LibreOffice Goes Online

“With the Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) you can easily get your own online Office Suite up and running at home!
 
The development edition is aimed at home users and contains the latest and greatest developments. We want as many people as possible to try it out and get back control of their own online documents. We’d also love to get people involved in our efforts to make LibreOffice Online even better. Download the Docker Image, enjoy using it at home”
 
See Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) – Collabora Productivity
Well, Meeks and company have done it. What was at first a rather limited demonstration of LibreOffice running in a browser window is now available as a Docker image for everyone to try out. I haven’t yet, because I’m under the weather with yet another winter cold, but that shouldn’t delay you. If you have multiple clients and like the idea of collaborative editing over a network and you want control of the software, this is for you.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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27 Responses to LibreOffice Goes Online

  1. dougman says:

    “Every school in which I taught after 1997 had Internet access, more or less.”

    Did you sell them on the notion of ice too? I hope the computers you set up were IP67 rated and stickered by the CSA.

    Speaking of rear ends Robert, Reindeer dung makes a great fire to warm them Igloos.

  2. dougman says:

    “Whatever gave you the idea that a server off the Internet was useless?”

    Playing backup for Fifi now?

    Essentially is NOT the same as absolutely, or positively. Fifi’s juxtaposition was, “Private server in business or school that people on site are connecting to the NSA cannot collect.” My retort was simply, what are people going to do during the day? I mean, not having Internet access is really boring Robert. Imagine being on a island with your with solar generator alternator thing-a-ma-job, with no internet connection. Life would be really boring wouldn’t it?

    A business couldn’t even function today with Internet access, of course there are a few examples, but those harken back to when people did not have electricity either.

  3. dougman wrote, “Eskimos did not have Internet back then Robert.”

    False. Every school in which I taught after 1997 had Internet access, more or less. Certainly every Inuit school did. ISTR office, lab, library, and every classroom had cable. A few communities did not have Internet into homes but that was being addressed everywhere. The last place I worked in the North had a tower and was selling wireless modems/routers that folks could buy and share amongst a few homes. Others did it over the phone lines. Clearly, dougman is pulling facts out his rear end.

  4. dougman wrote, “His notion of security from the NSA, is to not connect a server/phone/computer to the outside world, essentially making it useless.”

    Whatever gave you the idea that a server off the Internet was useless? Of course such servers have value: storage, computing power, memory all made available to local clients. One could question the relative worth of servers but the worth does not go to zero or negative just because there is no access from the Internet. I’d bet Yahoo wishes its servers were not all accessible from the Internet about now…

  5. dougman says:

    “If you want to provide a service to outsiders of your company, buy a “cloud service” ”

    But that trumps Fifi’s position. His notion of security from the NSA, is to not connect a server/phone/computer to the outside world, essentially making it useless.

  6. dougman says:

    “I did this in schools almost everywhere I went in the North.”

    Sorry, Eskimos did not have Internet back then Robert.

  7. kurkosdr says:

    “Why would anyone deploy a private server into business or school, and not allow outside access idiot?”

    Why would anyone deploy a private server into business or school, and allow outside access?

    If you want to provide a service to outsiders of your company, buy a “cloud service” (aka server share as it was called before the marketdroids took over) and you will have a reliable service, and you may even get automated patches for the whole thing up to the CMS, depending on how many bits of the software stack were part of the package.

    There is the question of employees accessing from their homes, with a password over a secure connection, so if this is what you meant by outside access, ok that’s good.

  8. dougman wrote, “Why would anyone deploy a private server into business or school, and not allow outside access idiot?”

    Uh, authentication, file-sharing, web-caching, printing, databasery, X … Local access may be at gigabit/s speeds while Internet access could be at mbits/s speeds and less secure. I did this in schools almost everywhere I went in the North. It was a force-multiplier for the hardware we had.

    So, who’s the idiot?

  9. dougman says:

    “NSA does send orders to google for information by FBI because cracking encryption costs a lot of resources.”

    NSA does not send order to Google, fool! The data is already existing on their hardware at Camp Williams Utah.

    Why would the NSA contact the FBI, to order Google to provide it data, so as to crack encrypted data? That line of thinking makes no sense.

