OMG! Mark Shuttleworth Mentions GNU and Linux and Ubuntu In A Single Sentence!

“I think without Ubuntu, it would be very difficult to use traditional Linux every day—not just Ubuntu as I enjoy it, but it’s full family of derivatives and the impact it has every day on Debian and competing distributions, essentially keep GNU/Linux relevant for the desktop and power developer.”
 
See Mark Shuttleworth: ‘Ubuntu keeps GNU/Linux relevant’
Remember how hard it was to even find “Linux” on Ubuntu.com, let alone “GNU”? Well, here we are in an interview and he uses all three terms in a single sentence! I like that even if his thesis wrong. GNU/Linux is plenty relevant. I only use Ubuntu GNU/Linux rarely, usually on others’ PCs. I think TLW has one instance on a notebook provided by a relative. That notebook wasn’t being used by its original owner. How’s that for relevance? She uses Debian GNU/Linux on her desktop. It’s been about a decade since I last used Ubuntu GNU/Linux seriously and that was a mistake. Debian is the way to go. Debian is about using your PC to its maximum capability, not stroking Mark’s ego…

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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13 Responses to OMG! Mark Shuttleworth Mentions GNU and Linux and Ubuntu In A Single Sentence!

  1. oiaohm says:

    Dr Loser who are you buying your machines from Redhat focus says Dell.

    HP works directly on Debian. So if you have a HP computer support contract you automatically get Debian support at no extra charge.
    https://www.debian.org/partners/

    Most corporations, naturally, pay for Red Hat to do it for them. For some inexplicable reason, Robert, you tend to leave this out of your cost/benefit calculations.
    This is wrong Dr Loser. There are statistics collected on what Linux Distributions are in usage.
    http://www.serverwatch.com/columns/slideshows/top-10-linux-server-distributions-of-2015.html
    2015 Ubuntu held number 1 and redhat was in fact number 2. Debian still in the top 10. What is shocking is slackware in 2015 managed to get back into the top 10. I really don’t know where would be deploying slackware so it got percentages.

    Basically Dr Loser you are off wild guessing again I bet. Now please present proper staticitics of usage that show that Redhat is as highly used as you claim or stop claiming it. The reality the statictics have never backed you point of view. The best redhat had has ever got in business usage is number 2 out of all the Linux items out there. For Debian to fall from number 1 took Ubuntu competing with it. Something deb based has held number 1 in business for a very long time.

    https://w3techs.com/blog/entry/debian_is_now_the_most_popular_linux_distribution_on_web_servers
    Even back in 2012 Redhat had fall behind Ubuntu on deployment numbers by businesses. Centos also still outnumbers Redhat in deployed volume.

    Something that is in face about all these numbers is paying by installation is not as highly popular as a 1 billion dollar+ company like redhat suggests. Redhat is less than 10 percent of the Linux support market these days. Its a over 20 billion dollar market and Redhat is only just over 1 billion dollars of that market.

  2. Dr Loser says:

    To repeat:

    You’re just lacking in basic GNU/Linux competency, aren’t you, Robert?

    Go on, deny it.

    When’s the last time you used autoconf?

  3. Dr Loser says:

    Of course I can do all those things, but they are not necessary with a distro like Debian GNU/Linux if the thing is in the repository along with all its dependencies.

    And if they are not, Robert, you have to roll your own. Using the trusty configure/make/make install. Or alternatively, somebody else does it for you, at a cost.

    So, you are left with sitting in an unnecessarily limited pool of regurgitated applications, feeding off Debian like a baby bird, or you otherwise have two choices.

    1) Roll your own. (I have done this. I suspect you are still at the “baby bird” stage.)
    2) Pay for Red Hat (or equivalent) to do it for you.

    Most corporations, naturally, pay for Red Hat to do it for them. For some inexplicable reason, Robert, you tend to leave this out of your cost/benefit calculations.

    Well, you clearly do not pay Red Hat. And I find the proposition that you can roll your own to be dubious at the very best.

    Which leads me to the conclusion, Robert, that you are a slave to Debian.

    A very grateful and obsequious slave, too. You mention your Master’s name every chance you can get.

    Live with it, old man. You have inadvertently become a FLOSS Sheeple.

