Service

Pigs do fly if you throw them hard enough… That’s what M$ is attempting with its next release.“With Windows 10, we think of the operating system as ‘Windows as a service’,"…In next few years, you could think of Windows as one of the largest internet services on the planet. The question of ‘what version are you running’ will cease to make sense.” Freedom isn’t just about the price. An operating system isn’t a service. One needs software on a device to make it seem intelligent, nothing more. Bundling that other OS with every kind of device on the planet doesn’t make any sense at all. What use is M$’s EULA on a mobile device in a dynamic environment with zero to thousands of other devices all sharing networked services? What use is M$’s EULA when your device can do everything but M$ insists you don’t? Does anyone care if the licence to use the OS is $0 but you have to pay M$ to do anything with it? Nope. Nothing. Nada.

Reducing the price charged to $0 for something of negative value still doesn’t make it a good deal. This is an attempt to keep bundling that other OS with devices but the world won’t buy it. The world, billions of people, have tasted freedom with Android/Linux and millions with GNU/Linux. They aren’t about to sell their souls to M$ because the price of a device drops somewhat.

That’s just the consumer. Think of the OEM and retailer. The retailer has had stocks of M$’s stuff collecting dust on retail shelves for a year. They aren’t about to restock. OEMs have been making larger margins selling */Linux on devices for years now. They are not about to stop. In fact, even if M$ pays them to load that other OS, OEMs will still increase their shipments of */Linux because selling more units beats selling fewer units.

So, this is what the End Times looks like. M$ is desperately trying to remain relevant by giving the OS away or paying OEMs to distribute it. In the process, more resources will be wasted on products that don’t sell. It will be interesting to see whether or not ISVs, who have not really been independent for decades, will want to rewrite their software one more time in hopes that Wintel does not drag them down together. There are already a few million beta-testers of M$’s ware. An ecosystem of ~100million users might be enough to justify further investment but those other billions of potential users are definitely a bigger market. Expect M$ to raise its rates for “services” to pay for it all. Expect all kinds of software to move to the web where it belongs in order to get off the Wintel treadmill. Expect */Linux to be the OS of the next decade on client and server.

If you really want service from your software use really free software, software that works for you and not for M$. I recommend Debian GNU/Linux, a product of the world freely shared without an onerous EULA from Hell. You can install thousands of packages of software with a few clicks and you can examine it, modify it, use it and share it without jumping through any more hoops. It’s been available for years for one low price, $0. I look forward to Monday’s release of financial information from M$. */Linux must have done a number on them to decide it’s better to give it away for $0 rather than to become irrelevant. IMHO, giving something away for $0 doesn’t raise the value of something negative to $0. It just makes it easier to spread, like a disease.

See Microsoft to give away Windows 10 FREE – for ONE year.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
This entry was posted in technology and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

49 Responses to Service

  1. dougman says:

    M$ couldn’t pay me to use Win-Dohs.

  2. oe says:

    MS would have to PAY ME for me to use Windoze, never-mind giving it for free……

  3. dougman wrote, “in 15-years time M$ will not be the major driver of IT”.

    That’s an easy bet. I think they’ve lost it already with OEMs largely hedging their bets since ~2003. The Moon did not fall on their heads so they feel free to do more this year. Expect all Hell to break lose for M$ by end of 2015. M$ could even drop out of mobile by then and since “client” will decrease in importance on the financials, they could chuck that too and leave all their “partners” in the lurch. M$ could sell cloud-services and server OS to their most loyal customers. Heck, they might even cut their losses (it cost $ to make that other OS) and ship GNU/Linux. I hope I live to see that day 8-)). That would make more sense than fighting FLOSS which they cannot beat. All it would take is a good PR campaign to explain it all.

  4. dougman says:

    re: “Don’t tell them. Show them or let them try it themselves.”

    Hence Android and ChromeOS.

  5. DrLoser wrote, “Robert who bangs on about the Four Freedoms, but somehow always comes back to “this is great! I don’t have to pay for it!”

