LibreOffice 5.3 Is Here

You can grab the release notes and be amazed.

What I noticed right away is that there are now proper styles for tables in Calc and that there is an accompanying application to run on a server for on-line/collaborative editing. WhooHoo! Enjoy.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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26 Responses to LibreOffice 5.3 Is Here

  1. oiaohm says:

    I put the dot in there so the blog’s flter won’t catch the link and mark it as “waiting for approval”, and the rest of your post is garbage because the tool should have warned me to uninstall 5.2 first if a clash could arise. Why didn’t it do that? What is this? The work-to-rule OS?
    https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Installing_in_parallel/Windows

    kurkosdr don’t give me this bull crap. The reality is installing more than 1 version under windows you have to-do thing particular ways or end up with clash between them. This is true be it Libreoffice or MS Office.

    Sorry you want to say that what I said was wrong because admitting you were incompetent does not help you case as well. The reality if you had chosen either the snap or the flatpak solution you would not had conflit with installed version.

    So the day flatpak is properly ready your complains will be dead in the water kurkosdr should be this year.

  2. Deaf Spy wrote, “you were doing so many floating-point computations back in those days that absolutely required the FPU. Right?”

    I was doing ballistics calculations that took ~20 minutes on the previous 8-bit machine. The 486DX met my needs until ~2000 when it was dropped at an airport and wrecked. A loose hard drive crashed right through the motherboard. My replacement was an AMD Duron, ISTR. It was OK but kept crashing with TOOS, hence GNU/Linux came to my rescue. TLW used TOOS until I retired and I refused to keep delousing it.

  3. kurkosdr says:

    Of course you put (dot) in the link to that people would not notice you followed the instructions for only 1 version at a time

    I put the dot in there so the blog’s flter won’t catch the link and mark it as “waiting for approval”, and the rest of your post is garbage because the tool should have warned me to uninstall 5.2 first if a clash could arise. Why didn’t it do that? What is this? The work-to-rule OS?

  4. Deaf Spy says:

    It was an Intel 486DX, and yes, I did check out all the specs and preferred the better 486 model over the SX.

    Don’t you say, Robert! You managed to compare 486 DX vs SX all by yourself! I am filled with awe!

    Of course, I am pretty certain you were doing so many floating-point computations back in those days that absolutely required the FPU. Right?

  5. DrLoser wrote, “none of those skills”.

    Chuckle. I’ve been making things for many decades. Just check out my thesis. I made the device, all the electronics for it and the software to analyze the data it generated. I’ve not bought a legacy PC since 1992. I’ve built all my own since then. It was an Intel 486DX, and yes, I did check out all the specs and preferred the better 486 model over the SX. Unfortunately, I used Lose 3.1. If I’d been alert I would have installed Debian which came out just a year later. Too bad I wasted my time on DOS.

  6. DrLoser says:

    Oh yeah, buy from those no-name companies, go ahead. Did you receive your Cello last month? Did it have a working PCI-E?

    Highly unlikely, Kurks. Robert is feebly attempting to redirect our attention to DIYers. And there are indeed companies that provide rudimentary boards for those who have DIY skills in the hardware and firmware and software department.

    Robert, of course, has none of those skills.

    He’s more reliant on GSOTDIFY. (“Get somebody else to do it for you.”)

  7. oiaohm says:

    kurkosdr Its not like using the deb file is the only option any more. Yes by using the snap or flatpak you leave you system wide libreoffice untouched. Yes snap and flatpak options do install on mint.

    Also if you had read the instructions you said you followed removing the 5.2 was required for 5.3 to work.
    http://libre-software.net/how-to-install-libreoffice-on-ubuntu-linux-mint/
    To remove prior installations of LibreOffice:
    sudo apt-get remove libreoffice-core

    Of course you put (dot) in the link to that people would not notice you followed the instructions for only 1 version at a time. Yes the reverse is true you have 5.3 installed and attempt to work 5.2 bad things happen as well from the deb packages.

    I would say someone skipped a step then complains that a install broken.

    I just get a standalone exe/msi or apk and that’s it.
    If that is what you want you want snap files or flatpak or appimage.
    http://download.documentfoundation.org/libreoffice/flatpak/
    Flatpak I wish they would fix 1 bug being not working with Nvidia closed source drivers without messing around. As soon solution to that exists this complaint will be 100 percent dead in the water.

    Both flatpak and snap options are mentioned the Libreoffice download page. So taking on deb dependency hell is your choice. You might wonder why a flatpak or a snap install can make 1G of harddrive disappear for each copy of Libreoffice. Yes installing the deb files correctly use less disc space at the price of only having 1 version.

