Bill Gates Does Some Good

“Bill Gates warned against denying climate change and pushed for more innovation in clean energy, during an event Friday at Columbia University in New York.”
 
See Bill Gates warns against denying climate change
I hate Bill Gates. The harm he’s done to the world monopolizing desktop computing is incalculable. OTOH, these days he’s actually putting some of his ill-gotten gains to good use like fighting poverty/disease and now, global warming.

This is about the only thing he and I have in common, the desire to preserve that planet as a great place to live in an inhospitable universe. Not dumping millions of tons of CO2 into the atmostphere is a start. I would go on to doing away with cities as concrete jungles and heating/moving things with fossil fuels. Reserve that wealth for manufacturing plastics or lubrication, not pollution.

I hope he gets into planting trees and weeds for Monarch Butterflies too. We can preserve a little beauty in the world while preserving life here too.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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25 Responses to Bill Gates Does Some Good

  1. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “YouDon’tNeedThat(tm)”

    Desktop Linux, the OS for people who don’t really need computers at all.

  2. Ivan says:

    Think of Detroit. It lost a major part of manufacturing and began to rot.

    No. Detroit burned itself to the ground in 1968 and never rebuilt. It also did not lose manufacturing, that was stolen by the predatory tax system in place within the US. Each municipality offers tax breaks to build new factories and businesses tend to go where it is cheap to operate.

    Think of Chicago. It’s like a war-zone. Why is that?

    Gang violence in two neighborhoods does not make the city a war-zone. The complex socio-economic issues that create said gang violence is well beyond the scope of this blog but have nothing to do with cities. You’re really stretching here, Bob.

  3. Deaf Spy says:

    YouDon’tNeedThat(tm)

    In the meanwhile, I am quite happy to be able to run a couple of old educational Dr. Seuss apps for my kinds just out of the box.

  4. Deaf Spy wrote, “It just runs, doesn’t even need compatibility mode.”

    Well, perhaps it’s the perfect OS for Egyptologists. There are very few of us needing to run Netscape 0.92.

  5. Deaf Spy says:

    Sure, GNU/Linux could do it. All I would need would be RedHat or other distro from that era and it would run fine. To run it on a modern release I would need a virtual machine or such.

    Indeed. You will need a distro from that era , which would kinda run only within a virtual machine, because otherwise it won’t recognize and support most of your hardware.

    With Windows, you don’t need a version from that era. The point, Robert, is that Windows 10 x64 latest stable release from this very era, runs Netscape 0.92 without any glitch. It just runs, doesn’t even need compatibility mode.

  6. dougman says:

    “Canada would be healthier if everyone lived in rural areas.”

    So, your idea would be to “evict” everyone from a city of say 1 million, and effect, turning them into refugees?

  7. dougman wrote, “where shall these displaced people go?”

    Canada would be healthier if everyone lived in rural areas. e.g. Manitoba has ~1.3million people and 212 K square miles of area. That comes to 6-7 people per square mile, like farm families in the old days. Manufacturing would be problematic. I guess robots would have to do it all and the rest could work from home. I don’t expect this extreme would ever happen but we could reasonably limit the sizes of cities to ~100K which would make them less problematic and still have advantages of proximity for business/education/events. Know any large cities that aren’t rotting?

    Think of Detroit. It lost a major part of manufacturing and began to rot. That shows that depending on large cities is not sustainable. Think of Chicago. It’s like a war-zone. Why is that? Why do people not feel part of the greater good? Because it’s too large.

    Winnipeg used to be a nice friendly city when it was ~300K people. I used to walk around as a teenager and never saw any problem. Now, some streets are named “murder street/avenue”. That’s why we live close to Winnipeg but not in it. We have lots of friends and family who do live in Winnipeg and they are fearful, there is never peace and quiet in the air, sirens happen every hour of every day, and the news is almost always bad, like the mayor accepting huge gifts from developers and getting away with it…

  8. dougman says:

    “I would go on to doing away with cities ”

    That being your view Pogsey, where shall these displaced people go?

  9. Sure, GNU/Linux could do it. All I would need would be RedHat or other distro from that era and it would run fine. To run it on a modern release I would need a virtual machine or such.

  10. DrLoser says:

    Love the idea of “doing away with cities,” though.

    Bwahahahahahahahaha!

    Suffice it to say that you are unlikely to convince, say, the PRC of that desired eventuality. And suffice it to say that, without cities, your dreams of cheap Chinese tschotchkes forever are … empty gourds.

    What, you think this stuff is produced in Arts and Crafts fayres?

    Loony.

  11. DrLoser says:

    Before Lose ’95 was produced, GNU/Linux was quite usable according to users.

    Billions of them, I suppose.

    Rather a difficult proposition to prove, given the timescale in question. Back then, I was still downloading Slackware on twelve floppy disks or so and desperately trying to make it do anything useful at all. And, as far as I recall, your main experience of IT that year was dropping your laptop on the tarmac at a remote airport in the Far North … not, I believe, installing desktop Linux and Feeling The Joy.

    This mescaline you are on. What grade is it? Can I get it legally, or does it come hidden in the packaging of a Chinese Tractorette?

  12. DrLoser says:

    ISTR billions of users are happy with their battery-life on mobile */Linux systems.

    In what way do you “seem to recall” this implausible Trump-like “alternative fact,” Robert?

    Have you taken a survey, or simply an overdose of psychotic drugs?

  13. Deaf Spy says:

    NetScape was there.

    Indeed. Netscape was there. But no Office suite, no meaningful apps.

    Btw, Robert, I found and downloaded Netscape version 0.92 from here http://sillydog.org/narchive/full123.php

    It runs without issues whatsoever on Windows 10, x64. Of course, it can hardly open any web site today, due to the lack of CSS, JS and all, but hey, the app works.

