Robert Pogson

One man, closing all the windows.

City of Munich Hammers HP’s Report On Their Migration To GNU/Linux

technology

City of Munich Hammers HP’s Report On Their Migration To GNU/Linux

It really bugs me when some ignorant person pronounces judgment on something which he does not understand. HP’s analysis of Munich’s cost of migration to GNU/Linux is like that…
“The city’s IT department points out several errors in the published summary. The migration to free software did not require a thousand IT workers, that is the total of IT staffers working for the city. The firm also fudged the IT support costs, assuming incorrectly that the German city started out with 12,000 open source desktops. "The number of open source PCs rose gradually over the years, to its current number of over 13,000."

Contrary to the firms claims, the use of open source reduces the costs for computer hardware, writes the IT department. The firm also failed to distinguish the difference between a software migration and normal software maintenance, Munich writes. "They evaluate regular updates of the operating system as migrations."
see City of Munich stands by its calculation: open source saves millions | Joinup

Get over it, M$ and “Partners”, you can’t beat the price of FREE. Even your lock-in needs to be undone only once. That’s always less costly than buying Wintel repeatedly forever. That’s barely competing on price over just a few years. Cheat and lie all you want, M$. Your cash-cow is drying up.

7 Comments

  1. oiaohm

    Der Balrog other places migrate faster to Linux. French police doing 12000 to 14000 a year out of a install base of 90000. So about 8 years migration.

    There are those with rolling install bases. 10 year migrations between OS’s or migrating between many version of windows and not having constancy is not strange inside some companies.

    –Munich’s biggest problem was that their IT landscape was a mess which had nothing to do with the operating system.–
    Close there biggest problem was a majority of custom programs only run on Windows NT 4.0 so going either way had to be completely rewritten.

    Next was there IT landscape being a complete mess.

    Migrating from that without disruption is hard.

    Siemens is a pulse and sit not rolling conversion. Pulse has huge expend in short time frame. Company like Siemens can operate like that. Other places have no choice but to go rolling and all the headaches that brings.

  2. Der Balrog

    Munich’s biggest problem was that their IT landscape was a mess which had nothing to do with the operating system.

    Their second biggest problem was that they wanted to continue using Windows NT 4.0 and then threw a hissy fit when to their big surprise they learned that support would run out (how surprised can you be at products being phased out?).

    Their third biggest problem is that they have taken over 10 years to migrate to Linux. Ten frackin’ years. For 12,000 computers (as of 12/2012).

    Do you know how long it takes a large company like Siemens with about 400,000 employees to migrate to Windows 7? They began their pilot tests mid-2010, general deployment mid-2011, and they’ll be done with it mid-2013. More than 80 percent of their employees were already using Windows 7 at the end of 2012.

    Anywhere else Munich’s IT project managers would’ve been fired for incompetence.

  3. Robert Pogson

    Dr Loser wrote, “I expect a future (non-SDP, who’d a thought that Muenchen would be run by the SDP?) city government to reach a deal with Microsoft and spend a similar amount of time reverting the system to Windows. They could take half as long as the original migration and it would only take five years.”

    Wikipedia:
    “On 12 September 1993, Ude was elected as lord mayor and successor of Georg Kronawitter. He was re-elected three times, on 13 June 1999 with 61.2 per cent of all votes, on 3 March 2002 with 64.5 per cent and on 2 March 2008 with 66.8 per cent. In August 2011 Christian Ude announced his attention to become the SPD’s leading canditate for the upcoming Bavarian state election in 2013″

    Christian Ude is a very popular guy. He might just turn the SPD’s national fortunes a bit:
    “BERLIN, Jan. 16 (Xinhua) — Public support rate for the German opposition Social Democratic Party (SPD) dropped from last week’s 25 percent to 23 percent, a poll indicated on Wednesday, making it more difficult for its candidate Peer Steinbrueck to overcome the odds to win the chancellorship from Angela Merkel in September’s general election.”