    In effect you can have 3 different versions of libreoffice installed. 1 distrobution, 1 snappy and 1 flatpak and have them all get along.

    The key feature of flatpak is the ability to install multi versions of same program. This is why its annoying having to run a custom script to update nvidia libraries for flatpak applications every time Nvidia driver updates. Ubuntu with snap made it simple to have 1 extra to the system provided.

    Then there is ChromeOS, if you consider it a different OS, in the sense Intel has to curate releases for it and make sure it is better-tested compared to other Desktop Linuxes.
    Not true. Best tested intel Linux is something called Clear Linux. Chrome-OS for intel platforms is rebased off clear linux every so often. Clear Linux is made by intel themselves.
    https://clearlinux.org/blogs/clarity-desktop

    Yes intel makes Clear Linux for high end processing servers but it also a desktop Linux. Now not the most friendly desktop Linux.

    AMD has already quit Desktop Linux
    Not true. AMD cannot quit the Linux desktop. Reality is high end servers these days using GPU for acceleration require the same features you need to operate a Linux Desktop. So are you saying AMD has given up all hope of high end server market. The reality is Linux Desktop and High end server are one and the same from software development.

    Intel is in the same boat. Anyone wanting into the high end server market these days requires GPU acceleration to work. Arm vendors interested in Linux Server have also put out desktop products.

    Something to remember you want to debug something is a lot simpler if you can do it on the equal hardware with a keyboard mouse and screen than remotely.

  8. kurkosdr says:

    I don’t see that. There are a bunch of companies making motherboards for DIYers. There are still a bunch contributing to Linux. I think there is no mechanism to shut down the companies who cooperate with FLOSSies.

    Oh yeah, buy from those no-name companies, go ahead. Did you receive your Cello last month? Did it have a working PCI-E?

  9. kurkosdr wrote, “The money involved in locked bootloaders (on PC and ARM) and the money involved in locking bootloaders tying software to hardware and vise-versa is too much and those egghead CEOs won’t abandon that goal just because of some retired teacher’s desire to run an 1-2%er OS.”

    I don’t see that. There are a bunch of companies making motherboards for DIYers. There are still a bunch contributing to Linux. I think there is no mechanism to shut down the companies who cooperate with FLOSSies.

  10. kurkosdr says:

    I mean… just look what Android did to smartphones. Remember the days you could just by some device like the Nokia N900, or the Samsung H1, the Nokia N9 or the Jolla Phone that run your little 1-2%er desktop linux desktop OS?

    Where are such smartphones now? It’s all Android wall-to-wall.

    Expect the same to happen to desktops once Google gives Chrome OS the ability to run Android apps.

  11. kurkosdr says:

    To make sure you got the message, let me elaborate: The egalitarian world of “PC architecture” where everyone is welcome to bring his own OS that you ‘ve enjoyed so far is drawing to an end. Bootloaders are being locked and software is tied to hardware and vise-versa. Companies keep drivers as a way of determining which OS your hardware can run because they have new chips to sells and the old ones are stubbornly well-performing:
    arstechnica(dot)co(dot)uk/gadgets/2016/08/why-isnt-your-old-phone-getting-android-7/

    The money involved in locked bootloaders (on PC and ARM) and the money involved in locking bootloaders tying software to hardware and vise-versa is too much and those egghead CEOs won’t abandon that goal just because of some retired teacher’s desire to run an 1-2%er OS.

    Start switching to Android and Chrome OS. You ‘ve been warned.

  12. kurkosdr says:

    Well, if I want the latest version, I can type a command or two and get it done. I could create a little script and have it down to one command. It’s all good. As I recall, it’s three “untar”s and “dpkg”s so I could create a command like “installLO version” and make it happen. I could probably throw in the download and hash-verification too. I don’t bother because it’s of no concern. I’m retired. A bit of typing makes me feel useful.

    I won’t comment on the absurdity of the statement (aka that typing obscure commands gives you a sense of achievement) I will comment on the fact you forgot to comment that the commands users are supposed to type are often wrong. Aka they don’t do what you want.

    I executed these instructions:
    libre-software(dot)net/how-to-install-libreoffice-on-ubuntu-linux-mint/

    down to the letter, and I got one copy of libreoffice 5.2.5 and copy of libreoffice 5.3, only that I can’t make any document open with 5.3, so I use only 5.2.5

    The omgubuntu instructions got me a broken version of libreoffice where clicking to create a writer document did nothing, and opening an odt opened a blank recovery window (without recovering anything).

    I do not want to know what went wrong (though I suspect the dependency hell misfeatures of dpkg are to blame). I am not paid for that. What I can tell you is that I ‘ve never had any problem installing LIbreOffice on Windows or LibreOffice Reader on Android. I just get a standalone exe/msi or apk and that’s it. That’s what most users like me want. So, I naturally gravitate towards those OSes.