    $freedom is not what it’s all about. $freedom is a side-effect of Software Freedom. If users have the right to copy and or modify the software, it costs them almost nothing to distribute the software so the price is likely to be $0, a free beer or dinner. For the young, poor etc. $freedom is a great feature of FLOSS. Don’t knock it. In schools, it allowed us to decide what changes we wanted and just do it rather than make a budget-request for next year. That’s priceless. Other side-effects of the Four Freedoms include flexibility (no EULA forbidding perfectly reasonable uses of hardware), freedom (relatively) from malware (many eyes), and performance (if some software doesn’t perform, someone will tweak it and share)…

  6. ssorbom wrote, “When I tell them Linux is legitimately free, they often either express worry that it will be hard to use, or complain that Linux does’nt have a specific application.”

    Don’t tell them. Show them or let them try it themselves. I’ve had folks try a GNU/Linux PC without knowing what it was and they liked it, found it easy to use like XP, and snappy. The particular app thing happens but many ordinary users haven’t memorized all the menus and shortcuts of a particular application. If there are menus they can navigate it’s all good. Remember, a good part of the world uses Chrome Browser or FireFox and they don’t find either or both strange at all. When my Little Woman moved to GNU/Linux, I thought it would be way more trouble than keeping that other OS running on her PC but it was much less. She used the same browsers and she was not an expert with any spreadsheet application. Now she does simple things with Gimp/LibreOffice and most things just work as she expects them. She is one of the least computer-literate people you will find. If something isn’t “intuitive” to her, it’s full stop. She had trouble with DOS and Lose 3.1… It took her 6 years to become comfortable with XP. Fortunately XFCE4 is close enough for her purposes.

  7. ssorbom says:

    What i mean by “Windows Tax” is a given amount of extra money computed into the final price of a PC when valid copy of Windows is bundled with the hardware (typically pre-installed).
    The extra money is *usually* the asking price of a Windows licence, unless the OEM and Microsoft have a special deal. In theory, Boxes where the vendors don’t pay this cost are cheaper for the consumer.

  8. dougman wrote, “People use to ask me what is a EULA”.

    That’s simple: End of User Liberty Assignment.

  9. dougman quoted, “I wonder what Mr. Betz calls knowing about the vulnerability and taking more than three months to fix it.”

    Due diligence… “getting value” for their IP… maximizing lock-in (both the malware-artists and consumers have to cling to their OS)… maintaining quality (SARCASM)… serving users (ROFL!).

  10. ssorbom wrote, “marketing Linux as something that is free doesn’t work”.

    Certainly it works. Just line up two identical machines, one sucking big time and costing ~$150 more than the one with GNU/Linux. I’ve done that many times. The last place I worked had service superior to brand new machines with that other OS compared to the performance we got with hand-me-down 6-8 year old boxes. It’s amazing what hardware can do when it’s tuned up to work for the user and not M$. All M$ wanted was a paid copy seeking all over the disc on each PC. All we needed was a terminal server with enough RAM and storage with software cached and a bit of gigabit/s networking. The old equipment configured that way was several times faster than M$’s straight-jacket allowed.

  11. dougman wrote, “a “Windows Tax” is having to waste hours dealing with malware and stupid M$ dicta”.

    For me, it’s much more. The restraint of the market caused by the desktop monopoly has harmed small businesses and creative people all over the world. M$’s tax is just the tip of the iceberg. They brag that X times their licensing fee is the economic “benefit” but much of it is just a compounding of the tax. Then there is the certainty many “partners” have that M$’s licence costs $X for their competitors that allows them to quote far above the market value of their work. I was once involved in a project that got quotes of $1K per PC for a school when really good PCs cost $700 in the market even with that other OS. We used thin clients and got twice the IT that contractor would have provided. Instead of just clients we got servers, tons of RAM and storage, and gigabit/s networking switches, printers, scanners and cameras. If the school had accepted that bid, they would have had very little except PCs in the budget.

    It is a crime against humanity that M$ should be allowed to charge so much and be so little accountable to the consumers.

  12. dougman says:

    Please define “Windows Tax”.

    For me and tens of millions of others, a “Windows Tax” is having to waste hours dealing with malware and stupid M$ dicta.