    The NSA is far larger then the CIA and FBI combined. Its more like, “Hey Eric!!…YO!!…Spool up data on Citizen 7735820-30…You got it!” Few minutes later, they are reviewing everything about you and all your social connections.

  10. dougman says:

    “Private server in business or school that people on site are connecting to the NSA cannot collect.”

    LOL! Why would anyone deploy a private server into business or school, and not allow outside access idiot? What are people going to do during the day? Use MS Paint and Solitaire? How would either institution even function?

    Fifi’s, notion of security. “I have a great idea. Let’s deploy phones!..but ahem..lets not connect them to the cellular network or even phone company landlines. Rest assured they will be secure and no one will us!”

  11. Deaf Spy says:

    Fifi, Fifi…

    Word in Browser in Office 365 is capable of pasting formatted text. I just tried it, to be sure.

    This is possible, because browsers are capable of pasting formatted text from the clipboard since times immemorable. There is, Fifi, you know, this text-area control, which can be turned into a HTML WYSIWYG editor using JS. That control can paste plain-text and formatted text. It always could.

    In other words, Fifi, you are clueless, you have no experience with anything. Shut up.

  12. oiaohm says:

    What people need, Robert, is to copy something from one document and paste it into another, and retain formatting. Imagine you copy a table, but only the plain text comes through… Of course, I guess you and TLW never copy tables, so people don’t need that.
    Deaf Spy you need to read carefully. Microsoft Office online suffers from the same fault. Because web browsers don’t allow you to access clipboard buffer in RTF format at this stage. Libreoffice online support RTF cut and past between Libreoffice office online documents in the same instance.

    This cut copy and paste RTF issue is a deal break for google docs, Microsoft office 365 online and every other on-line office suite. The only online office suite at this stage attempting to address it by working with web browsers to add new API to support RTF cut and paste from local system to browser and back again is Libreoffice Online by Collabora. So much for those who said we went to on-line office suites ages ago basic things like RTF cut copy paste in them still don’t work properly.

    Until the open-source proponents realize that “small” glitches like these are a real deal-breaker for common users, LO and the likes will always be behind, and enjoy distribution only in politically controlled establishments.
    The reality here is closed source ignores many of these so called small glitches. There are many small glitches that open source admits to and repairs that remain not repaired in closed source decades after they were fixed.

    Deaf Spy find example of a RTF copy from local application and paste into an online browser application. The answer is you cannot. That feature does not exist yet. Does Microsoft or Google docs openly admit they cannot do that feature the answer is no they don’t. The reality you are getting up libreoffice because they are truthful about the weakness.

  13. Deaf Spy says:

    Textual copy/paste works. These guys are writing about RTF stuff in a browser. So, it works for the stuff real people need done.

    What people need, Robert, is to copy something from one document and paste it into another, and retain formatting. Imagine you copy a table, but only the plain text comes through… Of course, I guess you and TLW never copy tables, so people don’t need that.

    Until the open-source proponents realize that “small” glitches like these are a real deal-breaker for common users, LO and the likes will always be behind, and enjoy distribution only in politically controlled establishments.

  14. oiaohm says:

    You’re an idiot. All data transmitted is already archived, this was implemented back in the 70s. The NSA doesn’t need Google, they can pull their own records.
    Private server in business or school that people on site are connecting to the NSA cannot collect.

    All data transmitted over the internet could be captured. Schools running a private CODE 2.0 server exactly what data is going over the internet. The answer can be nothing. Boarding schools where all students are connected directly to school network so the CODE 2.0 could be only LAN.

    So dougman you are an idiot the main reason why the UK government was interested in CODE 1.0 was browser based office suite that could operate with no internet connection so no NSA snooping in particular departments.

    Private cloud has some major security advantages particularly when these are private clouds that exist outside the internet. Including means to release one lot of information on the internet for the NSA and others to see and to tell your staff from the internal network that the information was bogus.

