Robert Pogson

One man, closing all the windows.

MySQL Cluster on the Road Again

  • Feb 16 / 2012
  • 8
technology

MySQL Cluster on the Road Again

Oracle has released version 7.2.4 which they claim is greatly improved in throughput with redundancy. The thing is huge with a .deb package of 300 MB.

This looks like the kind of product a website might use to scale up LAMP while increasing reliability. The benchmark Oracle ran on 8 servers provided 1 billion queries per minute and could do 110 million updates per minute from RAM.

“In 2002 we passed the limit of 1M reads per second. Now we’ve passed the milestone of 1B reads per minute. We achieved 1.05BN reads per minute on an 8-node cluster using MySQL Cluster 7.2.5.”

The scalability has been greatly increased:
“We’re very proud of those scalability enhancements that have made it possible to scale CPU usage per data node to more than 5x of what is possible in MySQL Cluster 7.1. In addition we’ve removed a number of bottlenecks making it possible to scale per data node performance by even more than 5x. Comparing our benchmark numbers for MySQL Cluster 7.2 we can see that we achieved 2.1M reads per second on 7.1 and we’ve achieved 17.6M reads per second, both on 8 data node set-ups using the same HW. Thus more than 8X better performance per node for MySQL Cluster 7.2 compared to 7.1.”

Even those who just add a second server for reliability might find it useful. Anything that increases throughput is useful because it doesn’t take a very complex query to bog down a single server. Perhaps the acquisition by Oracle may actually make the world a better place… Too bad they didn’t treat Java and OpenOffice.org with the same loving care.

8 Comments

  1. Robert Pogson

    Phenom wrote, “isn’t FLOSS about free software? Since when does selling software for money account as “free”?”

    FLOSS is about Free Software, where the “Free” is about freedom not price. One can legally charge money for FLOSS and deliver a licence to the buyer. Technically, the money is for the copy, i.e. the medium, rather than the software or licence, but it amounts to the same thing for the transaction. It’s not a great business plan because the buyer could legally make a bunch of copies and compete with you, so most people do not operate that way.

    From the GPL v3:
    “4. Conveying Verbatim Copies.
    You may convey verbatim copies of the Program’s source code as you receive it, in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate copyright notice; keep intact all notices stating that this License and any non-permissive terms added in accord with section 7 apply to the code; keep intact all notices of the absence of any warranty; and give all recipients a copy of this License along with the Program.

    You may charge any price or no price for each copy that you convey, and you may offer support or warranty protection for a fee.

    6. Conveying Non-Source Forms.
    You may convey a covered work in object code form under the terms of sections 4 and 5, provided that you also convey the machine-readable Corresponding Source under the terms of this License, in one of these ways:”

    Phenom wrote, “They sell MySql”.

    No, they don’t. Oracle bought MySQL lock, stock and barrel but they sell copies and support packages only. Otherwise they would fraudulently be selling one thing to several buyers. Try doing that with a car or a bridge… Oracle sells copies on different bases: the ordinary FLOSS basis and a “proprietary” model where a private deal is made between buyer and seller, usually involving the right to modify code and support.

  2. Phenom

    That’s a valid means of making a living producing FLOSS

    Wait, wait, isn’t FLOSS about free software? Since when does selling software for money account as “free”?

    they could still sell support and provide the Manager for $0 as well.
    No, they don’t. They sell MySql, and only they give you some nice, rather important instruments:
    “Oracle Premier Support for MySQL is included in Annual Subscriptions (no extra cost)”
    In other words, you buy MySQL and receive free support. Support itself gives no tools.

    Btw, I am really glad that Oracle took over MySql and are doing something about it. Since 4.0 MySql is only degrating. All new features come at the cost of lessened performance and reliability.

  3. Robert Pogson

    Phenom wrote, “that MySql Cluster Manager is available only in the paid version”

    That’s their software. They can make money selling MySQL for $0 by charging money for the manager. That’s a valid means of making a living producing FLOSS. I would expect that product would be quite welcome by anyone big enough to need the Cluster version for their business, yet the Cluster version is available for all. I see nothing wrong with Oracle’s approach because one important way to provide a service is to provide software as an “expert system”. Of course, they could still sell support and provide the Manager for $0 as well.

  4. Phenom

    The community could do that by configuration
    Except that they didn’t. Despite the numerous reports that MySQL was not scaling well. Only Google delivered some patch for 5.x which improved things a little bit, but nothing spectacular.

    And lets not forget that MySql Cluster Manager is available only in the paid version. How do like that?

  5. Robert Pogson

    @dougman
    PostgreSQL used to be faster than MySQL but the latest change has not been compared yet. I expect particular workloads will like MySQL’s latest release while others may not benefit from it. It depends on what bottleneck limits throughput. The superior performance of PostgreSQL may have been one of the motivators for Oracle’s development. OTOH, PostgreSQL was showing up Oracle database on price/performance. Perhaps now MySQL will… ;-) It’s all good. I like IT that works.

  6. Robert Pogson

    Phenom wrote, “It takes a corporation to their act together and put some paid resources to achieve something good. While in the hands of the community, MySql’s scalability was a laugh.”

    A lot of what Oracle has done is to use RAM instead of storage. The community could do that by configuration. The elimination of other bottlenecks is something the community can do but it takes time. Oracle did not do it instantly either.

  7. Phenom

    See Pogs? It takes a corporation to their act together and put some paid resources to achieve something good. While in the hands of the community, MySql’s scalability was a laugh.

    Ah, and MySql Cluster Manager is available only in the paid version: http://www.mysql.com/products/

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