M$ Milks The Cash-Cow Dry -or- Consultant Recommends Migration to GNU/Linux

“Rather than pay Microsoft for custom support in 2014 and beyond, Silver advised enterprises to spend money this year to migrate as many XP systems as possible to a supported operating system. Failing that, IT administrators should consider bringing all XP clients inside the network perimeter to lower the risk of Web-based attacks, or move the applications those XP PCs are running onto a supported server platform.”
see Microsoft gooses Windows XP's custom support prices as deadline nears | ITworld.

GNU/Linux is a “supported OS”, eh? This could be just M$’s attempt to milk the last cent from those truly locked-in to XP. M$ made the cell, applied the barriers and threw away the key, holding thousands of corporations’ computers hostage. One can reinforce one’s cell by migrating to “7” or one can escape and breathe fresh air with GNU/Linux. It’s seems an easy choice to me. I am sure the consultant thinks going to “7” is the way but any nitwit can see this will happen all over again when “7” dies… That’s the Wintel-treadmill, folks. An infinite number of steps forward with no advance.

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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7 Responses to M$ Milks The Cash-Cow Dry -or- Consultant Recommends Migration to GNU/Linux

  1. oiaohm says:

    bw –XP isn’t in control of nuclear weapons systems or anything remotely like them.–

    You know the oil-spill a few years back that was Windows 9x even that it was end of life. XP was used to control USA drones until it got hacked so was confirmed as failing certification so had to be replaced. There are other locations still using it.

    Heck you still find Unix systems in key mil points that are 20 to 30 years past the last support point.

    What makes XP special nothing. This is just the nature of mil and government networks around the world. Most are over bound in red tape so replacing X server can take like 10 years even if the thing is completely security unsafe and has not been hacked yet.

    So you would call government systems reactive not pre-emptive. Attempting to be pre-emptive generates hell load of resistance even when its logically unsafe.

    –XP is in use today because companies adopted it a decade ago and have not seen any reason to change to anything newer.–
    Not exactly so. Certification is costly and slow.

    Most companies using XP now will move off XP when its support ends we saw this with 2000 and 9x before it.

    The ones that lag for years are the ones trapped in by red tapes of Certifications or Government regulation. So newer instances of any OS will not be certified for X role.

  2. bw says:

    You are just inventing castles in the air! XP isn’t in control of nuclear weapons systems or anything remotely like them. XP is in use today because companies adopted it a decade ago and have not seen any reason to change to anything newer. As long as it is filling their needs, they are spending their capital funds on more pressing needs. They clearly do not need any intensive, on-going support for such an old hat system.

  3. oiaohm says:

    bw
    –If something has been used for 12 years like XP and it hasn’t been thrown out as inadequate, it is not likely that it will succumb in the next few years.–
    You are not thinking what would have this insane bureaucracy around it. These are weapon control systems, radars, some government information systems.

    These are a class of item if they do malfunction due a bug that has not been found yet might result in you dead from the fall out. This is why Microsoft gets away with charging insane maintenance figures.

    Yes those items end up with a stupid amount of certification red tape around them to the point that the red tape is causing more risks than its preventing.

  4. bw says:

    Nothing in all that blather to change my mind. If something has been used for 12 years like XP and it hasn’t been thrown out as inadequate, it is not likely that it will succumb in the next few years. Whatever may be lurking inside that might cause trouble can be kept inside and ignored if any new use comes along to expose it.

  5. oiaohm says:

    bw just to be really stupid some of the highly certified stuff to run 100 percent stable for task at hand can take 7 to 8 years to achieve certification. So the 10 years support from redhat and 10 years by Microsoft fairly much expires by the time the political requirements of certification are done.

  6. oiaohm says:

    bw –What sort of problem could arise in 2014 that was not discovered over the previous 12 years of use?–

    Lots basically. Not every code defect is fixed in XP basically. No OS is perfect.

    –What I do not understand is the need for any further support for XP beyond 2014.–

    Reason is the same reason why Linux people set up chroots and cgroups of older OS versions. Some custom made application the companies depend on that don’t run on the newer OS’s. Some cases the companies don’t have the source code. Bill to replace can be down right expensive.

  7. bw says:

    What I do not understand is the need for any further support for XP beyond 2014. It seems to me that, if a company has been using XP since its heyday, which started in 2002, they would long since have managed to tame it to their needs. What sort of problem could arise in 2014 that was not discovered over the previous 12 years of use?

    It sounds a lot like the Y2K scare where the uninformed feared that their cars would stop running and their airliners would fall from the sky and the world might even end due to some gremlin in the works that magically appeared when some deadline was reached. Or the Mayan calendar fears of more recent times.

    Why would I care if Microsoft support ends on this old timer?

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