Battery Technology Advances

“A new glass electrolyte-based solid-state battery has been developed by the researchers at UT Austin. Led by the Li-ion battery inventor John Goodenough, the team demonstrated that their battery is better than Li-ion. It can hold an almost 3x charge, has more charging cycles, supports fast charging, and isn’t prone to catch fire.”
 
See Li-Ion Battery Inventor Creates Breakthrough Solid-State Battery, Holds 3X Charge
Amen! If the Solo EV can make me happy with current technology, imagine me in a Solo with this new battery technology when my current battery dies… 3X the distance? Yes! Lower operating temperatures? Yes! Longer life? Perhaps not so important, considering my age, but OK! I’ll take that.

Let’s hope the holders of the patent don’t lock it up too tightly…

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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19 Responses to Battery Technology Advances

  1. oiaohm says:

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Tables/rstiv.html

    Glass has a resistance between 1 Ohm to 10000 Ohms per metre not temperature sensitive either all depends on the mix of glass and what impurities are in it.

    Glass covers that many different things. All Glass materials are electrolytes of different grades. The higher the resistance of the glass the more molten the glass has to be to show electrolyte properties at battery voltages and currents. Solar panels were different because you had like 52V + decent amount of amps in some places. Solar panels directly output 52V disappeared wonder why at that level solid glass they were using shows its electrolyte self again.

    So enough voltage and most glass is electrolyte. Ok the glass might melt due to the resistance first if you don’t cool it. So really high resistance glass getting it to show electrolyte properties before becoming molten is hard. If you do it you will see that is it electrolyte.

    So the complete idea that glass is a normal solid is wrong. The idea that glass is not electrolyte is wrong. If you take a water based electrolyte and freeze it some of them behave like glass does all you have done is increase resistance so they cease to be a high performing electrolyte but they are still an electrolyte. Does a electrolyte have to be what we think of as a liquid no.

  2. oiaohm says:

    With which I concur. You can call glass anything at all, but unless you can define its material properties in any reasonable way, it is not an electrolyte. Which was, I think, Tarek’s point.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolyte
    Hot, softened glass is an electrolytic conductor, and some glass manufacturers keep the glass molten by passing a large current through it.

    Reality is molten glass has been known as a electrolyte since for ever. The fact glass has part crystal structure is because if its electrolyte properties.

    You can? You can? Then by all means, go to it, you inspirational little transvestite in a red leather mini-skirt! Find that cite!
    Insult forget asking for cite if you are doing that.

    That cite that you don’t have now because you insulted me DrLoser. Show that the electrolyte properties of glass did not stop because it was in the state we presumed was solid. So you have a electrolyte that is crappy now you need to find the right items to add to it so it performs well.

    Basically I believe DrLoser has the cite and insulted me so I will not present it.

    Everything you have said it without cites so where is your cites that solid glass is not a electrolyte let me have fun pull you to bits. Basically DrLoser it put up or shut up time.

  3. DrLoser wrote, “Why did you ban him, just when he was starting to make sense?”

    He was advocating crime against humanity. I don’t want anything to do with that and it’s probably a crime just to have it on the website. My father risked his life to fight such stuff. The least I can do is block it. I apologize to those who were offended before I saw it.

  4. DrLoser wrote, “it is possible to justify various different views that it is a highly viscous liquid, an amorphous solid, or simply that glass is another state of matter that is neither liquid nor solid. The difference is semantic.”

    Clearly, that’s wrong. Amorphous solids don’t transmit light worth a damn except in very thin layers. Window glass will transmit light very well even a foot thick. I’ve seen it BTW…

  5. DrLoser says:

    I miss Douglas, Robert, by the way.

    Why did you ban him, just when he was starting to make sense?

    Do you have that much of a problem by being contradicted, with evidence to back the contrary argument up?

    Hardly in the spirit of FLOSS now, is it?

  6. DrLoser says:

    Terrific little effort there, Fifi, and I applaud your trivial effort to point out that glass is often considered as a liquid of some form, but of course you know better.