    And you have no way out. You will be a slave for the rest of your life.

  4. Dr Loser wrote, “you might not be competent enough to deal with packages that require tar and one of those lovely *nix “configure/make/make install” procedures that we all know and love so well.”

    Of course I can do all those things, but they are not necessary with a distro like Debian GNU/Linux if the thing is in the repository along with all its dependencies. I could get by very well using stock Debian but I do enjoy installing a few packages separately where I value being a year or two ahead of the version in the repository as in LibreOffice, FireFox, VLC, and Coppermine Photo Gallery, a few tens of packages versus the thousands of stock packages installed from Debian. I will sometimes build a more recent package just to try out its features. I could do the same by installing “experimental” packages from Debian, or using “back-ports” but I really don’t mind doing the compilation from source or even downloading a binary from a trusted source like kernel.org or LibreOffice.org.

  5. Dr Loser says:

    The incredibly sad thing here, Robert, is that I can do that silly little GNU/Linux dance, and apparently you cannot.

    Pathetic.

  6. Dr Loser says:

    I found the packaging system rather coarse. i.e. There are a rather small number of packages available in the installation that give basic functionality, such as X. This is good. That’s the way I install Debian GNU/Linux. Problems come when you want to install something else. You basically have to untar a bunch of packages.

    Freedom 0: The freedom to run the program for any purpose.
    Freedom 1: The freedom to study how the program works, and change it to make it do what you wish.
    Freedom 2: The freedom to redistribute and make copies so you can help your neighbor.
    Freedom 3: The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements (and modified versions in general) to the public, so that the whole community benefits.

    And you, Robert, have forgotten the Four Freedoms?

    Shame on you.

    Alternatively, of course, you might not be competent enough to deal with packages that require tar and one of those lovely *nix “configure/make/make install” procedures that we all know and love so well.

    You’re just lacking in basic GNU/Linux competency, aren’t you, Robert?

  7. kurkosdr wrote, “Unfortunately, there is no easy way to get rid of the Ubuntu thing on the netbook without nuking the windows partition it’s dual-booted with.”

    That’s rather a stick in the mud thought. Why not create a virtual machine/chroot/dock somewhere and just copy files over? You might have to tweak the bootloader but that’s trivial. It would be a lot easier to just blow away That Other OS. That’s what I did usually. It just wasn’t useful to keep it around.

  8. Dr Loser wrote, “What’s wrong with Slackware?”

    I found the packaging system rather coarse. i.e. There are a rather small number of packages available in the installation that give basic functionality, such as X. This is good. That’s the way I install Debian GNU/Linux. Problems come when you want to install something else. You basically have to untar a bunch of packages. There isn’t a package manager ISTR, just tar or equivalent. It was TGZ in my day, and now it’s TXZ. That works of course but it’s pretty crude. I remember having to hunt all over the web just to install something, not nice. Debian has tens of thousands of packages and if you can figure out which one you want, APT will pull in all the dependencies. That’s nice. You get all the advantages of shared binaries and no dependency-Hell.

  9. kurkosdr says:

    …And Slackware is American slang for “100% effective abstinence-based contraception”, but the forgot to mention that 11th reason.

    As a nerd, I can say that Slackware people are the worst kind of nerd you can come across. I ‘ve been forced to sit by (and unfortunately smell) one of their kind, so I have the right to say that.

  10. Dr Loser says:

    You might enjoy this (humorous) quote from Ten Reasons to choose Slackware Linux, btw:

    Ubuntu is an old african word meaning “I can’t configure Slackware”

  11. Dr Loser says:

    I’ve always wanted to ask this, Robert.

    What’s wrong with Slackware? If your objective is to make the most out of GNU/Linux, then surely Slackware is the way to go?

  12. kurkosdr says:

    had abandoned = has abandoned

  13. kurkosdr says:

    Which of course means our Shuttleman had abandoned the idea of making a Mac OS X clone and a brand on it’s own, and is now just providing YAD (yet another distro). I wonder what this means for Mir.

    BTW, I regret not installing Debian on my netbook and instead went for Ubuntu. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to get rid of the Ubuntu thing on the netbook without nuking the windows partition it’s dual-booted with.

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