Acer Returns To Profitability

Remember the netbook? It’s not dead. I noticed Acer has returned to profitability and thought I would check out its Aspire line

  • 29 models selling with GNU/Linux.
  • 17 with that other OS.

Hmmm… Maybe they’ve taken my advice and gloried in the increased profits with GNU/Linux. Yep. Revenue’s down $6.5 million but costs are down $7.9 million. That will do it. IDC reported that Acer’s global market share of units shipped rose from 7.4% to 8.4% from Q3 of 2013 to Q3 of 2014, 6.5 million units up from 6 million. There’s money to be made selling GNU/Linux for those who make the effort.

See Acer | Laptops | Models.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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31 Responses to Acer Returns To Profitability

  1. oiaohm says:

    http://gizmodo.com/this-is-samsungs-first-tizen-phone-1679406172

    Realy Samsung is starting to release tizen for low end phones.

    Deaf Spy basically if Microsoft does not settle the royalties dispute soon Samsung will not need Windows mobile for low end.

    In fact notice for a while now Samsung has told Microsoft get lost we don’t need to make any of your devices. Samsung will only make Microsoft devices when Microsoft does not interfere with other devices Samsung makes.

    Note that what the official so called said is nothing more than a rumor and its nothing more than putting a carrot in front of Microsoft nose to get a better deal for now.

    Samsung has run pilot programs on the stability of Windows 8.1 software on devices.
    Get the joke.
    http://www.ubergizmo.com/2014/11/samsung-ativ-s-windows-phone-8-1-update-released/

    Samsung has to support existing pool of existing Windows OS devices that include making sure the updates to 8.1 worked.

    Rumors have to be taken with a serous grain of salt. Deaf Spy.

    Sharp one Intel has being growing it share holdings.

  2. Deaf Spy says:

    Companies like Samsung really are likely to tell Microsoft to get lost because Microsoft is the only part in their product they don’t have direct control over.

    Really, Fifi?
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Samsung-Could-Launch-Windows-Phone-10-Devices-if-Microsoft-Settles-Dispute-469621.shtml

  3. oiaohm says:

    DrLoser again doing no research. Intel in some was is nuts. Intel support over 40 different operating systems that they do give 1 or 2 developer each to.

    On the first point, Intel really isn’t any good at developing operating systems. Therefore, they concentrate on what they are good at.
    Let pretend Wind River not exist. Were you not aware that Intel owns a OS development company.
    http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jun2009/tc2009065_713999.htm

    The reality is Intel is not good at the following.
    1) Design devices consumers want to be seen with.
    2) Having their hardware departments cooperate with there OS development departments to get products out door. Yes cases of CPU being on shelf before drivers to support such cpu is shipped happens quite a bit with Intel.

    Really a CEO at Intel over night could sort out these problems then we could have like Intel phones and tablets on shelves other than another problem.
    3) But the big one is Intel does not make LCD or OLED screens yet.

    The day we see Intel buy a LCD screen or equal production company we know trouble is coming as it the only part intel does not make that is required to make a full modern day device. We can even put a name on the LCD maker Intel is looking at acquiring that is Sharp.

    So the question is how many years until Intel buy Sharp out and starts shipping fully intel devices in the market.

    DrLoser point on Arm is kinda correct because you would not think a chip designer would get into the OS and device business. Its the groups with silcon production and device production you have to look at.

    Samsung is already in the OS game tizen and also can make every part in their devices. Companies like Samsung really are likely to tell Microsoft to get lost because Microsoft is the only part in their product they don’t have direct control over.

  4. dougman says:

    Intel does not need to develop an operating system, they can use whats existing already.

    Seems Intel has thought about this already: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/156896-intel-prepares-to-sell-its-own-market-leading-smartphones-and-tablets

    re: The very idea of ARM investing in building a new OS, even one built around the Linux kernel, is absurd! You would not be the first nor last person to call something absurd, only time will tell.

    😛

  5. DrLoser says:

    (The same goes for ARM, but even more so. In fact, ARM’s strategic approach is basically at second hand. As I’m sure you realise, Dougie, ARM is a very successful company built entirely on Intellectual Property: they license their hardware designs to other people.
    (Consequently, the very idea of ARM investing in building a new OS, even one built around the Linux kernel, is absurd.
    (But, since your otherwise hibernating thought-processes have evidently been stimulated, how about this for an interesting avenue of discussion:
    (What happens to ARM if the entire structure of Intellectual Property Rights vanishes overnight, as Linux enthusiasts devoutly hope that it will?)

  6. DrLoser says:

    After reading a post about Apple processors catching up with Intel, whats to say that Intel or ARM just take Linux and build their own OS and devices and tell M$ to piss-off.

    Two answers for the price of one question, Dougie:
    1) Ricardo’s Law of Comparative Advantage and
    2) The Macroeconomic Law of Substitutes and Complements.

    On the first point, Intel really isn’t any good at developing operating systems. Therefore, they concentrate on what they are good at.

