ARMed Entry

Many years ago M$ and Intel invented Wintel a software and hardware platform that made them $billions, often without having to work for it after they eliminated competition. Times have changed. With smartphones and tablets we saw new platforms emerge under the radar but in full sight… Those who had invested heavily in Wintel could not suppress competition this time. The whole world learned that ARMed processors and */Linux actually work for people.

The last barrier to entry for the new platform is that it’s still not seen as a “personal computing” platform as the legacy PC was. That’s changed in a big way in the past year. Raspberry Pi, Odroid, and a host of others are now available to ordinary folks at the retail level and millions of youngsters are getting their hands on a new PC and coding for it. As well, many GNU/Linux distributions have been ported to ARM and sooner or later will be accessible on the new hardware. A case in point is ViewSonic using Raspberry Pi as their platform for a new thin client. It supports all the usual protocols and is good enough for general use as a PC despite 100mbits/s networking. The Odroid-C2 is even better with more RAM, faster CPU and gigabit/s networking.

This year, I’m going to migrate my AMD64 server and clients thick and thin to Lemaker Cello and Odroid-C2. It’s time.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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6 Responses to ARMed Entry

  1. oiaohm wrote, “1.45 billion dollar payment was a joke thinking that without legal costs to bring AMD production back to the same competitive level it was before Intel actions will cost at least 20 billion dollars to pull off”

    Exactly. My few processors won’t make a dent but I certainly won’t excuse Intel for those crimes. I’m frustrated ARM isn’t more aggressive in the desktop/client/server space because their processors are ready and humanity is ready for small cheap computers. Consumers have been for years. ARM, with A-72 adapted for servery is certainly ready. There’s no longer any reason to be stingy with caches and memory bandwidth to save power as smartphones do. The A1100 is one of a few proper ARMed CPUs that can take on Intel in spaces other than mobility, if not on throughput then on throughput per dollar/mm2 or whatever. There is a space for proper competition for Intel. AMD is handicapped by the damage done by Intel and the fact that they have been tied to AMD64-x86. That’s a huge burden when it comes to innovation. In the ARMed space, ARM and AMD can do whatever they want, contribute a little code to Linux and take off.

  2. oiaohm says:

    dougman
    http://www.extremetech.com/computing/184323-intel-stuck-with-1-45-billion-fine-in-europe-for-unfair-and-damaging-practices-against-amd
    Like it or not Intel did do illegal behaviours. Because what Intel did was not like take X item down market and sell against everyone else in the market but went and did deals directly with markets to exclude everything bar their product.

    Problem for AMD and others the damage Intel did is massive. Until AMD income dropped due to the illegal actions Intel and AMD were sitting on about the same FAB(Semiconductor device fabrication) technology level with VIA a generation behind. Yes the 3 x86 major vendors were technology close to each other. Come forwards to-day there is AMD is about 2 generations behind and VIA is about 4. So even that Intel may have stopped doing anti competitive actions directly the harm to AMD and VIA means of production still means they have a up hill battle.

    1.45 billion dollar payment was a joke thinking that without legal costs to bring AMD production back to the same competitive level it was before Intel actions will cost at least 20 billion dollars to pull off. It would have been fairer to have order Intel to hand over it top two production plants to AMD and VIA due to the damage they had done. That is the level of interference required to in fact undo the damage Intel did.

    ARM, MIPS, Power chip designs are looked at as ways around licensing restrictions of x86 to give access to more upto date FAB.

    Also to take note of this.
    http://wccftech.com/intel-x86-isa-license-spreadtrum/
    The only new x86 licenses that Intel has sold has been totally conditional that they use Intel production. Nothing like holding a total iron fist on the market reducing competition. Yes Nvidia gave up on getting a x86 license when they found out they would have to agree to having Intel produce the chips and set the cost.

    x86 has some major issues.

  3. dougman wrote, “I grow some produce, take them down the farmers market and sell them 4-5 times the cost of what it cost me.”

    Yes, but did you shoot competitors so they didn’t sell at 2 times your cost of production? That’s the thing, not making profit but eliminating competition. Intel literally paid OEMs $billions not to buy AMD so that AMD would starve.

  4. dougman says:

    “paid two three times what a CPU cost to produce.”

    How is that a bad thing? I grow some produce, take them down the farmers market and sell them 4-5 times the cost of what it cost me. There is nothing wrong in doing that, only a socialist thinks that is wrong.

  5. dougman wrote, “who did they steal from”?

    Well, all those folks who had fewer jobs/lower pay because no one was installing AMD, and the folks who paid two three times what a CPU cost to produce. It wasn’t a problem for me because I’ve bought only AMD since ~1995, but consumers and business paid way too much for about a decade.

  6. dougman says:

    “often without having to work for it after they eliminated competition.”

    So you are conveying thievery, who did they steal from?

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