    To quote a cite I won’t bother you with, any more than you bother us with cites that have any relevance:

    There is no clear answer to the question “Is glass solid or liquid?”. In terms of molecular dynamics and thermodynamics it is possible to justify various different views that it is a highly viscous liquid, an amorphous solid, or simply that glass is another state of matter that is neither liquid nor solid. The difference is semantic. In terms of its material properties we can do little better. There is no clear definition of the distinction between solids and highly viscous liquids. All such phases or states of matter are idealisations of real material properties.

    With which I concur. You can call glass anything at all, but unless you can define its material properties in any reasonable way, it is not an electrolyte. Which was, I think, Tarek’s point.

    Fool.

    Tarek Fatah if I could find the paper there was study into how solar cells were shorting out and failing.

    You can? You can? Then by all means, go to it, you inspirational little transvestite in a red leather mini-skirt! Find that cite!

    Did I say “inspirational?” Oh, sorry. I meant “pathetically ignorant.” And also “a twit trying to change the subject.”

    I’ll try to be more accurate next time.

  7. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “Mr. Pogson, excuse please. I did not ask you. But let me make some correction to your words.”

    Welcome back Dougie 😉

  8. oiaohm says:

    Glass is not a liquid, it is a solid. Try and shove hand through windshield, I bet it will hurt, so tell me it is not solid. I laugh.
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-fiction-glass-liquid/
    Reality is fiction that glass is a solid or a liquid. Its a odd state between both with properties of both that show under different conditions. So between two plates in a battery it behaves more like a liquid with a very high viscous state. Your windshield example it behaving more like a solid. Glass is a material state all of it own. Glass does not meet all the properties to be called a solid and does not meet all the properties to be called a liquid.

    Tarek Fatah but thank your for the laugh at how foolish people are on this topic. Also glass is a stack of different materials Some forms are glass have properties closer to solid than liquid and the reverse.

    Its taken a lot of work to get glass electrolyte to work. Yes attempt to use glass as an electrolyte when you get it wrong proves glass is more a liquid than a solid. If you find some of the failures you have dendrite growth going straight through the glass and shorting out the plates as if it was a liquid not a solid.

    Tarek Fatah if I could find the paper there was study into how solar cells were shorting out and failing. Dendrite growth through glass was a major cause of solar cell failure in some of the early solar cells. This failure lead to research into using glass as an electrolyte because the failure was only possible because glass was behaving like an electrolyte. If you can get glass electrolyte to work you don’t have to worry about electrolyte leaking was the idea. Now this might turn out to be true we might have leak proof batteries.

    There is another idiot statement windshield is not pure glass Tarek Fatah its plastic laminated glass. The glass used in car windows is called safety glass and is the closest to solid glass you can have. There is more than 1 type of glass. If you drop a sheet of wind glass and drop a sheet of safety glass the result is massively different. Of course the glass used in a battery is not going to be the same mix used in a window or safety glass. All of them will have the same basic core properties because they are glass but how far a glass is bias to solid properties or liquid properties alters a lot with the different mixes.

  9. Tarek Fatah wrote, “Any material melts at various temperatures, depending on it’s composition.”

    Normally, pure substances melt at specific temperatures. Glasses do not. They become soft long before they melt and they will flow with decreasing viscosity as temperature rises. It’s just their nature. Waxes have the same tendency. Ice does not. It melts sharply at ~0C.

    Glass may conduct electricity when it is in a thin layer. Conduction becomes a process of diffusion of charge carriers. Compare a block of wood and a sheet of paper. One can use paper to separate the plates in a galvanic cell. A block of wood would severely reduce the current if any. Wood and paper are the same substance except paper is thinner.

  10. Tarek Fatah says:

    Mr. Pogson, excuse please. I did not ask you. But let me make some correction to your words.

    Ok, here we go.

    Heating up glass in a battery, is not how the technology works. Truth be told, anything can be heated up and be conductive. Molten rock is good example.

    Yes, glass is semiconductor, silicon is what is used in computer chips, but here we talking battery, ok?