    The era you would get shamed on tech circles for not working around bugs and misdesigns (like dpkg’s byzantine dependency-hell) is over. People moved on.

    But anyway Pog, enjoy your 1-2%er OS while you still can. Just be advised: Intel already has to support 4 kinds of gpu drivers: Windows, MacOS X, Android and Desktop Linux. Then there is ChromeOS, if you consider it a different OS, in the sense Intel has to curate releases for it and make sure it is better-tested compared to other Desktop Linuxes. With Intel being pressured by investors to do something to crack themselves in the Android and ChromeOS land and by extension do something about the hot mess that is their Android drivers and ChromeOS drivers, they might ditch the liability that is non-ChromeOS Desktop Linux and move the programmers someone else. AMD has already quit Desktop Linux and Nvidia isn’t interested anymore because SteamOS isn’t getting anywhere. ARM vendors never really supported Desktop Linux, just Android. Microsoft is pressuring the motherboard manufacturers to make secure boot a standard malfeature and Google is pressuring SoC vendors to Knox-ify their SoCs.

    Pog, you may soon run out of hardware to run your 1%er OS on. You still can’t see it because all the companies I mentioned above still pretend Desktop Linux has a place, because Chrome OS with the ability to run Android apps has not yet being released.

  13. DrLoser wrote, “Have you, personally, ever felt the need for on-line/collaborative editing of a spread-sheet? The answer is, of course, no.”

    I’ve worked on scientific projects that spanned continents. Instead of paper correspondence and draftine/redrafting typewritten stuff, we could have hashed out tabular data and written text based on that. “Point-form” stuff I called it back then. Businesses which are diverse may well want such options, say, at a meeting, each department-head adding in his result. While I don’t think such stuff is essential it could definitely be useful and I expect folks who do video-conferencing or even conferencing all in one room could find uses for it to accelerate drafting/analysis of proposals/formulating quotations etc.

    Would a one-secretary small business want it? Not likely, but a wide range of organizations could use it. Schools in a school-division could use it for budget-proposals certainly. A budget generated collaboratively might be more effective/accepted. A website accepting requests for quotations could use it to interact with a potential customer, just two people, but one filling in wants and the other suggesting certain products and prices. When both parties accept the result, they can make the deal. Science students could use such software to analyze an experiment. Instead of students repeating measurements to estimate accuracy/check for errors, each student could make an entry in a spreadsheet which would calculate means and standard deviation, produce graphs and such in real time. We used to do that with chalkboards but a lab with multiple PCs could do it much faster.

  14. DrLoser says:

    What I noticed right away is that there are now proper styles for tables in Calc

    “Whoo-Hoo!” indeed. And as early as version 5.3, yet. I’d have thought that not implementing a major, user-friendly, feature like this very early in the roadmap might make you wonder about priorities.

    … and that there is an accompanying application to run on a server for on-line/collaborative editing.

    And it’s precisely this sort of “effort” which explains why stuff that users actually want is pushed down the backlog. Tell me, Pog:
    1. Have you, personally, ever felt the need for on-line/collaborative editing of a spread-sheet? The answer is, of course, no.
    2. Do you think that I, personally, have ever felt the need for on-line/collaborative editing of a spread-sheet? The answer is, of course, no.
    3. Do you have any friends, acquaintances, workmates (past or present) who have ever felt the need for on-line/collaborative editing of a spread-sheet? The answer is, of course, no.
    4. Do you think that I have any friends, acquaintances, workmates (past or present) who have ever felt the need for on-line/collaborative editing of a spread-sheet? The answer is, of course, no.

    It’s the sort of “feature” that amateur hackers love to spin up, because “it’s sooo Kewl!” But actually there is little or no demand for it.

    Worse than that, really. It could arguably be described as a misfeature. Abuse of spreadsheets as a “poor man’s alternative to actual programming” is rife out there. Making it easier for a whole bunch of thoughtless numpties to chuck more mouse turds into the bran tub is not necessarily a good thing.

  15. kurkosdr wrote, “there is always some really ugly terminal-ness hidden underneath which is necessary for doing simple tasks such as updating the office app”.

    Well, if I want the latest version, I can type a command or two and get it done. I could create a little script and have it down to one command. It’s all good. As I recall, it’s three “untar”s and “dpkg”s so I could create a command like “installLO version” and make it happen. I could probably throw in the download and hash-verification too. I don’t bother because it’s of no concern. I’m retired. A bit of typing makes me feel useful.