  13. ssorbom says:

    My point was that marketing Linux as something that is free doesn’t work. That’s not really why people find it attractive (when they do). You would be suprised how many Windows boxen I see when I go to Linux conferences.
    Inference: If they are at a Linux Con running windows they probably dual boot (or use a VM), but either way:
    P2: If they are willing to show off their machine at a conference, it probably means the copies of Windows I see are legit, therefore:
    Conclusion: They aren’t saving themselves the “Windows Tax” by using Linux

  14. dougman says:

    M$ talks about disservice: http://www.techspot.com/news/59379-microsoft-claims-google-software-bug-disclosure.html

    Best comment: “”Chris Betz, the senior director at Microsoft’s Security Response Center, said in a blog post that the company believes full disclosure of a vulnerability ahead of a fix becoming “broadly available” is doing a “disservice” to millions of users and the systems they use on a daily basis.” If disclosing the vulnerability is doing a disservice to users I wonder what Mr. Betz calls knowing about the vulnerability and taking more than three months to fix it.”

    Speaking of which I found this tidbit and people are just tired of M$, this is why the ‘service’ that Chromebooks provide “immediate logon” and web access is key to it becoming popular and selling so well. The solution for waiting on M$ software is to just walkaway and make a tea, is not viable long term.

    I have a consumer report, “I purchased a new laptop, Windows 8 shows 148 updates and to upgrade to 8.1, it took me 7 hours updating and 3 hours downloading and installing 8.1, for a total of 10 hours.”

    Imagine buying a car, but after signing the lease you cannot drive it, sorry come back tomorrow after all the additional service work is done.

  15. dougman says:

    People use to ask me what is a EULA.. LOL, I kid you not. I would state that it was that thing you agreed to, when you first turned on your computer.

    ssorbom’s comment reminded me of Ken Starks and the teacher debacle: “After confiscating the disks I called a conference with the student and that is how I came to discover you and your organization. Mr. Starks, I am sure you strongly believe in what you are doing but I cannot either support your efforts or allow them to happen in my classroom. At this point, I am not sure what you are doing is legal. No software is free and spreading that misconception is harmful. These children look up to adults for guidance and discipline. I will research this as time allows and I want to assure you, if you are doing anything illegal, I will pursue charges as the law allows. Mr. Starks, I along with many others tried Linux during college and I assure you, the claims you make are grossly over-stated and hinge on falsehoods. I admire your attempts in getting computers in the hands of disadvantaged people but putting linux on these machines is holding our kids back.”

    Another thing it reminded me was the old “it would be illegal to remove Windows” saying.

    LOL…talk about desperate measures.

  16. ssorbom says:

    Edit: sorry, dougman wrote the cited comment, my bad

  17. ssorbom says:

    Mr. Pogson wrote:
    “Consumers will demand the OS be free for years…’Well if you don’t give it to me free, we’ll just stick it to Microsoft and move to Linux then, eh!!’”
    Not from what I’ve seen. The people who think that way typically have no scruples about pirating software. When I tell them Linux is legitimately free, they often either express worry that it will be hard to use, or complain that Linux does’nt have a specific application. When I point out to them that what they are doing is a violation of the EULA, they shrug. When I claim that this opens them up to legal action, they shake their heads. When I tell them it is wrong to violate a contract, they laugh in my face.

  18. DrLoser says:

    BTW, you never did define the terms ‘freeloader’ and ‘pyramid of schmucks’, in the context of Linux users for everyone.

    Fair enough, Dougie. Here come the definitions:

    Freeloader: Someone like you or Robert who bangs on about the Four Freedoms, but somehow always comes back to “this is great! I don’t have to pay for it! I don’t even have to write code or submit bug reports or test anything! All I have to do is to sit on my fat butt and wait for other people to do all that stuff!.

    So much for “freeloaders.”

    Defining the pyramid of schmucks is slightly more difficult, because to be honest I don’t really believe that one exists; otherwise the freeloaders would be able to wallow around forever.

    However, and evidently you were not smart enough to catch this obvious reference, my pro-tem definition of a “pyramid of schmucks” refers to the sort of sadly deluded teenager who contributes his news-round money to that spectacular $6341.94 you mentioned.

    Go build a bigger pyramid of schmucks, Dougie!

