How Operating Systems May Affect The US Presidential Election 2016

I had a chuckle yesterday. Rand Paul, one of the GOP candidates stated that the polls were “off” because many young people use smartphones…

I’ve been thinking of this for hours and it occurred to me that Paul is correct. The Donald has been the “front runner” in the polls lately but his supporters tend to be less-educated and older… Oh-oh! Rand Paul, Bernie Sanders and other though have a better connection with younger/more educated folks, you know, the ones with smartphones glued to their hips. The pollsters are likely dialling landlines. The youngsters’ smartphone-numbers may not be in their databases. Ordinarily, I’d say this was a small effect except that The Donald just bowed out of the next debate in Iowa, probably thinking he has a solid lead and has nothing to lose… Instead, a lot of those keen university students with smartphones may well tune in to make their final decision, and Trump won’t even be there. What a difference an operating system can make. What a difference ignoring technology can make.

I noticed too that Trump pays a lot of attention to polls but is utterly ignorant of technology. He was saying that Bloomberg is a “phony” rich guy because his wealth depends on a single technology and could evaporate with a sudden change of technology. Clearly Trump doesn’t get it, that the world has moved on from landlines, and it matters. Just like desktop operating systems, if one is making $millions per annum from using some technology, there isn’t much pressure to change the technology even if it costs $thousands per annum. Bloomberg gets that. Trump doesn’t. Youngsters and Trump’s competitors get that smartphones are as vital as air these days. Trump doesn’t.

UPDATE The results are inmuddled. Despite having tested and trained in the use of M$’s new software for reporting to HQ the results in real time, the parties mumbled that 10% of caucuses had “insufficient staff” and had to rely on consensus by the candidates to get the final results. 16h later there is still ~1% uncertainty, not enough to matter to the order of finish, Cruz first, Trump second, Rubio third, nearly an even split in delegates… So much for Trump’s invincibility/winner-status. The Democrats are little better. Despite far fewer candidates, the margin of Clinton over Sanders is less than the uncertainty in polling results… With such tiny margins in the results, everything must have mattered despite what pundits/fans/apologists proclaimed.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in Linux in Education, technology, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

79 Responses to How Operating Systems May Affect The US Presidential Election 2016

  1. Deaf Spy says:

    Robert, did you ever read your own references, or are you just blindly throwing them into the mix, lured by the title only? Hey, I thought that was a prerogative of Fifi and Doggie only. Sad to see you embarrass yourself in such a way.

    Focus on RedHat’s whitepaper. Read it and please explain how exactly it guides banks to replace Windows software with Linux software.

  2. Deaf Spy wrote, “Robert, there is exactly ZERO chance your bank will go to Linux.”

    see 50 Places Linux is Running That You Might Not Expect and Banking On Linux and Linux Foundation Unites Industry Leaders to Advance Blockchain Technology

    The world, even bankers, can and do make their own software and share it.

    Banks hire Linux people. see Senior IT Security Specialist (Linux Architecture)

  3. Deaf Spy says:

    If they are forced to change OS, they might as well change to GNU/Linux.
    This is a mystification that confuses the mind.

    Given a software product working perfectly well on XP SP3, what are the chances it runs well on:
    1. Windows 10.
    2. On whatever Linux distro.
    (Virtualization is not to be mentioned, as it is possible on both platforms).

    Robert, there is exactly ZERO chance your bank will go to Linux.

  4. Deaf Spy says:

    My bank, for instance, is still using XP on brand new hardware.

    Sigh. Microsoft ended XP’s extended support almost two years ago, while mainstream support ended in 2009. If your bank is indeed using brand new hardware, they are paying MS to support it for them, because MS is not supporting any new hardware for XP.

    Or perhaps their hardware is not that new at all. How do I know? Simple. Here is a quick quiz:
    1. Can XP work properly on anything with more than 3G of RAM? No.
    2. Can XP support USB 3.0? No.
    3. Can XP support properly quad-core CPUs? No. (For the nitpickers: technically, it runs, but either reports incorrect number of logical CPUs, or the scheduler wouldn’t even use more than two).
    4. Last, but not least: are most hardware manufacturers are still supporting drivers for XP? No.

    The staff are used to that software and resist change.

    And that comes from the guy who advises Munich to upgrade LO to fix their broken mail-merge. Smug.

  5. ram says:

    The trouble is in America, people don’t vote but machines do. That means whoever programs the voting machines or the card tallying machines can (and does) determine the outcome of the “election”. I personally witnessed this in Virginia in 1980. Gave up on voting in the USA after that.

  6. DrLoser says:

    Anyway, back to the excellent observation at the top of this post.

    Instead, a lot of those keen university students with smartphones may well tune in to make their final decision, and Trump won’t even be there. What a difference an operating system can make. What a difference ignoring technology can make.

    That was absolute bollocks, wasn’t it, Robert? Nothing that happened in the Iowa Caucus supports your farcical monomaniacal beliefs. Not even with one of your fabled “five data points and a projection” guess.

