I’m a Linux Geek And Proud Of It

“While Linux is certainly very easy to use, there are some activities surrounding it that are seen as more complex than others. While they can be all be avoided easily enough, they do have a certain, geeky appeal. How many of them do you follow?”
 
See 5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek
TFA spells out 5 signs of GNU/Linux geekiness. I bear 4 of them. There’s no doubt then, that I’m a GNU/Linux geek.

I’m proud of that. At first acquiring knowledge of GNU/Linux was for survival, a way to escape crashing of Lose ’95. Then it was enlightment. I actually ready the EULA from Hell versus the GPL. Then I tried several distros each with their own ways of doing things, all geeky. Finally, I settled on Debian GNU/Linux. It celebrates diversity and whether you are a geek or not you can install, run, and be happy with your IT. I love it.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in Linux in Education, Teaching, technology and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to I’m a Linux Geek And Proud Of It

  1. ram says:

    Debian Linux and Linux Mint work for my companies. Never, ever, had a crash. We are running many thousands of cores and dozens of servers.

  2. oiaohm says:

    Really DrLoser you are saying a lot of TMR garbage. They made a list of what defined a Linux Retard that turned out that if you in fact looked at Windows you found Windows users doing lots of the same things. So this now puts force on users to operate in less effective ways.

    You write your own shell scripts. Once again, except under duress, this is not the sign of a Linux Geek. It is the sign of a Linux Retard. Use a proper scripting language like Python, for God’s sake … Perl, if you insist. If you can write a bash script, you can write a Perl script.
    DrLoser another stupid saying. If a person can write bash does not mean they should even attempt coding in Perl.
    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1132135/is-perl-faster-than-bash
    People can write complex bash without working too hard because it like what they use on the command line all the time.

    Perl since it not something that use all the time. They are a lot more buggy with it.

    Would you say to all the Windows users who write .cmd files that they are Retards. Thinking this would be insulting many personal at Microsoft.

    DrLoser you are Retard who has not done proper homework to work out what kinds of actions are universal to users using Windows, Linux and OS X. Writing script based on the default console shell happens on all 3. Find these things in program build scripts is highly common. Finding these things in Microsoft books for administrators is also highly common.

    So if Robert is a retard on a lot of those point so are many Windows System Administrators. DrLoser you need to shorten list a lot.

  3. oiaohm says:

    4. You know how to use Vi or Emacs. Look at me! I’m a Double Geek! Actually, anybody who insists on using Vi is a Linux Retard … I may have mentioned this term once or twice earlier. And, Robert, can you use Emacs?
    Really you need to drop that one DrLoser there was a survey done at Linux conference is less than 1/10 of the people who were developers knew how to use either Vi or Emacs you had better chance that someone would know Eclipse. For all the effort different Univeresity have pushed vi and emacs it they have surprising low real world usage even with Geeks. To be shocking collage students were known for using those.

    1. The terminal is your file manager. I may be accused of many an anti-Linux rant, but even I think this is more like the sign of a Linux Retard. There is absolutely nothing wrong with file manager GUIs on Linux.
    This one there is a few things missing. Like under windows you need to modify system files you can grant a file manager more permissions to-do that without moving the complete application to running with higher privileges.

    The fact the Linux command line works means a lot of things are done that way. To different Linux graphical file managers providing terminals integrated. This is different to windows unless you use third party file managers.

    DrLoser it one of these interesting facts many windows users pay for a file manager with integrated terminal because they can get around faster using terminal than mouse. So nothing wrong with graphical file mangers is not true when you look a UX studies. Please note a graphical file manger is worthless to a person that is blind. Yet a blind who has to have the text in a file read to him/her can out run a visual person using a mouse and a graphical file manager you have to think about is this the right solution.

    DrLoser is a retard who has not done any UX study to understand that there are people even under windows who will drop to CMD because it faster to get stuff done than using the graphical. Of course there is another group of people who its faster to use the graphical than use terminal/console because they can not remember the commands to use. This feature does not make you a Linux Retard. Your choice should be based on how your brain works if you are terminal/console dominate or graphical dominate. Windows attempts 1 size fits all a lot. The idea of 1 size of shoe for everyone we would see as insane. No two human brains are absolutely identical yet we try 1 size fit all.

  4. DrLoser wrote, “TLW, who I expect can trivially tell the difference between 4.4.41 and 4.4.50”.

    No, the new kernels are mostly for my peace of mind, being aware TLW has no sense of security whatsoever. A vulnerability in the kernel is the last thing I need.

  5. DrLoser wrote, “when are you going to confiscate that “nice fat Intel CPU” and replace it with something more “geeky” like an Arm-based thin client?”

    I plan to buy a couple of Odroid-C2s to be my own client and to replace an ancient Atom. TLW is working on destroying the big Intel-inside notebook as fast as she can. She keeps laying it on the floor, letting grand daughters play with it etc. It’s lost five key-caps so far and yesterday she tripped over the power-cord. The jack for power on the notebook is definitely out of shape but it still works. I doubt it will last six months. I will get a better wireless keyboard for the machine in the living room and she will likely use that. I think TLW destroys one perfectly good device every year or two. She really boosts the economy but it is very doubtful Intel will supply the replacement.

  6. DrLoser says:

    As a Linux Retard, btw, when are you going to confiscate that “nice fat Intel CPU” and replace it with something more “geeky” like an Arm-based thin client?

    You’re not going to do that, are you?

    Even as a Linux Retard, you’re not up to much.

  7. DrLoser says:

    I’m also building her a new kernel on that nice fat Intel CPU. She was running 4.4.41 but now she will have 4.4.50.

    A desiderata much to be applauded by TLW, who I expect can trivially tell the difference between 4.4.41 and 4.4.50.