    On the second point, Intel has a good little deal going for it whereby the two obvious OS complements to its hardware — Windows and Linux, in either order — don’t cost it a penny. Even pulling a Google and leveraging the Linux kernel into an Android-like OS would cost, I dunno, a couple of billion? These things aren’t cheap … unlike some of the users of Linux round here.

    And, because there are two mainstream OSes out there that already run on Intel hardware, there’s a built-in substitute if needs must. Why go to the trouble of building another one, when you’re not, in fact, qualified to do so?

    I offer these insights to you in the spirit (and indeed with the legalities attached) of the Creative Commons. When you finally get around to completing your High School Equivalency, Dougie, feel free to crib the lot for your award-winning Summa Cum Laude final dissertation.

  7. dougman says:

    Satrains comment got me thinking..

    After reading a post about Apple processors catching up with Intel, whats to say that Intel or ARM just take Linux and build their own OS and devices and tell M$ to piss-off.

    This is where Samsung is smart, in that you do not see Intel devices flooding the market and I suspect in time that Intel will do just that, build their own devices.

  8. satrain18 says:

    “Yep, and newer thin clients/small cheap computers based on ARM.”
    So not only you’re a Linux fanboy, you’re also a ARM fanboy.

  9. dougman wrote, “new Chromebooks”

    Yep, and newer thin clients/small cheap computers based on ARM. I think they are priced a bit high though and could use more RAM, but they are definitely usable with Android and GNU/Linux. Mainline kernel support…

  10. satrain18 says:

    Phillipines 14 models.
    And 46 Windows ones.

    China 22 models
    And 39 Windows ones.

  11. DrLoser wrote, “As of 10/11/2014, 22:19 GMT, no it does not, Robert”

    1. I am not a liar. It comes up on my system. I used the “e” out front in the FireFox address window. Why that makes a difference to the search results I don’t know because “e” is in every English page, but it does.
    2. As you may know, Google customizes search results for users that it knows. Google knows me and what I want.
    3. DrLoser says:

      “site:acer.com linux products” does bring it up on the first page, twit.

      As of 10/11/2014, 22:19 GMT, no it does not, Robert. [AD HOMINEM ATTACK REMOVED – rp]

    4. Oops. That’s “e site:acer.com linux products”.

      I have to put in the “e” because otherwise FireFox thinks it’s a mistyped URI.

    5. DrLoser wrote, “believe me, we’re not talking about anything obvious like “Acer Linux products.”

      “site:acer.com linux products” does bring it up on the first page, twit.

    6. DrLoser wrote, “if Google genuinely came up with that link on the top half of the page, then I’d be genuinely fascinated to hear what your search query was.”

      I am away from Beast, but on this computer, “linux laptop site:acer.com” brings it up on the third page and gets ~2K hits altogether. There was another hit on a similar page earlier but it didn’t catch my eye I guess. The pages I skipped otherwise were ads and community.acer.com stuff.

      If the search string is linpus laptop site:acer.com it does come up on the first page.

      DrLoser, you are wearing out your welcome. This crap is a personal attack on me, your host. Smarten up.

    7. DrLoser says:

      To quote gamer88, Robert, and obviously it’s acceptably peer-reviewed because it’s on your own blog:

      Only in Myanmar. I can tell because the ‘mm’ in ‘mm.acer.com’ stands for Myanmar. the rest of the world list mostly Windows, along with Android and ChromeOS. Why do you only cherry pick statistics that favors Linux and leave out those that favors Windows?

    8. DrLoser says:

      (MM, whatever.)

      This is not a tangent, Robert. It’s a simple question.

      Where on earth did you get this worthless link? And what made you believe that it was worth centring an entire blog post around?

    9. DrLoser says:

      I thought mm was just a strange name for a server like aa or bb on a spreadsheet.

      Be honest, Robert, no, you did not.

      You no more noticed the BB in the URL than I did.

      You just jumped on a completely random link that confirmed your personal bias.

      Oh, and if Google genuinely came up with that link on the top half of the page, then I’d be genuinely fascinated to hear what your search query was.

      As an ex-employee of Bing, I’ve got a pretty good idea of the sort of query that would result in this link. And, believe me, we’re not talking about anything obvious like “Acer Linux products.”

    10. More on mm.acer.com: it’s hosted in EU on Akamai with GNU/Linux in English.

    11. DrLoser wrote, “Why you failed to point out the country in question.”

      Google found the link. I read it. It’s not obvious at all that it’s anything to do with Myanmar. I thought mm was just a strange name for a server like aa or bb on a spreadsheet. You guys are going way off on a tangent. The point is Acer is making and selling a lot of GNU/Linux units while returning to profitability.

    12. DrLoser says:

      Acer sells GNU/Linux machines somewhere, anywhere, Burma, etc. What’s your point?

      Not my point at all, in fact, Robert. Tut tut. You should embrace your new readers like satrain18, whose point it was.

      satrain18’s very obvious point was that, for some completely unknown reason, you chose to highlight the Acer range specifically in Myanmar.

