Robert Pogson

One man, closing all the windows.

Linux 3.6.11, Stable But Fast-moving

technology

Linux 3.6.11, Stable But Fast-moving

“I’m announcing the release of the 3.6.11 kernel.

Note, this is the LAST kernel in the 3.6.y series, it is now end-of-life. Please move to the 3.7.y kernel series at this time.”

see LKML: Greg KH: Linux 3.6.11.

Shucks. I rebuilt my kernel yesterday and I’m almost obsolete… ;-)

You can get your next kernel here. I bunzip2, check the signature on the tar file (gpg linux-3.7.1.tar.sign), untar, change to the directory and, on my Debian GNU/Linux system,

  • make mrproper
  • make oldconfig (picks up latest config from /boot/)
  • make -j 2 (use 2 CPUs)
  • make modules_install install and reboot

Takes 20 minutes or so and I have no performance issues while it grinds away.

4 Comments

  1. Robert Pogson

    Mk wrote, of building kernels, “I wonder, why you’d do it at all, especially if the kernel provided by Debian gets the job done.”

    I occasionally add new USB thingies that may or may not be recognized by the kernel in Debian, I like helping the Linux community by testing the product, and from time to time, Linux adds improvements for performance, security and the like. Also, being retired in the winter can be boring…

    Others may need a kernel that loads faster, is smaller or works with some strange hardware where they edit the configuration severely to get what they want. I did that a bit, knowing I would never have various bits of server-only hardware.

  2. Mk

    Can you give us some insights, I wonder, why you’d do it at all, especially if the kernel provided by Debian gets the job done. I’ve never felt the need to build the latest stable kernel. Have I missed much? Oh, by the way, thank you for not recommending it to ordinary desktop and mobile users. It was such a relief.

  3. kozmcrae

    It’s been said that a dictatorship is the most efficient form of government. If that’s so then a benevolent dictatorship must be the most efficient form of software development.

    It certainly seems that way with Linux.

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