  19. dougman says:

    Re: And why is that a “real problem?” You obviously do not understand human nature.

    BTW, you never did define the terms ‘freeloader’ and ‘pyramid of schmucks’, in the context of Linux users for everyone.

    Here is an article that explains perfectly what Robert is talking about, the model chosen of discounting prices is NOT sustainable in the long term.

    http://www.computerworld.com/article/2843969/drastic-price-cuts-may-damage-pc-industry-jeopardize-microsofts-hopes-for-windows-10.html

    “In the span from Oct. 5 to Oct. 25, the ASP (average selling price) of Windows-powered personal computers was $430, down 10% from the year before, according to NPD’s data. During the week of Oct. 5, the Windows notebook ASP was even less: $415.

    “In contrast, the ASP last year at this time was around $480, a monumental change in pricing for a category that had seen stable pricing for the last few years,” Baker said of the “Black Friday”-like numbers.

    Although the price cuts were good news to consumers shopping for a PC, Baker questioned what the business would look like in 2015. “I would say this is damaging rather than unsustainable”

    See, competition causes firms to develop new products, services and technologies, which would give consumers greater selection and better products. The greater selection typically causes lower prices for the products, compared to what the price would be if there was no competition (monopoly) or little competition (oligopoly). This is what has happened between M$ and the rest of the IT vendors.

    Glazing over a dated issue of consumer reports, the main factors for buyers are:
    – Social Proof (testimonials) also word-of-mouth plays an important part here
    – Return Policy
    Pricing is not an immediate driver in sales.

    http://www.simon-kucher.com/sites/default/files/simon-kucher_consumer_insights_fall_winter_2013.pdf

    The slow death of M$ will be one of 1000 cuts and in 15-years time M$ will not be the major driver of IT.

  20. DrLoser says:

    M$ has a real problem. If they renounce revenues on the client OS for one year, consumers will rebel when asked to resume paying.

    And why is that a “real problem?” It clearly isn’t a problem for the year in which you get no client revenue (assuming there’s a good reason for this: you haven’t contradicted it).

    There’s no obvious reason why it should be a problem thereafter.

    In re which, Robert: I have made my predictions for the financial results of the M$ client division in the forthcoming quarterly results.

    Wanna make yours?

  21. DrLoser says:

    Do pigs really fly if you throw them hard enough, Robert? I think this proposition bears closer examination, what with your 19th century knowledge of parboiling a frog.

    I delved into the early history of flight (you’re welcome!), and my resulting observations are tentative though, I feel, pertinent.

    The earliest recorded “tower jumper” (in our more modern times, we call these people “suicides”) was Armen Firman, who achieved his otherwise dismal results by covering his body with vulture feathers. Why vultures? I don’t know. Perhaps he would have done better by strapping a pig to his back. He certainly couldn’t have done much worse.

    Fast-forwarding to 1806 (I’ll try to be brief), and we have 72-year-old General Guillaume Resnier de Goué who apparently tossed himself off on the ramparts of Angouleme. No sniggering at the back there.

    This early experiment in hang-gliding (there’s a plaque on the site: I’ve been there) earned General Willy a broken leg. I can’t help feeling that he would have done better with a pig strapped to his lower limbs. At least then he would have had fresh bacon for breakfast.

    And, in between, we have da Vinci and his famous Ornithocopter. I can’t see any reason why a pig should not be able to fly in an Ornithocopter. I suspect that the real reason that we have no evidence of pigs flying in the early 16th century is that Lenny V. was incredibly good at drawing male genitals, mysterious female smiles, and sundry apostles … but not very good at drawing pigs.

    Probably something to do with an unfortunate misunderstanding in the forest whilst dogging, or else a strange and inexplicably violent childhood accident.

    Anyway, whatever, Robert. You, of all people, should know that pigs cannot fly. You can even go to the extreme of suggesting escape velocity, which I think is an acceptable form of “flying.”

    Sadly, humans have done this. Dogs have done this. Monkeys have done this. Even eleven Canadians have done this.

    But, outside the Muppets, no pig has done this.

    I would personally claim, Robert, that “flying” requires slightly more inherent buoyancy than, say, the ballistics of “falling gracefully yet inevitably to a painful collision with the ground.”