    Nothing.

    And nothing that happens in New Hampshire will support your wild prognostication.

    Nor will Super Tuesday, or whatever day it is in 2016.

    Nothing.

    By the way, how’s the hunt for the latest Thin Client going? Did you take my advice and buy a $99 Kangaroo?

    It’s all the rage amongst young voters in Iowa, I understand.

  7. DrLoser says:

    I stand corrected. It was Deaf Spy. It’s hard to tell one from the other sometimes.

    Considering that one of us is Bulgarian (with a better command of the English language than, say, Dougie, I will admit) and one of us is British, I fail to see how hard the distinction would be.

    Think of it as an object lesson in distinguishing between students in the Far North, Pog. As a teacher, one very basic skill you need to master is to treat your students as individuals, not merely as practically identical slavish blobs on whom your sole desire is to foist pointless FLOSS crap that will damage them for the rest of their miserable lives.

    See? Not a difficult thought experiment at all, really. Assuming that you were ever up to it, which I doubt very much.

  8. DrLoser says:

    Yet, you cannot refute anything I post here.

    That seems like a decent, honest, challenge, Dougie. Most unlike you, if I may say, because I have never really been convinced that you are decent or even honest.

    Let’s rip! Pick me a factually testable post of yours. Link to that post. Let’s see if I can refute it, or at least poke massive holes in it.

  9. DrLoser wrote, “I wrote no such thing, Dog-Brain.”

    I stand corrected. It was Deaf Spy. It’s hard to tell one from the other sometimes.

    OTOH, I’m not totally senile yet. While parking the car, I found one of my Chinese mousetraps had been tripped. No body… While stooping to reset the trap, I found my missing spool of copper wire buried under stuff. I’ve been seeking it to make inductors for the inverters/switching regulators I’m going to build. Now, I have all my ducks in a row, so to speak. I have yet another reason to go on living.

    The reason I drove the car today was to retrieve yet more parcels the Post Office notified me were waiting. Nope… I had received all my Chinese Christmas presents. The PO had delayed delivery of a “final notice” to pick up the parcels and took a month to sort them out on Moon or some remote place. Chuckle… The Chinese are definitely faster and more efficient than the Canadian PO. Oh well, out of that chaos came 10 pounds of 14 gauge copper magnet wire. It’s all good. 😉

  10. DrLoser says:

    Your mojo be weak, resorting to name-calling and not even discussing the facts.

    Considering that the original proposition (facts or otherwise) originated with Deaf Spy, Dog-Brain, I hardly see the need.

    Engage me on details that I post myself, and I might lower myself to your somewhat pedestrian standards.

  11. DrLoser says:

    Hippopotami? Octopodes? Slowly Parboiled Frogs?

    Alas and alack, I have lent my copy of Strunk and White to a very dear friend. FLOSS in action, if I may say so. And why should I stop there? Here is a free copy.

    It doesn’t seem to mention slowly parboiled frogs, although such things are a minority interest, largely confined to the more wretched areas of accidentally suburban Manitoba.

    It doesn’t really help with getting confused over the names of regular contributors to this blog, either.

    Not really surprising. Neither Strunk nor White were senile.

  12. dougman says:

    Really, is that the best you can do?

    Your mojo be weak, resorting to name-calling and not even discussing the facts.

    LOL..

  13. DrLoser says:

    DrLoser, not getting backwards compatibility, wrote, “You buy new hardware to run new software”

    I wrote no such thing, Dog-Brain.

    Whoops, Pog. Easy to confuse two equally unqualified ignoramuses.

  14. DrLoser, not getting backwards compatibility, wrote, “You buy new hardware to run new software”

    No. My bank, for instance, is still using XP on brand new hardware. I guess it’s not Skylake stuff, but they definitely are clinging to old software yet they want shiny new stuff for staff. The staff are used to that software and resist change. OTOH, the staff can easily adapt to a new keyboard, monitor or CPU. Banning Skylake and later hardware is M$’s rude way of pressuring my bank to change. I’d bet my bank would drop M$ in an instant if they could get the old software to run on new hardware with GNU/Linux. I’d bet there is a way to do that, like using FLOSS and making the FLOSS behave the way they want… If they are forced to change OS, they might as well change to GNU/Linux.

  15. Deaf Spy says:

    ◾braking backwards compatibility, about the most-loved feature of TOOS,

    Hm, not really. Fact is that most software that worked under 7 works quite well under 10 as well. The only exception I have is Turbo Delphi 2006. For some unknown reason, that piece of crap requires Microsoft .NET 1.1 and J# 1.0 runtime, which don’t work on 8, 8.1 and 10.

    At the same time, 10 runs properly even an ancient Dr. Zeuss Green eggs and ham game, designed for Windows 95.

    ◾forcing folks who buy new PCs to migrate to a new OS whether or not they want to do that, and
    ◾this Intel Skylake thing is on top of the forced downloads and nag-screens, about the most-hated features ever implanted in TOOS

    Both are irrelevant. See, Robert, you don’t buy new hardware to run old software. You buy new hardware to run new software, and this new software too often requires new OS, too.