    The NSA doesn’t need Google, they can pull their own records.
    NSA does send orders to google for information by FBI because cracking encryption costs a lot of resources.
    https://www.google.com/transparencyreport/userdatarequests/US/

    Sorry dougman if I quote enough it document fact that NSA does send request to Google. So its more you being a idiot thinking PRISM is more effective than it is.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/11/microsoft-nsa-collaboration-user-data

    Its not just Google that at times hands NSA the unencrypted data. So you use encrypted link between your browser and office 365 on-line you might have avoid PRISM from instantly reading the data but the direct request from the NSA to Microsoft to read your data unencrypted will be approved.

    Encryption provides a delay between when the data is captured to when it is decoded. A lot of information is only useful for limited time frames. Having the information after that time frame is up alters nothing.

    Basically dougman you are a total idiot on this topic. PRISM in it day was great before everyone started encrypting as much as we do now. Encryption comes a scaling nightmare the more stuff people are transmitting around encrypted the bigger and bigger systems NSA need to be able to decode and about 4 years ago the volume got so huge that NSA could not build bigger servers to-do it and NSA has since then required going around giving orders to different groups to hand over the unencrypted.

    So if enough groups run enough servers where the NSA cannot give orders to the NSA simply will not have enough processing power to decode it all so have to be selective and miss things. There is no such thing as decoding encrypted that is instant so encrypted content costs resources. NSA resources are not infinity.

    The reality is NSA has a mountain of data growing on them they don’t know if it contains anything important or not because they have not decoded it. So the old monitoring plan has kinda failed.

  15. dougman wrote, “You’re an idiot.”, without saying why. NSA does not have the data that I write into LibreOffice today, idiot… This web-version of LibreOffice avoids public clouds and keeps the data at a greater distance from NSA and other miscreants.

  16. dougman says:

    FIfi, does any of your ramblings ever have a point? It’s almost like you cut-up a magazine and dump in various paragraphs to arrange a post. Maybe in a million years time, you too could create a Shakespearean play.

  17. dougman says:

    “Some people don’t want some foreign corporations controlling their information. e.g. NSA telling Google to spill the beans on customer X… or Google dispatching salesmen to outfit discussing Y.”

    You’re an idiot. All data transmitted is already archived, this was implemented back in the 70s. The NSA doesn’t need Google, they can pull their own records.

  18. oiaohm says:

    Deaf Spy most of the known issues with Libreoffice online apply to 365 online office suite as well. Like RTF cut and paste does not work to and from browser at all so this does not matter if you are using 365 online or CODE 2.0 the same feature is dead. Difference is developers behind libreoffice online are talking to chrome and firefox and other browser developers to attempt to find a valid solve to the limitation.

    Btw, the World has moved on from online office suits some years ago. Only a total ignoramus would consider Office 365 as just an office suit online. As usual, open source is way behind what commercial software does.
    There is no advantage to being first long term particularly if there is some major issues. Also CODE 2.0 is not just a office suite either its designed to integrate into owncloud, NextCloud and pydio with more to come. If you wish to you can integrate libreoffice online into your own project.

    There is a big difference between most of the on-line office suites and Libreoffice. The core of Libreoffice Android viewer, desktop Libreoffice and Libreoffice Online is absolutely identical. So the importers/exporters are absolute identical between all 3 if they happen to be the same version of Libreoffice.

    Something to be aware of it that Libreoffice online CODE is not the first open source online Office suite. Does not matter if it google docs, 365 or one of the other open source on-line office suites they have the same universal problem lack of importers and exporters for all document formats.

    With 365 look up “Office 365
    Enterprise E1” the base plan there is not really that much in it when you compare it to Libreoffice with owncloud.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feng_Office_Community_Edition
    On-line Office suites was in fact done first by Open Source. The issues of importers and exporters with lack of local application option blocked the path.

    In fact, you could do create a document and/or spreadsheet almost back in mid-2009 and collaborate on it over the phone in real-time.
    If you dig back far enough the first on-line office suite is 2005 “Online OS”. Same set of issues that see these web desktops die out against docs and 365 is what gives Libreoffice foot hold against the others.

    There is a reasons for using CODE 2.0 over google docs. Big one is you can host CODE 2.0 on premises so areas with suspect internet connections and decent lan it can function quite well. Then you have all the privacy aspects.

    Even with chromebooks in a school to use google docs you still need enough internet connection for all the students to-do that. CODE 2.0 does support using google drive.