    It’s not unusual for a regional representative to be chosen from a different party than on the national stage. No matter the federal result the federal government is not about to reverse a decision made locally. The federal parties also support FLOSS, however… A recent report by an all-party committee recommends increasing usage of FLOSS. see also German parliament study recommends to change law to boost open source

  4. oiaohm

    bw
    –The longer it goes on the more and more isolated an organization such as Munich becomes, and they are constantly faced with re-inventing what other, more widely used, products are doing. –
    Is what Munich using not widely used. Answer is wrong. It is widely used just not in the same Numbers as Microsoft.

    French police all there systems are Linux and the list goes on. Its not that isolated. Every year becoming less so.
    bw
    –Doing this diverts management focus and, if you are not actually in the business of developing and selling software, that is wasted focus from whatever your real purpose may be. Unless you want to make it the purpose of government being to save money. –

    You have forgot government job is being for the people and accessible by the people and making the economy function effectively this include reducing cost to startups. Writing software can fit into what they are meant to be doing. Lot of ways making sure startups can start up with zero cost software does help a country.

    By your statement there should be no in house software anywhere. Cost to Munich have been less than paying Microsoft. The closed source software model is meant to be cheaper than doing it yourself. Problem its not.

    Australia has had a heavy closed source in government policy. This does get to the insane. Every year on my tax return due to the closed source dependence I can write off a copy of MS windows because its required to submit a tax return. I don’t think you can call this sane.

  5. Dr Loser

    Munich is well-off?

    Well, maybe. But let’s have a little bet here. I expect a future (non-SDP, who’d a thought that Muenchen would be run by the SDP?) city government to reach a deal with Microsoft and spend a similar amount of time reverting the system to Windows. They could take half as long as the original migration and it would only take five years.

    Here’s how it would work. Let’s say that, every year, 20% of the desktop hardware base needs to be replaced. (Pick your own figure. This seems reasonable to me.) Buy new machines with a Windows license, but continue to run LibreOffice (I believe they moved on from Open a short while ago). There are no compelling technical reasons to stay on a whacko home-brew flavor of Ubuntu, so nobody will notice a degradation … plus, the lucky 20% each year will actually be able to talk to the rest of Germany (let alone the world) without a hitch.

    You can still use all those wonderful web apps that were developed to hide the fact that the platform itself doesn’t actually do what you want. Go ahead! Use Firefox!

    After the first three years, you’ve got 60% of your people moved back to a real desktop operating system. (You may have to worry about pissing off the people left behind on Ubuntu 10.04++.) At this point you negotiate with the local Microsoft reps who will be happy to offer you an advantageous Office package, possibly even Office 365 if you want to stay in the Cloud.

    Compared to the plain and obvious hell that a piecemeal ten-year migration must have caused on a daily basis, I would claim that this course of action would be practically painless.

    As you say, it’s all about efficiency, and my proposition would definitely offer that. But as you also say, it’s a good idea to get side-benefits like saving money … which should be easy. To start with, this solution ditches the not-at-all-cheap IBM consultancy services. And if that’s not enough money saved?

    Fire all the idiots who got you into this mess in the first place and have been sucking on the public teat for the last ten years.

  6. Robert Pogson

    bw wrote, of Munich’s future in IT, “The longer it goes on the more and more isolated an organization such as Munich becomes, and they are constantly faced with re-inventing what other, more widely used, products are doing.”

    Get over it. GNU/Linux and FLOSS are mainstream. Munich shares a lot with LibreOffice.org and other projects. Munich does not have to “go it alone”. Folks who stick with M$ longer have a deeper hole to escape. Munich is well off.

  7. bw

    “Your cash-cow is drying up.”

    I would think that self-serving claims by the Munich IT department are not such reliable evidence. If you asked OJ Simpson about who killed Nicole, he would say that he didn’t do it and he should know if he was there.

    Even so, it is probably true that an organization that wants to invest so much time and energy can avoid significant costs for major software systems. That does not make it a very good idea, though.

    The longer it goes on the more and more isolated an organization such as Munich becomes, and they are constantly faced with re-inventing what other, more widely used, products are doing. Doing this diverts management focus and, if you are not actually in the business of developing and selling software, that is wasted focus from whatever your real purpose may be. Unless you want to make it the purpose of government being to save money. Then you should join the GOP and abolish most government systems entirely.

Leave a comment