    You may remember that I pointed out your “main claim” to being a “Linux Geek,” Robert — which is your feeble-minded self-indulgence in spinning up a new point version of the kernel every week or so.

    It’s the sign of a Linux Retard, I’m telling you.

  8. DrLoser says:

    Nope. TLW was away and her notebook’s network connection was up so I sshed in and tweaked her configuration. I made the multi-user target depend on wicd.service.

    Isn’t that special? No, it isn’t. Not at all. Five minutes work for anybody who can edit a conf file.

    I’m calling you out on this, Robert. You, yes you, are a Linux Retard.

    And I base that judgement solely on the five points in the article you cite.

  9. DrLoser wrote, “You really don’t seem to understand the system very well (cf systemd and various other cockups)”.

    Nope. TLW was away and her notebook’s network connection was up so I sshed in and tweaked her configuration. I made the multi-user target depend on wicd.service. Now the network comes up properly, her NFS shares mount and she automatically logs in on boot. I’d say I understood something to make that happen. If systemd were as wonderful as it’s made out to be, I wouldn’t have had to do all that… After the system survived reboot, I’m also building her a new kernel on that nice fat Intel CPU. She was running 4.4.41 but now she will have 4.4.50. I hope she appreciates my skill.

  10. DrLoser wrote, “There is absolutely nothing wrong with file manager GUIs on Linux.”

    Of course there is. Just displaying a directory with thousands of files just wastes time. Most of that work is a waste because the user is probably wanting to see something like /home/pogson/Documents/*frog*pdf instead of /home/pogson/Documents/*. I’ll grant the GUI is nice for navigating nests of directories but not piles of files.

    Further, “configure/make” is not much of a package manager. Think APT. If you stay inside a distro like Debian, APT is all you need and it is very powerful, flexible and fast. It’s also useful for a geek to query the package manager to learn about something or to find something on the system in an intelligent manner.

    Further, DrLoser seems to decry shell scripting in favour of python or other interpreter. I fail to see the point. Anyone who does either or both of those is pretty geeky. I also use PASCAL…

    No, I don’t use EMACS. Too verbose an environment. I am a simple man. I only use a subset of vi, usually vi-minimal or whatever is the least I can install.

    I don’t use any of point 5 but I have plenty of other fixations, like ssh and LTSP. I think that compensates. Some have even called Debian geeky although I don’t think that’s accurate. It’s an ideal distro for geeks but also for ordinary mortals.

    I would add point 6. “You’re always the one talking about */Linux, computers, networks, caches, CPUs, etc, even at a party of ordinary non-geeks. Mostly other folks listen because they are polite and amazed by the passion of the geek in you.”. I get extra geek credits on this one…

  11. DrLoser says:

    Let’s examine the “geek interest level” to a geek of these five points, shall we?

    1. The terminal is your file manager. I may be accused of many an anti-Linux rant, but even I think this is more like the sign of a Linux Retard. There is absolutely nothing wrong with file manager GUIs on Linux.

    2. Using your package manager is child’s play. Except when it’s not, incidentally. Never mind: configure, make, make install work — and btw that is what a Linux Geek (like me, apparently) does. A basic necessity to run your OS does not make you a Geek.

    3. You write your own shell scripts. Once again, except under duress, this is not the sign of a Linux Geek. It is the sign of a Linux Retard. Use a proper scripting language like Python, for God’s sake … Perl, if you insist. If you can write a bash script, you can write a Perl script.

    4. You know how to use Vi or Emacs. Look at me! I’m a Double Geek! Actually, anybody who insists on using Vi is a Linux Retard … I may have mentioned this term once or twice earlier. And, Robert, can you use Emacs?

    5. You’re using LFS, Gentoo, or Arch. Finally, something that is properly perfumed with Geek. Except that you don’t use any of those, do you, Robert?

    Sorry, old man. You were a Linux Retard when you started, all those years ago.

    And you’re still a Linux Retard even now.
    3.

  12. DrLoser says:

    It’s not entirely clear that you are a Linux Geek, Robert. You really don’t seem to understand the system very well (cf systemd and various other cockups), and you’ve never contributed a single line of code … well, you’ve contributed quite a lot of whining on Bugzillas, but that doesn’t qualify you as a Linux Geek, more as a Linux Fishwife.

    Spinning up a new point version of the kernel every week or so doesn’t qualify you as a geek … or perhaps only the sort of geek that bites the heads of chickens, just because.

  13. Deaf Spy wrote, “they should definitely include systemd into the list”.

    I don’t think so. It’s definitely possible to install and use a system with systemd and never need to touch it. The defaults should work for most desktop users for instance. Where systemd gets into trouble is when something unusual is done like running some service that’s unusual with a desktop or networking. OTOH, the five items listed could be interesting to a geek on any GNU/Linux system. It’s geeky alright, but not an essential part of being geeky. You could list 10K items in the list if you include secondary geekiness. In the years systemd has been around I’ve only had problems with it twice: running apache on a desktop and wireless NFS mounting of /home/$USER and I’m pretty geeky by any measure. People phone me up to ask questions about stuff I studied 45 years ago because they know I’m a geek and care about such stuff. They even do that instead of using Google. Some have suggested MrGoogle should be my name when it comes to geekdom.

  14. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “Finally, I settled on Debian GNU/Linux. It celebrates diversity and whether you are a geek or not you can install, run, and be happy with your IT. I love it.”

    And I love that I can finally get to curating my musical compositions written and realized using Finale and the Vienna Symphonic Library. My new dell xps 8900 running windows 10 provides a solid and responsive platform for my work.

    Of course I’ve installed CentOS 7 on a virtual machine just to keep my sysadmin skills current. Beyond that its not very useful to me.
    It all good…

  15. Deaf Spy says:

    Hm, they should definitely include systemd into the list.

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