      And that you also for some completely unknown reason failed to advertise that fact.

      Thus leaving credulous n00bs like me, who have an instinctive trust in our elders and betters, to assume that your cite was generally representative.

      Go on, then. Explain to us all:

      a) Why you failed to point out the country in question. (You seem quite keen when it comes to spurious graphs from Reunion or Uruguay.)
      b) Why anybody in their right mind would conclude that Myanmar is in any way at all representative of Gnu/Linux take-up even in South East Asia?

      And, more to the point, what sort of person in Myanmar, a country with a GDP per head of roughly $1,500, is going to bother their head with a choice between:

      a) An Ultra-Professional Windows 8 machine, complete with pointless bloated Gold Taps, at $5,000? Or,
      b) An Aspire E3-111 with Linpus (price unknown, but maybe $300 or so)?

      Basically you’re looking at the military, senior politicians, and oligarchs here. Every last one of which (saving Aung San Suu Kyi) would almost certainly pay out extra for the stupid gold taps.

      Is that the future you envision for Linux?

      So, yes, if I have to own up to a point — my (borrowed) point is that you have nothing but contempt for the “little man,” do you? Unless of course they spend 20% of their annual wage on a machine they will not be able to use.

      But at least it’s FLOSS.

    13. DrLoser wrote, “linked to a web page that advertises Acer laptops and notebooks that are specifically sold in “the country that used to be known as Burma?”

      I’m glad I was walking around in the bush breathing fresh air and finding tracks rather than reading such irrelevant strawmen. Acer sells GNU/Linux machines somewhere, anywhere, Burma, etc. What’s your point? Burma is a country of > 50million people. They use IT. They use GNU/Linux. Get over it. Acer sells what they want. StatCounter shows GNU/Linux desktops there get from 1 to 2% share depending on the day.

      Some others…
      Phillipines 14 models.

      China 22 models

    14. DrLoser says:

      I literally went through that three-step process of making myself look like a buffoon, Robert.

      Perhaps, as a fully accredited academic who is open to peer review and has a legitimate beef against the editors of Wikipedia, you might just try a little harder next time?

      Myanmar, indeed.

    15. DrLoser says:

      No, wait, I admire Mr Pogson and take his word as Gospel truth at all times!

      Are you seriously suggesting, satrain18, that Robert has — clearly inadvertently — linked to a web page that advertises Acer laptops and notebooks that are specifically sold in “the country that used to be known as Burma?

      I don’t believe that Robert would stoop to those pathetic levels. Mr Pogson has principles.

      Still, at least we’ve got a more hilarious example of “Linux Desktop Success” than Reunion or Uruguay!

      Praise be to FLOSS!

    16. DrLoser says:

      No, wait, I didn’t follow your precise instructions, did I, satrain18? For some reason, I ignored Robert’s link.

      Well, how embarrassing. All Myanmar gets is a model featuring 8.1.

      “Coming soon.”

    17. DrLoser says:

      I don’t want to get pernickety, but …

      DrLoser, If you’re reading this, click on “Aspire line”, scoll down to the very bottom of the page, and look at the name of the country at the bottom right. It says “Myanmar”.

      I can indeed scroll, but a URL would be mildly helpful.

      Lacking such a cite, I find it difficult to construct a sentence involving “Myanmar” and “whacking great profits almost certainly derived by specialising in the Linux Desktop” put together.

      Sad, really. In one way or another.

    18. satrain18 says:

      DrLoser, If you’re reading this, click on “Aspire line”, scoll down to the very bottom of the page, and look at the name of the country at the bottom right. It says “Myanmar”.

    19. gamer88 says:

      Only in Myanmar. I can tell because the ‘mm’ in ‘mm.acer.com’ stands for Myanmar. the rest of the world list mostly Windows, along with Android and ChromeOS. Why do you only cherry pick statistics that favors Linux and leave out those that favors Windows?

    20. DrLoser says:

      And maybe they haven’t taken your advice, Robert.

      Whatever they’re doing, it doesn’t seem to be very successful. Your previous numbers (on Wintel lossage) suggest that Lenovo, HP and Dell are doing very well — and from memory “very well” means 7+% market growth — and that also-rans like Acer are dropping off the charts.

      Quite possibly on a parabola.

      I don’t quite see how a new market (ie Chromebooks) is really going to make a difference here, other than the obvious fact that, when you buy a Chromebook, you are completely locked in to an OS which happens not to be M$’s or Apple’s.

      Can you posit a logical progression from “working on my Chromebook” to “working on my Debian(-derived) desktop?”

      Because I can’t.

    21. gamer88 says:

      Hmmm… Maybe they’ve taken my advice and gloried in the increased profits with GNU/Linux.

      That’s in Myanmar, a third world totalitarian dictatorship.
      http://www.acer.com/worldwide/#_ga=1.167433086.119906661.1415401672

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