

    Those who put down deposits now can expect delivery after the first quarter of 2017.

    So now delivery is going to be the second quarter. This is commonly called the “first delay”, obviously no reference was made as to why. Such a wordy announcement, only 1.12% was used to mention the “first delay” and again with no explanation.

    Give this a good read: https://medium.com/kickstarter/how-zano-raised-millions-on-kickstarter-and-left-backers-with-nearly-nothing-85c0abe4a6cb

    Seems to me that this company cannot track it’s own progress. There is no consistent project management to speak of, obviously they knew there would be delays months ago, but why keep it from people? Being a PM by trade, had I withheld information to the stakeholders, that their project is being delayed for months, my ass would be grilled and fired, to suffer possible liquidated damages.

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