    Chromebooks being able to run android applications might cause CODE 2.0 trouble but the render engine of CODE 2.0 is the same as the Android version of Libreoffice.

    This is the big thing CODE 2.0 is about providing web browser base office suite using the same engine and everything else Libreoffice to allow deploying truly uniform document support. You really don’t want you browser, laptop and desktop displaying documents different due to using different versions of Office suites. This is exactly what happens when you use google docs or 365 online with local office suites that the online and local are displaying documents differently at times.

    Yes the commercials might be first in some cases methods they have chosen are buggy in the on-line/local office program field.

  19. dougman wrote, “Honestly do not understand the actual reasoning for the purpose in doing this.”

    Some people don’t want some foreign corporations controlling their information. e.g. NSA telling Google to spill the beans on customer X… or Google dispatching salesmen to outfit discussing Y.

  20. dougman says:

    Honestly do not understand the actual reasoning for the purpose in doing this. I mean, you can use Google docs already online. In fact, you could do create a document and/or spreadsheet almost back in mid-2009 and collaborate on it over the phone in real-time.

    I do not see this becoming a long-term thing, due to the proliferation of Chromebooks through the business and educational markets.

  21. Deaf Spy wrote, “doesn’t work to achieve very basic stuff”.

    Textual copy/paste works. These guys are writing about RTF stuff in a browser. So, it works for the stuff real people need done.

  22. Deaf Spy says:

    Read that:
    There are a number of known issues that are hard for us to fix in CODE. These include copy & paste – while we can provide rich eg. RTF content for selections from the server to the browser, existing browser APIS are extraordinarily unpleasant (to the point of un-usability) for copy/pasting rich content – as such, we do plain text copy/paste.

    And stopped reading. So typical. Robert again recommends a solution he never tried, and that even doesn’t work to achieve very basic stuff.

    Btw, the World has moved on from online office suits some years ago. Only a total ignoramus would consider Office 365 as just an office suit online. As usual, open source is way behind what commercial software does.

  23. oiaohm says:

    http://www.slideshare.net/fweng322/migrating-odf-and-libreoffice-in-taiwan
    dougman find the video to that one. You will find why Microsoft is attempting false news.

    Taiwan migration to ODF and Libreoffice was started by false news. This is not the only Migration ODF support company have triggered by false news. Its funny False news is working successfully with 1 or 2 attempts with ODF and Libreoffice yet completely failing for Microsoft after 8+ attempts.

  24. oiaohm says:

    dougman zdnet followed up on the Munich bull crap.
    http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-partner-claims-munich-should-switch-from-linux-to-windows-10/

    So when a reporter in fact goes an does their homework they find out that is just Microsoft Partner with no government support at all.

    This is the 8 time some Microsoft Partner has pulled this stunt. Munich was at the most recent Libreoffice conference and they were asked about it again and debunked the idea that they were leaving Linux any time soon again.

    https://www.collaboraoffice.com/government-open-source-office-deal-set-to-provide-major-savings.php

    Your links mention nothing about a imagined UK deployment. What is the user-base for said deployment?
    Everyone using the UK governement cloud as this was what Libreoffice online was designed for as part of the UK and Collabora deal. Collabora won the deal to provide the UK government with a on-line Office suit. CODE 1.0 is part of that deal and was successfully deployed.

  25. dougman says:

    Your links mention nothing about a imagined UK deployment. What is the user-base for said deployment?

    Well, ahem, we’ll will always have Munich.

    https://mspoweruser.com/munich-city-planning-to-move-back-to-microsoft-windows-and-office-from-open-source-software/

  26. oiaohm says:

    CODE 2.0
    dougman would pay to read link before commenting. The 1.0 version was deployed by the UK government so has already had a lot QA performed.
    https://www.collaboraoffice.com/collabora-online/
    Right here is can buy the commercially support version.

    The issue here is that product is not poor quality and is truly commercially developed.

    http://www.slideshare.net/fweng322/migrating-odf-and-libreoffice-in-taiwan

    There are many migrations to Libreoffice under way.

  27. dougman says:

    *cringe* more unstable software.

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