    People will buy new hardware and upgrade everything along. As they have always done.

    Buy. Not unearth from the nearest Dumb.

  16. Ooohhh! If a fan of M$ is that ticked off, imagine all the folks who hate M$…. They will be motivated to try GNU/Linux. Expect to see growth in the next couple of years that will make what we saw with XP seem like a picnic on a hot summer’s day.

    Takeaways:

    • braking backwards compatibility, about the most-loved feature of TOOS,
    • forcing folks who buy new PCs to migrate to a new OS whether or not they want to do that, and
    • this Intel Skylake thing is on top of the forced downloads and nag-screens, about the most-hated features ever implanted in TOOS.

    I think what we are seeing is what I predicted years ago. The truly locked-in will become more locked-in and forever supporting M$ in the manner to which it has become accustomed, and anyone with any initiative, or access to a teenager, will move to other operating systems like Android/Linux, Chrome OS GNU/Linux, GNU/Linux or Apple’s stuff. Since Apple won’t let its stuff run on just any hardware but Apple’s, it’s */Linux that will welcome the refugees from brutality in IT.

  17. dougman says:

    “Windows 10 had 9.96 percent market share in December, and gained 1.89 percentage points to hit 11.85 percent in January.”

    You would think that giving the OS away, droves of people would be jumping on this, but no, no one is and its being crammed down peoples computers and forcibly being installed.

    http://tech.slashdot.org/story/16/02/02/1719204/windows-10-passes-windows-xp-in-market-share

  18. dougman says:

    re: Yet another instance in which you prove yourself entirely incapable of addressing the subject at hand.

    Yet, you cannot refute anything I post here.

  19. DrLoser says:

    There is a reason why a certain renderer’s installation script includes the comment: “Fuck it, I’ll do it in perl. Shell drives me crazy”. Shell languages are unnecessarily obtuse and disastrous mistakes are easy to make.

    Ivan makes an essential point here. Let’s stipulate that, in the perfect world, there is no other operating system than *nix. It isn’t necessary to narrow that stipulation down further to Gnu/Linux, but should you wish, we can narrow the stipulation.

    Given that stipulation …

    Why would any remotely sane person prefer the bash shell to Perl?

    (I exempt edge-cases such as Grub from this question, although quite frankly I think one should be able to fit a basic Perl interpreter into the same footprint as a Bash shell these days.)

  20. DrLoser says:

    Que the adolescent insults…

    Not quite fair to 99% of adolescents in North America, Wiz.

    Generally speaking, they either have an HSE or are with eighteen months or so of obtaining one.

    And not quite fair to Dougie, either. Being incapable of attaining an HSE, all he has left is … insults.

  21. DrLoser says:

    No need. Trump who was leading in all the polls came in 2nd or 3rd depending on when you turned off the TV.

    Which of course is all down to the Awesome Power of Small Smart Mobile Thingies, Wielded By The Youth And Inaccessible To The Pollsters, Robert.

    Well, no, actually. The difference between 23% (Trump) and 26% (Cruz) is more likely down to the fact that Trump didn’t bother to visit anywhere very much, whereas Cruz and his team exhaustively trawled through every tiny little hamlet in the state of Iowa.

    Old-fashioned politics, dummy. In fact, it has been described in precisely those terms on at least one reporting site (the BBC).

    You actually have no idea what an Iowa caucus is, do you, Mr Pogson?

    Re: People will continue using windows

    Thank you, Dog-Brain. Yet another instance in which you prove yourself entirely incapable of addressing the subject at hand.

  22. dougman says:

    Re: People will continue using windows

    Same thing was said about Kodak, Blackberry, Nokia, Blockbuster, etc.. business die all the time.

    Here are a list of reasons M$ will eventually go the way of the dinosaur.

    Inability to Innovate – Unable to produce new, noteworthy and fruit producing ideas.

    Inability to Stay Ahead of The Times – Only look at the here and now, no forward thinking.

    No Adjustments – Not adjusting to the market place or technology of competitors.

    Uncle Rico Syndrome – Just like Uncle Rico from Napoleon Dynamite was living off of his 1983 successes, many brands are living off of yesterday’s wins.

    The Top Stays The Same – Unwillingness to change the key leadership players (especially in upper management).

    Inbred Syndrome – Only hire from within and unwilling to bring outside folks with fresh eyes and fresh perspectives into the fold.

    Reluctance to Take Risks – Playing it safe for a prolonged a period of time can be detrimental. Most brand success stories have many instances of taking risks.

    Refuse to Surround Themselves With and Retain The Best – Letting key players leave without creating opportunities for them to stay. Some of the best innovations from high profile brands come from key players that were acquired from another brand.

    Unwillingness To Change – They simply want things to be the way that they used to be.

    Nadella quotes these three things for MS’s future.