    Can you do this of Linux?

    P.S. Sorry for changing the subject, but this is fun. I am sure Linux can’t stand up to this challenge.

  14. Kurkosdr wrote, “the much better battery life I am getting from Windows compared to Desktop Linux”.

    ISTR billions of users are happy with their battery-life on mobile */Linux systems. What do you think is wrong with desktop systems that are usually plugged into a wall socket?

  15. Deaf Spy wrote, “where was Linux in 1995. KDE? No. GNOME? No. Office suite? No. Netscape browser / Mozilla? No.”

    NetScape was there. Slackware, RedHat and Debian were there. Didn’t need KDE/GNOME in those days. M$ was playing catch-up and losing in the technology department, like crashing…

  16. Kurkosdr says:

    “Moore’s Law has done more to reduce drain on batteries than anything an OS can do. ”

    But there is a great deal an OS can do nevertheless, as evidenced by the much better battery life I am getting from Windows compared to Desktop Linux.

    Pog, just tell me that one day you won’t try to disprove gravity itself.

  17. kurkosdr wrote, “Desktop Linux… always managing to find the scarce resource and deplete it. Then it was internet connection bandwidth, now it is battery life.”

    That’s silly. Moore’s Law has done more to reduce drain on batteries than anything an OS can do. I’ve used GNU/Linux on a lot of dial-up connections and never felt as burdened as that other OS running neck-deep in malware. If you really want to reduce drain on batteries, use */Linux on a thin client and run your applications on a central server. An idling lightweight CPU uses way less power than an idling heavyweight CPU. A central server can serve many clients, making the power-consumption useful most of the time.

  18. kurkosdr says:

    support for non-Linux files = support for non-Linux filesystems

  19. kurkosdr says:

    This is one very bizarre definition for “quite usable”.

    Well, it could get you into a bash prompt and provide you with a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX (strokes crumb-infested neckbeard). Also, emacs.

    The funny thing about Desktop Linux back then was that you had to download everything. Drivers, support for non-Linux files, most codecs, you name it. In an era a great portion of computers were offline and the rest were connected with PSTN lines.

    Desktop Linux… always managing to find the scarce resource and deplete it. Then it was internet connection bandwidth, now it is battery life.

  20. Deaf Spy says:

    Before Lose ’95 was produced, GNU/Linux was quite usable according to users.

    Hm, old memories, where was Linux in 1995. KDE? No. GNOME? No. Office suite? No. Netscape browser / Mozilla? No.

    This is one very bizarre definition for “quite usable”.

    Further, your sentence implies that Windows 95 was so good that it destroyed all chances for Linux. You know what? You are right. Windows 95 was so good, it also destroyed OS/2’s chances for desktop. I was a great fanboy of OS/2, but had to admit it – Windows 95 was more stable, better looking, and supported more hardware. The only thing OS/2 was doing better was to run DOS app. But Windows 95 had its MS DOS mode, so that advantage wasn’t worthy.

  21. dougman wrote, “why no discussion on the Mosque shooting?”

    Well, I don’t know what happened so I don’t have much to say. There have been arrests but not much information made public. It’s a tragedy of course, but I have no clue about the motivations/details except that some public officials have called it terrorism. That doesn’t tell us much. I suppose there will be more information later today so I may have something to say. It is “interesting” that with a “coordinated attack” and “two shooters” that only a few were killed. That doesn’t make much sense to me. Coordinated attacks usually are designed to maximize casualties and many potential victims were present. I suspect there’s more to the story.

    See http://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/live-blog/quebec-mosque-shooting

    The latest news is still sparse. The shooters have been identified. One called police and surrendered. That’s pretty unusual for a terrorist. The investigation continues.

    Yes, it is unusual. Apparently one guy is not considered a suspect, but a witness

    UPDATE Moments ago it was revealed that worshippers fought back. Good for them! Perhaps that explains the low count of casualties.

    One of the detained is now called a witness…

  22. Kurkosdr wrote, “I like him because when he was doing that, the alternatives were Apple, Amiga, IBM and Sun. Linux was far away and SCO UNIX was awful.”

    Before Lose ’95 was produced, GNU/Linux was quite usable according to users. I did use Lose ’95 for a few months and hated it. It crashed daily in my classroom. I installed SCO GNU/Linux and had zero problems after that on the same hardware. I’ve used GNU/Linux almost exclusively ever since. The last time I was forced to use TOOS in my classroom was about 2005, I think. I installed GNU/Linux on leftover Lose ’98 machines and had so many seats in class that we didn’t have to use the lab much. Students loved GNU/Linux. It was faster and more reliable than TOOS.

  23. Kurkosdr says:

    ” changeI hate Bill Gates. The harm he’s done to the world monopolizing desktop computing is incalculable. ”

    I like him because when he was doing that, the alternatives were Apple, Amiga, IBM and Sun. Linux was far away and SCO UNIX was awful.

    At least Bill allowed us to run his OS on a dirt-cheap Compaq instead of boutique overpriced hardware.

    Oh, and he gave us Win95.

  24. dougman says:

    BTW Pogsey, why no discussion on the Mosque shooting?

  25. dougman says:

    First you start off by stating that you “hate” Bill Gates, then do an about face and kiss is global warming ass, so obviously you do not hate him that much.

    Also, “dumping millions of tons of CO2” is not bad for the environment. Plant life requires CO2 to live, unless you “conveniently” forgot about such facts. CO2 can hardly be a pollutant because everyone is breathing it out. Humans exhale CO2 at 38,000 ppm, so what if the CO2 levels rise, everyone would enjoy a warmer climate.

    But, Billy isn’t the president, Trump is and Trump will make America great again.

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