    Perhaps you were thinking about bumblebees? They can’t fly, either.

  22. dougman says:

    I laughed at the one idiot comment in that link; someone actually thought that Win-Dohs belonged to them and stated that M$ cannot start charging again for updates, etc…

    LOL…obviously someone never read the M$ EULA.

  23. DrLoser wrote, “A problem for whom exactly, Fifi?
    The customer? The retailer? The wholesaler? The OEM? Microsoft?”

    M$ has a real problem. If they renounce revenues on the client OS for one year, consumers will rebel when asked to resume paying. M$ won’t be able to sell many licences at the “regular” price ever again. When a monopolist cuts prices, you know they are feeling competitive forces at last. M$ is having to match the price of FLOSS, $0. Of course they will try to nickel-and-dime the consumer to recoup their costs but then the consumer will know what IT costs and seek out more FLOSS. Advantage, FLOSS.

    We are witnessing a period of great change in IT. It’s comparable to the IC or PC revolutions of decades ago. The consumer who was powerless except to do without IT a few years ago is now in the driver’s seat. OEMs and retailers are being forced to give consumers what they want and that’s not high prices and enslavement to M$’s EULA.

  24. DrLoser wrote, “Much better to rely on a system whereby people like you and Robert get it for free, and a bunch of schmucks out there actually fund the damned thing.
    I can certainly see that as an advantage. If you’re a cheapskate.”

    This “argument” if you call it that is deficient many ways:

    • FLOSS is not about money. It’s about good IT and slowly but surely, FLOSS is taking share from M$ in every aspect of computing.
    • There’s nothing bad/evil/unwise about freeloading FLOSS. The world can and does make its own software and shares it. The folks who enjoy creating software and the folks who need software can provide it and share it. That happens whether there are 10 freeloaders or 3 billion. FLOSS scales simply because the major cost of development is bandwidth/copying, not development of the software. FLOSS is intended to be efficient and it is. Linus got it right: “Imagine ten people putting in 1 hour each every day on the project. They put in one hour of work, but because they share the end results they get nine hours of “other peoples work” for free. It sounds unfair: get nine hours of work for doing one hour. But it obviously is not.”
    • There’s nothing wrong with being a cheapskate. Everyone should be able to acquire goods and services at fair market value or not. That allows people to spend money on goods and services they want, like tractors… Years ago, many people I knew spent huge sums on automobiles. I walked, ran or took the bus for years. Then I could afford to spend some great years at university, my choice. Many students live in poverty. My net worth grew because I chose carefully on what to spend money. I repaid my student-loan in cash. It was just my first-year tuition.
  25. DrLoser wrote, “$6341.94! Why, that should keep free-loaders like you and Robert”.

    This is Free Software. The distros don’t actually produce much software. They are integrators. Other data: SPI, the folks who fund Debian, had revenue of $245K in 2011/2012 and Debian got $45K. This is not a measure of poverty, for these are voluntary organizations, but of mindshare. How many “freeloaders” must Debian have as users to raise $45K? Debian also gets donations of servers/storage/build-machines/bandwidth. It’s a very efficient operation. M$, OTOH, takes in $billions to ship what I consider a much less worthy OS and a few applications.

  26. ram says:

    The fundamental problem Microsoft can’t overcome is Linux and Linux applications have vastly more developers than Microsoft has. The Linux community not only has best computer scientists and developers in the world, it also has immense numbers of them.

  27. dougman says:

    Please, clarify the terms ‘freeloader’ and ‘pyramid of schmucks’.

  28. dougman says:

    Beggars and freeloaders, you say? Are you trying to say you have experience in that line of work? Someone of your caliber and income, wtf are doing here then? You should be out on the town living it up!

  29. DrLoser says:

    And precisely how much of that $6341.94 did you contribute, Dougie? In bitcoins or otherwise.

    Let me repeat: you’re a freeloader relying on a pyramid of schmucks, pretty much by your own admission.

    And apparently the schmucks don’t pay too well.

  30. DrLoser says:

    I highly doubt anyone would donate money to M$, but see last December $14,080 was donated to Linux Mint and to top it off they accept Bitcoin. This month alone, Linux Mint has received $6341.94, thats the way it works.