    1. Windows 10 is going to usher in this new era of more personal computing. – Sure lets cram the latest version of Windows down everyones throat and only give businesses 18-months to do so. What new era? Forcing everyone to the Windows 10 is great tactic to hide what a flop it is, everyone seems to hate it.

    2. Windows 10 is going to run on everything from phones to tablets to surface hubs as well as to the HoloLens. – Phones, tablets, surface hubs?…LMAO! No one wants a M$ phone let alone a M$ tablet. Ask yourself, when was the last time you saw a M$ phone out in the public? Think really hard on that!

    3. Reinvention of even the category definition of business process and productivity. – Yes, lets rename and recategorize, business processes and productivity, by not calling malware and Trojan virus’s as little hiccups. Ooopps…sorry you just had a lil’ hiccup, just reboot three times and reinstall, you’ll be fine.

  23. wizard emeritus says:

    Ah dougie, always answering questions you were never asked…

    At any Rate, I hope that you realize that none of of your posts mean much to anyone but you. People will continue using windows no matter how many posts you throw at it, if only because there is nothing to be gained for many people, and a lot to lose by moving to a Linux based desktop platform.

    Que the adolescent insults…

  24. Ivan says:

    Non-trivial software has bugs. Who knew?

  25. Ivan says:

    Why would anyone right “rm -rf /” in the first place? Your argument is a non-sequitor and makes you look like a fool.

    Are you that set on winning an internet argument that you’d make that statement?

    https://github.com/ValveSoftware/steam-for-linux/issues/3671

    Users didn’t type anything but they lost /home. If you’d bother following the links to the moronix forums you’d find people mentioning the open source bumblebee driver that pulled a similar stunt in a system directory.

    There is a reason why a certain renderer’s installation script includes the comment: “Fuck it, I’ll do it in perl. Shell drives me crazy”. Shell languages are unnecessarily obtuse and disastrous mistakes are easy to make.

  26. DrLoser wrote, “Let’s see the results of that no doubt percipient theory. Shouldn’t take too long.
     
    I assume you will admit that you were wrong, if and when it becomes obvious, Robert?”

    No need. Trump who was leading in all the polls came in 2nd or 3rd depending on when you turned off the TV.

  27. luvr says:

    Wizard Emeritus said, “And that’s fine, but over time legacy BIOS will be phased out, so you are going to have to deal with UEFI one way or another, either straight up or in BIOS emulation mode.”

    Well, if you put it that way, then I’m already “dealing with UEFI,” since I have two laptops that have UEFI on board. However, I’m not what I call “dealing with UEFI,” since I’m running them in legacy BIOS mode. Everything UEFI is, therefore, not an issue for me. As far as I’m concerned, there are no EFI variables to overwrite.

    And whether or not there will ever come a day when I have to give in and “deal with UEFI” remains to be seen. Even though my desktop computers are pretty old (they’re running on AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core CPUs), they continue to do fine. If all goes well, I don’t intend to replace them anytime soon. Who knows what hardware I get to select by the time my desktop computers need replacing? By then, newer platforms may have emerged that aren’t affected by this UEFI crap.

  28. DrLoser says:

    I’m still hugely amused by that Heisenberg thing, Dog-Brain.

    Got any other ludicrous metaphors borrowed from a scientific field of which you know nothing at all to share?

    I mean, it’s not as though the choice is not infinite. You’ve got no clue about seventeenth century science, have you? Let alone quantum physics.

  29. DrLoser says:

    Instead, a lot of those keen university students with smartphones may well tune in to make their final decision, and Trump won’t even be there. What a difference an operating system can make.

    Fine. This is (casually) a testable observation.

    Let’s see the results of that no doubt percipient theory. Shouldn’t take too long.

    I assume you will admit that you were wrong, if and when it becomes obvious, Robert?

    No, wait. I know you too well. You’d never do that.

  30. DrLoser says:

    Re: You have no idea what these twenty lines might be, do you?

    Never said I did, but I am sure if you use your “glorious” BS credentials, you could get Matthew Garrett to inform you.

    Thing is, Dog-Brain, if you don’t actually know what those twenty lines are, you have no relevant opinion on whether or not they apply, do you?

    You might sneer at education, but one of the things it teaches sixteen year olds (or even bright ten year olds) is that you do not depend upon an argumentum ad verecundiam.

    And since that is all you have here — and I might add that Matthew will almost certainly dispute your ignorant misuse of his words —

    You have NOTHING.

  31. dougman says:

    Re: You’re not a programmer, Dougie.

    Never said I was, nor do I ever aspire to be so.

    Re: You’re not even a sysadmin.

    Bloody hell, and thank GOD. This one of the reason I sold my SMB.

    Re: You have no idea what these twenty lines might be, do you?

    Never said I did, but I am sure if you use your “glorious” BS credentials, you could get Matthew Garrett to inform you.

    BTW, Windows 8 and 10 supports code injection from UEFI during the boot process. Lenovo used this method to distribute crapware.

    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/08/lenovo-used-windows-anti-theft-feature-to-install-persistent-crapware/

    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/windows-nemesis-bootkit-financial-industry,30703.html

    Thank GOD, as a Linux user, there is no need to worry about the problems associated with Windows.

  32. dougman says:

    Re: Easy to mistype a single line of bash

    Why would anyone right “rm -rf /” in the first place? Your argument is a non-sequitor and makes you look like a fool.

  33. dougman says:

    Hidey-ho!.. its Mr. Wizard and Dr.Tosser to the rescue!

    Truth be told, I am a political atheist, but eh.

    Re: And we care because, Dougie? Oh I knew you wouldn’t care, but I brought to light that the same problems occur for Windows. UEFI is a failure from day one.

  34. DrLoser says:

    Imagine that, M$ having vulnerabilities!

    Imagine that, Dog-Brain suddenly finding himself in bed with a Socialist from Vermont!

    Wonders will never cease.

  35. DrLoser says:

    Matthew says with about 20 lines of code on Windows, you can cause the same havoc.

    Which is 19 more lines than it takes on Linux. Difficult to mis-type twenty lines, I would think. Easy to mistype a single line of bash.

    Which isn’t really the point. You’re not a programmer, Dougie. You’re not even a sysadmin. You have no idea what these twenty lines might be, do you? You’re just taking the statement on trust. (And ignoring the context in which it was made.)

    Don’t forget: having Administrator privileges on a Windows machine is not the same as having root privileges on a Linux machine. You’re not God — you are merely his Vicegerent on Earth.

    It might not make much of a difference if you are absolutely determined to wreck your own system … but it does make it “twenty times more difficult.”

    Disclaimer: I don’t like the NT security system much, either. I’d rather see a commercial version of Midori — a fine research product from the Microsoft Labs, bringing amongst other things the benefits of the Capabilities Model of security to the mainstream.

    Sadly, economic imperatives being what they are, we are stuck with a choice between two rival security paradigms implemented in around 1990 (NT and Linux) and with roots stretching back two decades before that. Not a choice I would prefer, but given that choice, I am going to pick the one that works. Every time.

    (Clue: not li… why do I need to repeat this?)

  36. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “This is just confirmation that I’m right to stick with Legacy BIOS.”

    And that’s fine, but over time legacy BIOS will be phased out, so you are going to have to deal with UEFI one way or another, either straight up or in BIOS emulation mode.

    Keep in mind that UEFI is, in effect, a hardware subsystem OS that allows one to manage and configure hardware of a system before an OS is loaded. Because of this ,It has total control over the hardware. Why the fact that one can trash an OS image before it loads is some great surprise is to me laughable. UEFI is functioning as designed.

  37. Wizard Emeritus says:

    ““Matthew says with about 20 lines of code on Windows, you can cause the same havoc.”

    And we care because, Dougie?

  38. luvr says:

    To me, it just proves what a stupid idea UEFI is in the first place. Which is a pity, really, since it would have been nice to have a modern replacement for the aging BIOS. This is just confirmation that I’m right to stick with Legacy BIOS.

  39. dougman says:

    Uhhhhh… running rm -rf / is just stupid to begin with, but Deaf – Blind – Dumb Guy, you left out that that this affects UEFI systems and In addition, this issues also affects Windows as well!

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=UEFI-rm-root-directory

    “Matthew says with about 20 lines of code on Windows, you can cause the same havoc.”

    https://twitter.com/mjg59/status/693496443395399680

    To think that UEFI was suppose to save us…HAHAHAHAAH.

  40. Deaf Spy says:

    In the other news, how to brick your laptop when using Linux:
    http://thenextweb.com/insider/2016/02/01/running-a-single-delete-command-can-permanently-brick-laptops-from-inside-linux/

    The most interesting part is:
    “A thread discussing the issue on the systemd repository on GitHub is full of discussion between developers arguing that the directory where the EFI boot data is stored should not be entirely writable.”

    “Freedom, Sancho…”

  41. dougman says:

    “Closed source technologies from companies like Microsoft could, in theory, contain back-doors or vulnerabilities that hackers and evildoers could exploit. Even worse, Microsoft or its employees could purposely alter voting software to influence outcomes.”

    Imagine that, M$ having vulnerabilities!

    http://betanews.com/2016/01/28/bernie-sanders-campaign-is-right-microsoft-could-hurt-election-open-source-is-needed/

  42. dougman says:

    “For a long time, Microsoft has been criticized for having a problem with apps — the so-called app gap. People are simply not visiting the Windows Store, and this is something that undoubtedly upsets companies like TripAdvisor. Knowing that very few people are likely to visit the Store, there is perhaps little option other than forcing apps upon users if you want them to gain a following.”

    Are you ready for the new W10 crap?

    http://betanews.com/2016/01/28/brace-yourself-for-a-windows-10-crapware-explosion-pre-installing-tripadvisor-is-just-the-start/

  43. dougman says:

    I do say, it would appear that M$ lost the browser war in the long end.

    http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

    …and EDGE? No one wants to use a restrictive browser.

    http://betanews.com/2015/10/19/windows-10-users-ignore-microsoft-edge-for-a-reason/

  44. Interesting. M$ seems to have a Linux interface in “10”:
    “LXCore.sys = Linux version 3.4.0-Microsoft (Microsoft@Microsoft.com) (gcc version 4.7 (GCC) ) #1 SMP PREEMPT Wed Dec 31 14:42:53 PST 2014”

    If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em…

  45. dougman says:

    DrIdiot, knows no-level to his quackery. Robocalls are illegal and thought of as spam these days.

    47 U.S. Code § 227 – Restrictions on use of telephone equipment
    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/pdf/uscode47/lii_usc_TI_47_CH_5_SC_II_PA_I_SE_227.pdf

    Also, I predict a glorious failure on M$’s part.

    http://thehill.com/policy/technology/267586-microsoft-on-the-hot-seat-in-iowa

  46. DrLoser says:

    However, I don’t wish to be mean. This here is the opportunity to laugh with Werner Heisenberg: a man who would surely appreciate the following quantum physics joke.

    It’s 1943, and Werner is driving through Berlin in his government-issued Porsche towards his place of work.

    Just short of the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, the great man is flagged down by some sort of time-serving Prussian plod.

    Prussian Plod: Do you know what speed you were doing?
    Heisenberg: No, but I know exactly where I am!

    I’ll be here all night. Tip the veal and try the waitress.

  47. DrLoser says:

    Has anybody here found some way to reconcile the work of Werner Heisenberg (he of the “you can either measure the position or the velocity, but not both. Here, have a Planck Constant” theory) and “digital disruption?” No?

    I thought not. Or, alternatively (I await Fifi with some trepidation) Yes yes yes! Here are linkies!

    Ah well. I might not have many better things to do than to fix one of the endless bugs in a worthless piece of shit like LibreOffice, but one particular worthwhile thing stands out to me:

    Laughing at Dog-Brain’s ignorance.

  48. DrLoser says:

    No, they’re not. In many areas, robo-callers are not legal.

    And a vast amount of other unsupported imaginary rubbish.

    Look, Robert. If you have some sort of proof that political polling operations are somehow lacking in a list of mobile phone numbers, then by all means provide it.

    Otherwise, quit your gibberish.

  49. DrLoser wrote, “the reason for that is that they are on the database.”

    No, they’re not. In many areas, robo-callers are not legal. Unless a political party has had some previous contact with a person, they don’t have their number. Pollsters are under a lot of examination because no one wants dinner interrupted by a phone call of no benefit to the called party. That’s why there’s legislation about polling. Further, pollsters need to be able to say that a number/party called is in some particular location. They just can’t do that with mobile phones because the service can’t reveal the home address of users and mobile phones are mobile and not tied to tiny geographical areas. Pollsters could ask the location as a question but that’s another area of uncertainty in the poll and pollsters don’t want anything more than statistical uncertainty. They want to call ~1000 people and make certain conclusions. By calling cell-phones, they would have to call tens of thousands of times to get the sample they want.

    Look at the supply-chain: Samsung, some retailer, some network provider, the user, the pollsters. Polls based on cell-phones are way too inefficient. Hence, pollsters use landlines or lists of known people, not random samples from phone-space. Young people I know use smartphones almost exclusively and they move, a lot. e.g. I’ve met young people who carry a smartphone and don’t have a landline that might be in Florida last week, Toronto this week and in my home in Manitoba this weekend. What’s a pollster to do with that person? Nothing. They can’t ask that person how they’re going to vote anywhere or what they’re thinking about relevant to some organization concerned about some location.

    Everyone I respect who comments on the Iowa primaries states that the issues are beyond the pollsters simply because the minds are often not made up until the hour of voting. All the pollsters can say is that there is or is not smoke. They have no idea what’s burning nor where the fire is. Several campaigns are counting on youngsters who must come out to a challenging meeting for the first time. Several campaigns are counting on veterans who have to show up and fight in any weather. The veterans are most likely on some list. The youngsters probably are not and smartphones are part of the reason for that.

  50. DrLoser says:

    The pollsters are likely dialling landlines. The youngsters’ smartphone-numbers may not be in their databases.

    An interesting example of how propositions and conclusions are derived on this site. Let’s step through the process, shall we?

    1) Mr Pogson has absolutely no clue how political polling operations gather their information. (As it happens, I have little more.)
    2) Thus, given this blank slate, he is free to speculate wildly and at random and with no factual basis whatsoever.
    3) Here we see a fundamental bias influence the speculation.
    a) Mr Pogson isn’t really interested in the details of political polling operations. (Neither am I.)
    b) Mr Pogson is desperately interested in “proving” that anybody using Microsoft technology is shooting themselves in the foot.
    c) Mr Pogson is aware (as am I) that Microsoft’s share of the mobile phone market is in the low single digits.
    d) Mr Pogson thus convinces himself (but certainly not me) that the political polling operations, who are no doubt Microsoft Slaves, are missing out a huge chunk of relevant data sources, because … er … they are ignoring “youngsters” with “smart phones.”

    All very amusing, in a totally specious and intellect-free way.

    Now then, Robert, what about all the “oldsters” and “hipsters” with Apple phones? It doesn’t really seem likely that these guys are “not on the database,” now, does it?

    And the reason for that is that they are on the database. Not only that, but practically everybody with a Samsung/Android/Linux/Gnu mobile phone is on the database.

    Well, that’s about it for this hilariously misconceived article. Next one, please.

  51. Ivan says:

    That’s luxury, eh?

    No, Bob, that’s Toyota.

  52. DrLoser says:

    The “digital disruption trap” is an idea inspired by Werner Heisenberg’s work in quantum physics.

    That High School Equivalency is as far away as ever, isn’t it, Dougie?

  53. DrLoser says:

    M$, on the other hand, is more like a Cheetah. They think running fast and living in a tiny family group is a recipe for survival.

    And Debian is very much like a Sea Cucumber. They think that having a leathery skin and a single, branched gonad is aesthetically pleasing and the way of the future.

    Think that’s a cretinous comparison, Dog-Brain. Well, you’d be absolutely correct, for once. It is a cretinous comparison.

    But not half as cretinous as the comparison you just made.

    You’re a bit lost when you abandon your spurious links and try to think for yourself, aren’t you?

  54. DrLoser wrote, “Shades of the “Sears rototiller” all over again.”

    Nope. The snowblower is a Sears branded machine that has worked quite reliably for decades. I’ve done exactly four repairs in all that time: failed universal joint on the steering of the chute, a flat tire (my fault – I didn’t check the inflation regularly), cracked chute, and this bracket for the control of the auger. The current problem has not been diagnosed but it’s past the bracket and drive-belt… It’s very easy to start and handles our large driveway pretty easily. All the repairs have been in the last two years. It’s probably time to retire it. The engine probably has 500h of life left in it because the machine has only run a few hours each year, probably less than 200h total.

  55. DrLoser wrote, “these are desirable automobiles. And they work.”

    Nope. They are expensive boxes with wheels and engines. The Caddy cost $300 just to drive by a repair shop. I replaced water-pumps, alternators, fans, and horns multiple times. The alternator, for instance, had been redesigned repeatedly for greater output without increasing the diameter of the shaft. Result: repeated failures of bearings due to excessive flexing of the shaft. Fusing was also improper. A stalled fan burned out the wiring. The fans were two on the radiators. They ran in series or parallel for different speeds all with the same fuse. The Lexus has been better but last year it began to drain its battery overnight. With the new multimeter I measure 2A drain with the thing parked and everything shut off. I’ve had it into Toyota several times and they finally stated they could not fix it. There is a Lexus dealership on the far side of the city. I will probably take it there once before we sell the car. I have to disconnect the battery whenever I park the thing for long. I carry a wrench in my pocket just for that purpose. That’s luxury, eh?

  56. dougman says:

    Speaking of traps, M$ sure has itself in a pickle doesn’t it?

    All M$ has is Office, Windows, various iterations of hardware and acquired software that was purchased. In its entirety, they just stuff everything into one collective box, with no discernible long-term business model. M$ just does the same thing year after year, for example, how many times can you paint a new theme on its old shell?

    you see, M$ has itself wrapped in what is know as a digital disruption trap. The “digital disruption trap” is an idea inspired by Werner Heisenberg’s work in quantum physics. He postulated in 1927 that there was a limit to the measurement of complimentary variables. Put simply, you can’t determine both the position and the momentum of a subatomic particle simultaneously.

    In the world of digital technology, we see a similar problem.

    The more you try to refine your current business model with technological innovation, the more you are exposed to the risk your competitors will do it better with more scalable, more interoperable technologies.

    Successful digital companies in the future need to behave like Zebras. They cooperate and share the ecosystem, hence opensource.

    M$, on the other hand, is more like a Cheetah. They think running fast and living in a tiny family group is a recipe for survival.

    Cheetahs are an endangered species.

  57. DrLoser says:

    Have you ever, even once in your life, considered buying a professionally engineered bit of kit that actually works, Robert?

    Now, wait up here. I am being completely unfair. You have bought one or more Cadillacs, and one or more Lexuses.

    For the teeming millions out in the real world, these are desirable automobiles. And they work.

    We have yet to learn the reasons why they did not work for Mr Pogson.

    My tentative guess is that he tried to boil a frog in the oil reservoir … or perhaps something even more exotic, no doubt involving FLOSS.

    It would be charming, however, should Robert choose to “share” his experiences. Cadillac or Lexus: either would do.

    That’s the great thing about the Capitalist System. You get to choose your very own Massive Disappointment.

  58. DrLoser says:

    Let us note the important qualifier, “again.”

  59. DrLoser says:

    Nothing. I have more important issues like the recent failure of the auger drive again in the snowblower…

    May one assume, Mr Pogson, that (as usual) you were being miserly with your snowblower requirement, and sourced some weird bit of kit (via Alibaba or equivalent) that any Qualified Engineer would point out … had “issues” with the auger?

    Not that an auger is especially important when it comes to a snowblower.

    Shades of the “Sears rototiller” all over again.

    Have you ever, even once in your life, considered buying a professionally engineered bit of kit that actually works, Robert?

    I doubt it. Right now, you appear to be the Poster Child for an ancient miserable cheapskate who accumulates broken crap in the unfulfilled hope that, somehow, you can just about scrape by with a bit of spot-welding here and a bit of uninformed shell-script there.

    My heart goes out to you. You deserve better than this, after all that you have given to Mankind. (Non-Jewish.)

  60. DrLoser says:

    I’d agree with that but that still doesn’t excuse deliberate technological traps.

    Let us stipulate that the possibility of a “deliberate technological trap” exists, Robert.

    (What would one of those be?)

    Let us wave our hands around and whine about “deliberate technological traps.” We are all Senile. It is all we have left.

    But just for once, under the stipulation that such things exist and have any relevance over a period of more than a year or so …

    Kindly give us one particular egregious “technological trap.”

    One that affects consumers in 2016. Or has affected consumers since 2005.

    You’re completely clueless on this one, Robert.

  61. dougman wrote, “What does this bracket look like? How thick is the metal?”

    It’s just a strap with a bend in it welded to the frame. I just had the thing apart and the bracket’s holding. The clutch seems to work correctly. There must be a shear-pin that’s failed. I can’t see it. Perhaps another look tomorrow… I’ve had shear-pins fail in the auger and it has the same effect. The auger turns but not at full speed. I knew there were shear-pins in the auger but this one must be between the drive-pulley and the transmission, or else the transmission has died… We bought this thing over 20 years ago so it has served us well. The engine seems to be in great shape. Perhaps I’ll use it to drive the new alternator.

  62. DrLoser says:

    Now trending! Now trending! Dog-Brain vs The Wiz!

    A regrettable little thing is Twitter, but nonetheless. Read it and weep, because Dog-Brain sounds suspiciously like the IT avatar of Kanye West!

    You own waves???? I own your child!!!!

    Now, to be utterly fair, I’m sure that Dougie wouldn’t “own” somebody else’s child.

    And to be even more utterly fair, he doesn’t “own” their $500 IT set up, either.

    Not that it stops him trying. Much like Kanye West, apparently.

  63. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “Nothing. I have more important issues like the recent failure of the auger drive again in the snowblower…”

    I missed this response. So does this mean that anyone who is a Linux partisan is allowed any behavior on your site, Robert Pogson?

  64. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “I’d agree with that but that still doesn’t excuse deliberate technological traps. M$ could argue that all their dirty tricks were justified but that doesn’t make it so.”

    The fact remains, Robert Pogson, that one of your partisans deliberately set the kind of technological trap that would have gotten him banned elsewhere.

    What do you intend to do about it?

  65. dougman says:

    What does this bracket look like? How thick is the metal?

    I once made a very thick bracket by bending repetitive sheets of metal, stacking them and spot welding them together. Went the extra route of heat treating and annealing it in my BBQ grill at 700-degree F. Worked well enough for me.

  66. Wizard Emeritus wrote, “what do you intend to do with the vandalism that dougman visited in your blog”

    Nothing. I have more important issues like the recent failure of the auger drive again in the snowblower. I expect the weld to the ancient bracket failed again because the steel is just too brittle to be used in cold with repetitive strains. I’ll likely have to make a new bracket out of tougher material, today.

    On other news… I’ve now received all the goods I ordered from China. Of a dozen items only one is not satisfactory, an LED bulb that’s the wrong size. I can still use it by modifying a light-fixture, but it’s kind of bad when 118mm becomes 147mm. I’d have thought numbers translated better in Chinese. I guess not. It’s an error in my favour, however, as I get a larger lamp for the same price. Every other item arrived in good condition exactly as promised. The multimeter is a beauty. I will use it today, checking out a charging system on the car that’s been giving problems with a sticking relay.

  67. dougman wrote, “the bullshit spewed by loyalist M$ trolls on this blog, would constituted as “vandalism”.”

    I’d agree with that but that still doesn’t excuse deliberate technological traps. M$ could argue that all their dirty tricks were justified but that doesn’t make it so.

  68. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “I’m sure, and others that frequent here would agree, that the bullshit spewed by loyalist M$ trolls on this blog, would constituted as “vandalism”.”

    More noise Vandal.

  69. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “butthurt much?”

    You wish Vandal.

  70. dougman says:

    I’m sure, and others that frequent here would agree, that the bullshit spewed by loyalist M$ trolls on this blog, would constituted as “vandalism”.

    Eh.

  71. Wizard Emeritus says:

    So what do you intend to do with the vandalism that dougman visited in your blog, Robert Pogson?

  72. dougman says:

    Technology changes drastically every 15-years. Look how far Linux has come since 2000, when Windows 2000 and XP were prevalent. Nowadays, Linux is ubiquitous and growing steadily.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *