Small EV Doesn’t Freak Out TLW!


Cool, eh? A car for one passenger that needs no gasoline or oil…
Hay! I posted on FaceBook about the ElectraMeccanica Solo EV and TLW responded with a “Like”. This is good. Perhaps we’ll get two…

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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12 Responses to Small EV Doesn’t Freak Out TLW!

  1. dougman wrote, “Don’t you mean a “drive belt”?”

    No. It’s not unusual for machinery like this to use a lubricated linked belt. This is a toothed rubber reinforced belt and it is dry. It doesn’t need lubrication because it doesn’t slip at all. It’s also exposed to air and lubrication might pick up dust/debris.

    dougman wrote, “I would want a metal chain.”

    Well. That adds more weight and cost and maintenance, not what we want. I have dry belts that have been running fine for ~26 years on the snowblower, mind you only a few hours a year, and my mower’s belt has outlasted the manufacturer’s original equipment multiple times since I replaced it with a cheap one. I ordered five thinking I’d have to replace them annually… I think the old roto-tiller used up three or four belts in its lifetime of ~22 years of heavy dirty work. So, a nice Kevlar™ toothed belt should last me a few years at least. I’m not worried about it. It’s easy to inspect and it will mostly be used on blacktop except for my driveway and the shooting range.

  2. dougman says:

    “dry belt”

    Dry belt? Don’t you mean a “drive belt”? Those things are notoriously for failing. If I was paying 19K CAD, I would want a metal chain. In fact, giving the design specs, I would change a entire litany of items.

    – Snowmobile option for winter, instead of wheels
    – Replace the transmission with a CVT or hydrostatic
    – Electric motor replaced with a large air-cooled two-stroke

  3. dougman wrote, “I guess this thing has no transmission”.

    It’s a dry belt drive to the rear wheel. Easy. Just lubricate the bearings. They can be sealed units like most wheels that go tens of thousands of miles before bearing changes. The belt will eventually wear out but it’s a quick change to fix that. Stuff is accessible. An electric motor can be efficient over a wide range of RPM unlike ICE which suffers from low torque at both ends.

  4. dougman wrote, “if China can build that many in one year, why would they bother paying ElectraMeccanica Vehicles Corp. any royalties, etc..”

    Contracts. There isn’t any difference between buying the parts there and assembling them here than assembling them there and shipping here as far as business goes. The largest market is probably Asia/Africa in the near future. Many North Americans still seem to love waste. They require education. Folks going from bipedal motion to trikes see immediate benefit and lower ongoing costs.

  5. dougman says:

    “Nope. They’ve lined up a factory that can crank out 100K units per annum. ”

    LOL, if China can build that many in one year, why would they bother paying ElectraMeccanica Vehicles Corp. any royalties, etc..

    China could just start cranking them out and giving the company the finger. They would offer them on Alibaba for 1/3 the cost out competing ElectraMeccanica Vehicles Corp., causing them to go out of business.

  6. dougman says:

    A bit of grease in the bearings and hinges will last for years. Compare that with my gas-guzzler that wants many litres annually.”

    LOL, I guess this thing has no transmission. FAIL.

  7. dougman wrote, ““branches in China and India by next year.”
     
    Fantasy.”

    Nope. They’ve lined up a factory that can crank out 100K units per annum. Once they’ve demonstrated the product works for end-users en masse, this thing’s going global. Their present production line is used for prototyping and can make ~1 or 2 per day. They will ramp up to a bigger facility soon that will be an order of magnitude larger, and in a year or so they will go for mass-production. The Chinese can do that. This is designed in Canada. Parts are sourced wherever they are cheap and plentiful. There is very little custom-designed except the frame and body. Everything else is an industry-standard part off the shelf. I guess the software is configured for Canada at the moment but that’s probably just a setting somewhere. I expect that when it is mass-produced price could be quite a bit lower but I want one ASAP.

    This year, I should finish my major planting. So, I want to drive more next year and this machine will allow that.

    “BTW, this toy STILL requires oil.”

    A bit of grease in the bearings and hinges will last for years. Compare that with my gas-guzzler that wants many litres annually.

  8. dougman says:

    “They’ll likely have an IPO”

    LOL….sure. I guarantee, anyone stupid enough to drop money into such a their business deserves to lose it.

    “branches in China and India by next year.”

    Fantasy.

    “Many of the parts come from China”

    I thought everything was made in Canada.

    Actually China would steal the design and use it for themselves, giving Kroll the finger.

    BTW, this toy STILL requires oil.

  9. dougman wrote, “This is not a long-term venture, to say the least. Due to the need of a $5000 Canadian subsidy and knowing that the estimated electric cars sold annually, per the six main Canadian provinces being 1800 units.”

    Of course this is a longterm proposition. They’ll likely have an IPO and branches in China and India by next year. Many of the parts come from China and they’ll be able to get the cost of production down quite a bit there. They already have a year’s production in the pipe. It’s hard for a business to fold with an orderbook like that unless the wheels fall off. These guys know how to attach wheels at 200mph. This car is easy for them.

  10. ram wrote, “A problem with 3 wheel vehicles is that in many countries they are considered motorcycles.”

    I haven’t heard of that here. Government insurance even gives them a break for less use/risk in winter. I think the trikes could be used in winter except that batteries don’t work as well and heating the interior adds to the load. This would be a second vehicle for me so I could always use the other vehicle in winter. It’s cozy…

  11. ram says:

    A problem with 3 wheel vehicles is that in many countries they are considered motorcycles. Often, motorcycle licenses are difficult to obtain. Those states think they are suppressing “biker gangs” riding big Harleys, but what they are really preventing is fuel efficient urban transport.

  12. dougman says:

    Place your bets!

    Bankruptcy in < 3-years.

    This is not a long-term venture, to say the least. Due to the need of a $5000 Canadian subsidy and knowing that the estimated electric cars sold annually, per the six main Canadian provinces being 1800 units. Three wheel cars have been tried for the past few decades and they all end up in failure, the Elio being the latest.

    https://jalopnik.com/elio-motors-future-looks-doubtful-with-100-000-in-the-1790947889

    The current price for a Kia Soul is about the same cost of this Pogsey dream boat, but you get way more room in the Kia. Given the choice, the consumer will certainly pick the Kia over a electric Big-wheel. Pogsey on the other hand, he rather piss his pension away.

    Don't be a Pogsey.

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