  16. kurkosdr wrote, “they don’t even need “root” (like Ubuntu Software Center does)”.

    root is one ring of security. If you want or need to throw that away you can. Just elevate your user to the “wheel” or root group or log in as root directly. Some distros have done that from the beginning because security was so much better than TOOS in the old days that they felt safe doing that. I don’t.

  17. kurkosdr says:

    BTW, command installed LibreOffice 5.2.5 and LibreOffice 5.3, but I can just ignore the 5.3 and use the other one (can’t make documents open with 5.3 no matter what).

    So… it kinda sorta works. Good enough for Desktop Linux. Back to work.

  18. ram says:

    I look forward to trying the new LibreOffice, although I don’t do as many documents as I used to. Never used Microsoft crap however, as I’ve always had the need to do proper equations/mathematics. In ancient times that was TeX under Unix, then emTeX under DR-DOS, then emTeX under OS/2, and then the various incarnations of StarOffice/OpenOffice/LibreOffice under Linux which gradually merged in the TeX functions.

  19. kurkosdr says:

    Which brings me to my conclusion: The best OS to run FOSS apps is Windows.

    LibreOffice: Easy update (the online update is actually in options)
    VLC: Has the cool DirectX video wallpaper feature, and ships with libdvdcss and full codecs for sure
    MPC-HC: Best video player out there. Windows exclusive.
    Firefox and Chrome: No GPU acceleration headaches.

  20. kurkosdr says:

    After following the instuctions, LibreOffice launches but I cannot create a LibreOffice Writer document, and also have no LibreOffice Writer icon in lenses. And cannot open any documents

    Now I will try this: libre-software(dot)net/how-to-install-libreoffice-on-ubuntu-linux-mint/

    It may work, it might not.

    No, I don’t care what the problem is. I just want to find the app (in the vendor’s site or in some app store), tap or double-click on the package and be presented with the installer or the installed package. This is how Android, ChromeOS, Windows and MacOS X do it. And they don’t even need “root” (like Ubuntu Software Center does) which a user might not have. This is how Symbian OS did it (which is technically an open-source OS). This is how my cousin’s Sony Ericsson dumbphone did it (for jars).

    Aww Pog, with all that blogging you almost had me convinced Desktop Linux’s problems were only battery life. Unfortunately, all it takes is a normal person (aka a normal person who doesn’t want to “read up” on how to update a frickin’ office suite but instead get business done) to attempt to do anything beyond the trivial on the damn thing to destroy all your blogging efforts in minutes.

    But anyway… enjoy your 1%er OS. Just don’t whine when your free OS has 1-2% of the market, or if Microsoft makes EFI and secure boot a requirement to install Windows on a system and non-secure boot systems become extinct. You let them do that by making a user-hostile OS.

  21. kurkosdr says:

    (i meant instructions in omgubuntu)

  22. kurkosdr says:

    (the instructions in libreoffice also removed the icons from my sidebar, because you have to remove the old before you install the new, but removing it removes the icons. Nice! Expecting this kind of stuff to fly in an era people are used to updating apps with a single click in the app store is just insane. I have to deal with this crap because my employer wants me to use Ubuntu)

  23. kurkosdr says:

    I meant search box for web search, so they can rake in some steady income from a search engine, like mozilla. It won’t be as much as mozilla rakes in because an office suite is different from a browser, but it should provide a source of hard currency.

    ———————————————————–

    BTW, are the instructions for updating as easy and intuitive as these?
    omgubuntu(dot)co(dot)uk/2016/08/install-libreoffice-5-2-on-ubuntu-ppa

    That’s what I find funny about Desktop Linux. Under the sleek UIs, there is always some really ugly terminal-ness hidden underneath which is necessary for doing simple tasks such as updating the office app. Meanwhile, on Windows it is a case of clicking help -> about or help -> check for updates.

    PS: And of course, the documentation is up to open-source standards, which means it is basically garbage: help(dot)libreoffice(dot)org/Common/Online_Update
    I don’t even have such an option in my options! Go open-source!
    imgur(dot)com/a/tpTFx

  24. Kurkosdr wrote, “I wish those guys were smart enough to pull a Mozilla and put a search engine box at the top right and the right click”.

    CTRL-F opens a search box in bottom left on mine. It’s just one click instead of moving focus to a fixed search box with one click I get both opening the box and moving the focus in one click. It’s just like the browser.

  25. Kurkosdr says:

    Per second = per se

  26. Kurkosdr says:

    Not amazed per second, but I am glad the Oracle purchase of OpenOffice didn’t result in the death of the code.

    I wish those guys were smart enough to pull a Mozilla and put a search engine box at the top right and the right click (how many times you are reading something while editing a Word document and wanted to search it) and have access to a steady funding source, so they could compete with commercial software like WPS and MS Office.

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