    I’ve seen beggars on the streets of poor parts of North London rake it in better than that, Dougie.

    $6341.94! Why, that should keep free-loaders like you and Robert in Software Engineers for at least … oooh, let me look at my pay check … blockquote>one whole man-month!

    Testers optional, as always.

  31. dougman says:

    I highly doubt anyone would donate money to M$, but see last December $14,080 was donated to Linux Mint and to top it off they accept Bitcoin. This month alone, Linux Mint has received $6341.94, thats the way it works.

  32. DrLoser says:

    Oh, and if you can rely on a constant supply of schmucks willing to fund the OS.

    Happy hunting!

  33. DrLoser says:

    Instead of paying for an OS, people will donate money to an OS to support it, which would be a decentralized way of doing things.

    Replacing the current decentralized way of doing things, Dougie. You’re not very good at joined-up thinking, are you?

    Well, paying for an OS is clearly evil.

    Much better to rely on a system whereby people like you and Robert get it for free, and a bunch of schmucks out there actually fund the damned thing.

    I can certainly see that as an advantage. If you’re a cheapskate.

  34. DrLoser says:

    The problem here is even some news Windows 10 machines Microsoft will make zero dollars on them.

    A problem for whom exactly, Fifi?

    The customer? The retailer? The wholesaler? The OEM? Microsoft?

    You don’t have a clue, do you?

  35. DrLoser says:

    Kinda does when you think how fast companies found their pocket books to pay for audit team when they worked out how much they depended on Openssl to make profit.

    Kinda doesn’t when you consider the five, ten, fifteen year lead-time, Fifi.

    Also kinda up in the air, because we haven’t seen any results from this fabulous and exuberant corporate spending on OpenSSL yet, have we?

    Still, $2 million or whatever it is ain’t no bag of peanuts. Unless you compare it to the amount that global corporations have “theoretically” saved by going with Free As In Beer, and consequently sticking it to the customer.

  36. oiaohm says:

    The problem here is even some news Windows 10 machines Microsoft will make zero dollars on them.

    There will be less reason to upgrade.

    It isn’t entirely clear that your assertion applies when one considers, for example, the OpenSSL suite.
    Kinda does when you think how fast companies found their pocket books to pay for audit team when they worked out how much they depended on Openssl to make profit.

    One the big problems with Open Source is how simple it can become neglected.

    Robert Pogson point of view is correct if businesses are aware how Dependant they are on different products. OpenSSL case showed how many businesses had not considered what software they required to make profit.

  37. dougman says:

    Fair point Robert, but I suppose the cost would be pennies or fractions of a cent. Instead of paying for an OS, people will donate money to an OS to support it, which would be a decentralized way of doing things.

    Example donation message:

    “Your contribution makes possible *distribution’s* mission to produce and distribute superior quality educational, informational, and cultural software that enrich the lives of the people of *country* and the world.”

  38. DrLoser says:

    Linux is a product of the world and many businesses contribute to it from the revenue they get from users in the course of their business, whatever it may be.

    Perhaps the world is not quite as ideal as you would wish it to be, Robert.

    This thing about “businesses contributing to [Linux] from the revenue they get from their customers?”

    It isn’t entirely clear that your assertion applies when one considers, for example, the OpenSSL suite.

  39. dougman wrote, “The days of paying for an OS are less ahead us, than behind us.”

    Not necessarily. People pay for GNU/Linux and Android/Linux just not directly. Linux is a product of the world and many businesses contribute to it from the revenue they get from users in the course of their business, whatever it may be. Android is mostly Google’s product and their main revenue is from ads which are paid by businesses doing business with consumers and other businesses. So, we, citizens of the world pay for FLOSS just as we pay for that other OS or Apple’s stuff. Because the user-base is so vast, the cost per user of all these operating systems is rather small, perhaps only a few $ per user if that. They days of charging ~$1K for a licence (UNIX) or ~$100 for a licence are already behind us. M$ has been charging far above the fair market value for years by hiding the price and by bundling and by enforcing a monopoly. Thank Goodness that’s over.

  40. DrLoser says:

    With the ability to self-weld, you can make as big a tool of yourself as you like!