    Glass is not a liquid, it is a solid. Try and shove hand through windshield, I bet it will hurt, so tell me it is not solid. I laugh.

    Your last statement make no sense. Any material melts at various temperatures, depending on it’s composition.

    Yes, solar cells, but they are not batteries ok? We talk batteries, I ask Mr. Oiaohm.

  11. Tarek Fatah wrote, “can you please explain this glass electrolyte”.

    Ordinarily, glass we see around us is an insulator, incapable of carrying a current of electricity. Heat it up or make it in a very thin layer, and it’s characteristics change completely. Heated up, it can carry currents just like a liquid electrolyte by dissolving ions and allowing them to drift under electric forces. In a thin layer, glasses can conduct much like a semiconductor. Thick, solid glass, BTW, is not actually solid, but a very viscous liquid. It has no definite melting point and can flow over a wide range of temperatures well above room temperature.

    Common examples of electrically conductive glasses occur in photovoltaic cells. There a thin deposit of a metallic oxide, which is normally insulating is rendered conductive by doping with Fluorine or other electronegative element. See Deposition of Transparent Conducting Oxides For Photocells.

  12. Tarek Fatah says:

    Mr Oiaohm, can you please explain this glass electrolyte? Glass is a solid, an electrolyte is a liquid or gel that contains ions and can be decomposed by electrolysis.

  13. ram wrote, “where is the border between “super capacitors” and “batteries” ???”

    The ancient aluminium electrolytics were somewhat like batteries but they weren’t too “super”. I think galvanic cells will be the norm for decades to come. Super capacitors and fuel-cells are still somewhat encumbered. NimH, NiFe and other newer cells all have advantages. The Solo use Li cells but I think NimH will be advantageous eventually because of the potentially lower cost. Li is scarce. Ni is expensive because it has many other uses. Supercapacitors are used in many regenerative braking systems because they charge and discharge more rapidly than batteries.

  14. ram says:

    So where is the border between “super capacitors” and “batteries” ???

  15. oiaohm says:

    dougman really please get you fact at least somewhere near right.

    Glass electrolyte is a fairly new thing. The first attempts were in fact ceramic because Glass was thought not to be usable. Before 2002 you don’t find any Glass electrolyte batteries unless you say Photo Voltaic cells are batteries that are not rechargeable. So this is absolutely not 50 year old technology. But using this technology should not mean rebuilding production lines from scratch.

    Betavoltaic battery is very restricted due to means to make dirty bombs out of them.
    http://energyfromthorium.com/2014/04/13/mythology-thorium-car-thorium-plasma-batteries/
    Thorium batteries are basically fiction. There are such things as Thorium reactors.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorium-based_nuclear_power
    They are absolutely not household or heavily used in military.

    plasma battery what one. There is a lot of fiction with only a few real examples that make recharging alkaline batteries look profitable.

    dougman do some research instead of making crap up.

  16. dougman says:

    “Let’s hope the holders of the patent don’t lock it up too tightly…”

    You sir are clueless. This technology has been out at least 50-years, but no one will use it for another twenty. Traditionally, the military has funded pioneering Research & Development (R&D). Eventually, these technological breakthroughs would be transferred to the civilian market. The Internet and personal computers are examples of this paradigm.

  17. kurkosdr says:

    Can’t wait for Qualcomm to try and “utilize” those extra mah by releasing processors that make the phone so hot you ‘ll need oven gloves to touch it…

  18. ram says:

    Patents don’t do squat to prevent infringement, especially by government supported entities. For around $200 (less in bulk) they can set up corporations to infringe a patent. The patent holder had to spend (at least) $1 million to even start a defense. The usually foreign owned front company folds when the legal papers are filed and another pops up, rinse repeat. My company ran into this with the French government. No company can fight a major government. Patent — shmatent!

  19. dougman says:

    Pogsey, just hook yourself up a betavoltaic battery, even better what about one of them new-fangled thorium batteries or even a plasma battery. They have them flying off the shelves down south at the local truck stop.

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