Smartphones, The New Implanted PCs

“Global smartphone shipments in the fourth quarter will increase to 396.8 million units, leading to 1.326 billion units for 2015 which will rise 10.1% on year.”
 
See Digitimes Research: Over 331 million smartphones shipped globally in 3Q15
Wow! M$ used to brag about being an ubiquitous platform. Whatever they were pales into insignificance in comparison to */Linux on the smartphone. In a single year, enough smartphones have shipped to replace most of the PCs running That Other OS in the world. I know at lot of those are replacements for the fashion-conscious but a lot are for first-time IT-owners in emerging markets. Even in established markets many people rarely touch a legacy PC and have these things strapped to their belts or in their warm hands most of the day. This is a revolution in IT making desktops and servers seem antiquated. Linux fuels it. Apple and M$ are just small players even though they make some money in it.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.

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20 Responses to Smartphones, The New Implanted PCs

  1. Wizard Emeritus says:

    “Just look at the MMP gaming ads on The Pirate Bay site 😉”

    Linky?

  2. ram says:

    Just look at the MMP gaming ads on The Pirate Bay site 😉

  3. Deaf Spy says:

    Linux Voice magazine has a monthly column called “Gaming on Linux” where they describe plenty of AAA titles that do most of their work on back-end servers.

    A-a-a, ram. No, ram. You made the claim. You bring the proof, OK? One Fifi is enough on this site.

    I want you to show me an AAA title, which does its graphics on a server, so that it can be played on a thin-client. Again, a 20GB local setup, requiring DX10 or 11 to run, does not count as thin-client.

  4. ram says:

    Linux Voice magazine has a monthly column called “Gaming on Linux” where they describe plenty of AAA titles that do most of their work on back-end servers.
    Find out more at:
    https://www.linuxvoice.com/

  5. Deaf Spy says:

    The trend there too is to put most of the work on the server and move to thin clients for the players.

    Really, ram? Tell us an AAA title that does it. Come on!

    At least I hope you don’t consider a 20GB setup, requiring DX11 to run, a “thin client”. That would be a major architectural mistake.

  6. ram says:

    “I get the feeling that you’ve never played a PC game before. In your entire life…”

    I’m not big on computer games, but my servers do host Tesseract (http://tesseract.gg)(successor to Cube2, http://sauerbraten.org/) rendering/game engine development. Also host some “Massively multiplayer online games.

    The trend there too is to put most of the work on the server and move to thin clients for the players.

  7. antifanboy says:

    True enough. The outlook for consumer general purpose computers looks grim. Some people will still need general purpose workstations and servers — media creators, engineers, scientists, financial houses, but those are not consumers. Those already are mostly using Linux. Those machines also typically have thousands of cores and serious computational power.

    I get the feeling that you’ve never played a PC game before. In your entire life…

  8. DrLoser says:

    They were oversold. M$, the OEMs, retailers and ISVs conspired to make TOOS a necessity when it never was. UNIX and later GNU/Linux certainly could have handled much if any of the need. Instead a monopoly was forced on the world.

    Since there was never* such a thing as a System V Release 4 personal computer (let alone a lap-top), or a SunOS PC, or a Solaris PC, or an AIX PC, or a HP-UX PC, you appear to have lost this argument before you have begun it, Robert.

    Kindly explain what alternative the ISVs, the OEMs and the retailers had in the 1980s and early 1990s. And while you’re at it, kindly explain this new malapropism of yours, “much if any of the need.”

    (* Three candidates spring to mind. I’m a big fan of IRIX, and I’m pretty sure that a Gnu/Unix aficionado such as yourself, Robert, would have bought a Silicon Graphics workstation to go with those luxurious Cadillacs and Lexuses that you treated yourself to.

    Well, maybe at least a NeXTSTEP. What was with this obsession with shouty capital letters, anyway?

    And then, of course, some company or other came out with the perfectly serviceable Xenix. Right down your street. What with being an 8-bit Unix — as opposed to the 2-bit unices that are all that’s available these days — you wouldn’t even need to worry about “bloat” and “resource wastage.”

    And in fact one of the Unices I mention above did, indeed, come out with a PC version. I’m sure I don’t need to tell you which one.)

  9. ram wrote, “The outlook for consumer general purpose computers looks grim.”

    They were oversold. M$, the OEMs, retailers and ISVs conspired to make TOOS a necessity when it never was. UNIX and later GNU/Linux certainly could have handled much if any of the need. Instead a monopoly was forced on the world. That’s all crumbling now and, without monopoly, GNU/Linux will get a healthy part of what’s left. I doubt TOOS is getting more than 60% now. Instead folks are letting their old PCs get really old and when they buy something new, the cloud and the web make GNU/Linux a viable choice. Think Chrome OS GNU/Linux in schools. There’s just little need for those fat systems to create, find, modify and present information. A web-browser on a thin PC will do the job for most.

    I always felt the “PC” was oversold. I knew people who paid ~$5K for some of the early PCs who rarely if ever used them. Now, people get more use out of a smartphone than they ever did with legacy PCs, thanks to Android/Linux and the use of Java-like apps. Lots of folks who really need a legacy PC find GNU/Linux works for them.

  10. ram says:

    “That wouldn’t just do away with Windows. It would do away with OSX. And with the Linux Desktop. ”

    True enough. The outlook for consumer general purpose computers looks grim. Some people will still need general purpose workstations and servers — media creators, engineers, scientists, financial houses, but those are not consumers. Those already are mostly using Linux. Those machines also typically have thousands of cores and serious computational power.

  11. DrLoser says:

    That’s true ram, I was looking at CNC mills the other day and the computer that was offered was just an embedded device running a single application.

    In time, there will be no need for Windows.

    Do I understand this magnificent theory right? Apparently the claim is that you can have an embedded device (let’s for these purposes define such as “all the software is in the hardware”) for each and every computational purpose.

    That wouldn’t just do away with Windows. It would do away with OSX. And with the Linux Desktop. Also … also … it would do away with the need for server OSes. Sayonara Debian! Solaris! AIX! And yet again, Windows!

    OK, so I have here an embedded device that tells me the time. It’s called a wristwatch. I also have an embedded device that allows me to make phone calls, plus a few other things like using a teeny tiny little browser.

    Let’s see: I could do with one that allows me to design a database. Or build a roof. Or write a 100 page document. Or (shudder) create a Powerpoint slide show. Or quite frankly … well … use my programming skills.

    That would require software, wouldn’t it? And software would require an OS, wouldn’t it?

    Nope, sorry, don’t see it. There’s a good reason why people buy general-purpose computers.

    The clue is … in the name.

  12. kurkosdr says:

    No chance of virii or malware when the application is baked into the hardware.

    Does your application store or manipulate user data? Then what prevents an exploit from stealing those data? What prevents an exploit from injecting malicious code (aka malware) into main memory, which will execute for as long as the session lasts? In addition, if the application happens to be a browser, what provides guarantees against XSSes?

    In plain English, your strategy of “let’s make everything read-only” is like trying to thief-proof a bank by making sure all the materials it’s made of are unbreakable and unbendable. If you manage to do so, can you claim complete theft-proofness?

    In fact, such an immutable bank would present unique challenges when improvements to it’s access mechanisms need to be made to guard against any new tricks the thieves may come up with… have you made the connection yet? Or I am trying to explain the concept of security to a fruit fly?

  13. dougman says:

    That’s true ram, I was looking at CNC mills the other day and the computer that was offered was just an embedded device running a single application.

    In time, there will be no need for Windows.

  14. ram says:

    Embedded devices are also coming up fast. Most just run a single application, such as a browser, a media player, or a word processor, and don’t even have an operating system per se. No chance of virii or malware when the application is baked into the hardware. And they are cheap too!

  15. DrLoser says:

    Apple and M$ are just small players even though they make some money in it.

    Oh, I’d say that Apple make bazillions out of it, Robert. Which is, I would suggest, rather the point.

  16. dougman says:

    The trolls cannot deny the truth, that Win-Dohs in its entirety, is a failure in the mobile market.

  17. olderman says:

    “I don’t think Android/Linux has much about which to worry. In a competitive market, M$ is just another player.”

    That happens to be the developer of the the platform that hosts the applications that people have been using for decades and will continue to use if they can.

  18. Deaf Spy wrote, “Do you see how they are getting on par with Android 4.4. and 5 devices?”

    Nope. I see that on Wednesday, 2015-December-16, “10” had 11.17% of the desktop on StatCounter and on Sunday, 2015-December-13, it had 13.4%. That shows that people with choice refuse “10” even with all the coercion and trickery. On Wednesday, of all OS, StatCounter recorded 6.48% for “10”. On mobile, TOOS has 2.38%. I don’t think Android/Linux has much about which to worry. In a competitive market, M$ is just another player.

  19. Deaf Spy says:

    It is funny that the platform, being closest to Robert’s dream of smartphones replacing PCs, is… Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile with Continuum.

    Btw, Robert, does it hurt to see how Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 tablets, powered by Atoms are becoming increasingly popular in Chinese sites like Alibaba, Banggood and DX? Do you see how they are getting on par with Android 4.4. and 5 devices?

  20. kurkosdr says:

    Let’s wait and see how well Android “N” does, which will be the first version that will do things like mouse support and multiwindows properly, before declaring victory, right Pog?

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