  41. DrLoser says:

    It must be really hard for him to be this big a tool.

    Dougie is obviously not so hot on matters that might require an HSE (or the considerable expense that a Junior College education would require, as he himself has repeatedly pointed out).

    Nevertheless, there are many other shining paths to Success.

    In Dougie’s case, it’s apparently the Farmer’s Friend: self-welding!

  42. oldfart says:

    “God knows, I can’t see any other way to do that.”

    Well Doctor Il Duce, er, I mean Il Leone has bigger fish to fry. After All , he cant be bothered with little details like real answers for us.

    Sigh.

    It must be really hard for him to be this big a tool.

  43. oldfart says:

    “You are in the .0000001% percentile and such a rarity, that your opinion is meaningless when it comes to OS choices.”

    And your response has proven meaningless.

  44. DrLoser says:

    You are in the .0000001% percentile …

    Of what precisely, Dougie?

    You seem to take a peculiar delight in posts that are inherently meaningless. That is your forte, if I may admit a reluctant admiration for a master of whatever craft that might be.

    But, y’know, when you’re talking about mathematical statistics, you kinda shoulda oughta mention the statistical population upon which you base this no doubt exact calculation.

    I’ll help you out with this one. Let’s assume you meant “the population of the Earth,” and for current purposes we can assume that to be 6 billion.

    Now, leaving aside the minor issue of what distribution you assume, this means that oldfart is one of only six people on this planet who share … well, they share whatever characteristics that you might be thinking of, but didn’t quite get around to putting down in your post.

    You do realise that you have just paid oldfart a massive compliment, don’t you? Heck, even the King of Swaziland has fifteen wives!

    Something for you to ponder, Dougie. You could marry the King of Swaziland and make a name for yourself.

    God knows, I can’t see any other way to do that.

  45. dougman says:

    Farting Oldman,

    You are in the .0000001% percentile and such a rarity, that your opinion is meaningless when it comes to OS choices.

  46. oldfart says:

    “If you really want service from your software use really free software, software that works for you and not for M$. I recommend Debian GNU/Linux, a product of the world freely shared without an onerous EULA from Hell. ”

    I have a problem here.

    The applications that I use at least seem to work for me. For instance Finale 2014 combined with the garritan sample libraries and the eastwest Symphonic choirs sound libraries at lease seems to be working for me because in the end I can get the results that I desire.

    If the applications that I wish to run serve me, how can microsofts operating system not server me.

    Care to explain?

  47. kurkosdr says:

    “The days of paying for an OS are less ahead us, than behind us.”

    Maybe. Which is something I personally fear. Because OSes will come “married” with the device, and when the support stops and updates stop coming, you won’t be able to buy the new version. Just like I can’t buy Android 5.0 for my Galaxy S3.

    See, Microsoft selling upgrades means Microsoft has an incentive to make sure your old computer can run the latest version, even with some minor devices (ie dial-up modem) not working any more. If there is no incentive to sell upgrades, why bother making sure old devices are capable of upgrading to the latest version?

    Food for thought…

  48. kurkosdr says:

    ” The world, billions of people, have tasted freedom with Android/Linux and millions with GNU/Linux.”

    Then I guess this is bad news for Android TV, which is closed-source software on top of an open-source base (at least with Android for phones and tablets, you can build a Google-free image and still have things like a UI, settings screen, and some apps, not with Android TV). According to your line of thinking, people will refuse to buy Android TV because it’s not a taste of freedom.

    Anyway, as regards the news, I was surprised about the fact Windows 7 will receive free upgrades. This means anyone who has bought a Windows license in 2009 or earlier will get the latest Windows for free. Combined with Microsoft’s move to offer Windows to OEMs for free for devices under 9 inches, and it looks like they started to realise that if they want to win the war, they have to do some product dumping, like Google does with Android.

  49. dougman says:

    This plan will backfire, someone will ask “Why give it away free for one-year, why should anyone else be privileged?”

    Consumers will demand the OS be free for years…”Well if you don’t give it to me free, we’ll just stick it to Microsoft and move to Linux then, eh!!”

    The days of paying for an OS are less ahead us, than behind us.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *