Shame On My Country, Canada…

“it’s become increasingly common over the past decade or so to see laws being passed to either mandate the use of open-source software or, at the very least, encourage people in government who make procurement decisions to do so.”
 
See Which countries have open-source laws on the books?
I’m proud of Canada. It’a vital place and home of several generations of my family. One can still afford health care here, get a good education for a reasonable price, grow your own food or hunt/gather it, get plenty of clean water and fresh air, live in mountains, planes, deserts and forests, whatever you choose. However, when it comes to government spending money foolishly on non-Free software that the world can and does provide at cost as Free/Libre Open Source Software, Canada is as backwards as governments in Africa and the Middle East.

Canadians are just as smart as anyone. Canadians can figure things out. Canadians are resourceful. Then, why is our government a slave to M$ and “friends”? Those guys are not our friends. They want to charge several times what software costs if we develop it ourselves or in cooperation with millions of developers around the world. What’s holding us back? I don’t get it.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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16 Responses to Shame On My Country, Canada…

  1. dougman says:

    “I know American tax returns addition mostly some subtraction.”

    Racist, Fruit/vegetable picker from Australia that knows tax accounting. YOu’re becoming a regular Tony Stark aren’t you?

  2. oiaohm says:

    NO, but I have done numerous AMERICAN tax returns sans any sort of computational device.
    dougman even bas returns in Australia there is a divide requirement.

    I know American tax returns addition mostly some subtraction. Australian tax returns addition, subtraction, division and multiplication and some rules of bracket orders required. Some of the rules on deprecation and percentage of use are absolutely evil in the Australian tax system resulting having to tally up hours of usage for different types of usages in log books and divide to get percentage and other things like that. Australian on-line tax return automatically does most of these maths for you but it does not do log book tally and percent calcs. So there is a calculator of some form required when doing a tax return for businesses in Australia. Yes Australian tax return you can be fined for getting your maths wrong.

    So dougman is a normal USA moron who thinks the reset of the world is exactly like the USA when it not on a lot of things this includes tax returns.

  3. dougman says:

    “Have you ever tried to-do an Australian tax return without a calculator.”

    NO, but I have done numerous AMERICAN tax returns sans any sort of computational device.

    “Never been to Australia.”

    Yep. Nothing to see there.

  4. dougman says:

    “Have you ever tried to-do an Australian tax return without a calculator.”

    NO, but I have done numerous AMERICAN tax returns sans any sort of computational device.

    “Never been to Australia.”

    Yep. Nothing there to see there.

  5. oiaohm says:

    dougman
    Ahhh…can’t count, so you need a machine to tally up vegetable/fruit sales from your field picking.
    Have you ever tried to-do an Australian tax return without a calculator.

    Never been to Australia. Vegetable/Fruit sales are measured in weight. So you don’t normally value while picking. Instead you get the weigh bridge values and multiply weight by price per kg for the grade the product was graded. So you truly do need something that can multiply and this is not a job of a field worker. They only have to fill bins and boxes. You also pay them based on weight when they are working for contract. So it very important that a manager can do multiplications fairly quickly people on contract don’t like waiting around to get paid.

    Sorry only a idiot would suggest what you did. Its a property owner or manager who uses calculators.

    Due to calculators being important they were not taken into the field but only in a office.

    dougman so claiming I cannot count is you just being a moron or maybe the USA people are nuts with equipment. So should I think USA people are insane from your comment or is it only you.

  6. dougman says:

    “The first Calculator I ever used..”

    Ahhh…can’t count, so you need a machine to tally up vegetable/fruit sales from your field picking.

  7. oiaohm says:

    dougman
    I bet you couldn’t even operate a “Mechanical Calculator”.
    LOLOLOL
    If you cannot operate a modernish Mechanical Calculator you cannot use a normal Calculator.

    http://www.vintagecalculators.com/html/olivetti_mechanical.html
    The first Calculator I ever used is on this page “Olivetti Summa Prima” Only thing you will notice missing from the keyboard is equals and that is pull the handle. Yes that one is full mechanical. Main reason why we were using it was rolling power blackouts due to a dispute between government and power company workers here.

    dougman I have used some of the older mechanical some of those are serous-ally follow manual or else.

    So a locksmith is a hacker of sorts?
    The term cracker comes from locksmiths. Making a lock is smithing is lock picking a lock is cracking it. So a lock picking person historically was called a cracker. Up to quite modern times in you use to hear the term safe cracker used a lot for those who specialised in picking or breaking into safes. In fact locksmithing is one of the skill sets a hacker could have. Validating physical security requires quite a few different skills.

    Hackers skill sets go well past just computer skills.

  8. dougman says:

    “a combination lock is a crude form of mechanical computer”

    So a locksmith is a hacker of sorts?

  9. duogman wrote, “I bet you couldn’t even operate a “Mechanical Calculator”.”

    Any educated person with a few years behind him likely can. I’ve used an electromechanical calculator that could add, subtract and multiply by repeated addition, a slide rule, and my father had a western equivalent of an abacus, a handheld device with digits on rails that one moved with a stylus. I’ve also seen an early computer that one programmed with patch-cords and punched cards. I can’t remember how much was electronic, mechanical or electrical. It had mechanical and electrical for sure but may have antedated the transistor and was slower than the first pocket-calculators.

    Oh, a combination lock is a crude form of mechanical computer with just a “compare” function. They are still frequently encountered being more convenient than lost keys. A very high percentage of people in developed countries can use those but I know a very few cannot.

  10. dougman says:

    I bet you couldn’t even operate a “Mechanical Calculator”.

  11. oiaohm says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanical_calculator
    About the closest thing to IT in the 18th century was the Abacus.
    Try again dougman. The closest thing to IT in the 18th century was the Mechanical Calculators and weaving machines both end up having parts taken to make early computers. 17th century is when you see the Abacus starting to be done in by Mechanical Calculators due to Mechanical Calculators being faster to operate and require less training even considering the fact the early machines had a lot of issues. 18th century you see prototype production runs Mechanical Calculators so they were around but very expensive. 19th century you see the first mass productions.

    There were quite complex weaving machines in the 18th century. There was quite a debates about weaving machines by the USA founding fathers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacquard_loom
    Yes start of the 19 century you see the Jacquard Loom. This is still while many of the USA founding fathers are involved in politician things.

    The last founding father of the USA died 1836 just 6 years shy of the first computer program by Ada Lovelace. There was a debate about the Jacquard Loom including the remaining alive USA founding fathers in 1802. So USA founding fathers effect spreads into the start of the 19th century. Remember its the Jacquard Loom that gives idea that leads to the punch card computers.

    This is where the USA school system lets it students down. They have no clue how much the USA founding fathers were involved with. I guess talking about the 1802 debate about the right of a machine maker to have exclusive right to repair and reject it would not sit that well in the current day USA patent/customer lock out profit making world.

    So there are different documents that do suggest the founding fathers agreed with at least some of the FOSS ideas particularly on the right to modify and repair. Not so much on the right to clone product.

  12. dougman wrote, “what has Canada even produced in the past 50-years worthy of recognition”.

    Canadians have a long history of accomplishment. 50 years cuts out insulin, contributions to the Manhattan project, a lot of peace-keeping and such. If you must have such a limited horizon there was the arm for the space shuttle, Bombardier’s planes and trains, numerous medical and scientific discoveries, diamond and gold mines, tar sands projects, an awful lot of pork, beef, and cereals, my master’s thesis, …

  13. dougman says:

    “Linux and open source is the way how Founding Fathers of USA would have seen IT world working in best way.”

    About the closest thing to IT in the 18th century was the Abacus.

  14. Mats Hagglund says:

    The idea that open source is the way how free science has always been done is poorly understood. Non-free source is the way how closed ecosystems (not only just Stalinist Russia) are working. Linux and open source is the way how Founding Fathers of USA would have seen IT world working in best way.

  15. dougman says:

    “Canada is as backwards as governments in Africa and the Middle East.”

    When is Canada going to institute Sharia law?

    Now that I think about it, what has Canada even produced in the past 50-years worthy of recognition. If anyone says Bieber, you need your head examined.

    Perhaps Poutine, James Doohan and the McKenzie Brothers would be notable of mention.

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