Wintel Tries to Restore Former Glory – Ultrabooks

Wintel is trying desperately to upsell itself by promoting “ultrabooks”, powerful portable notebooks with fine form factors. While there is a niche market here, Apple has already filled it. People who want to pay a high price for the feeling that they have bought something better already know about Apple. Acer and Asustek have fallen into the trap of thinking ultrabooks will save them when their real problem is Wintel, Intel and M$ making money on the free labour of “partners”. These OEMs would have much larger margins by selling machines with GNU/Linux. We know they could sell product because both already do that in parts of the world. Wasting time on ultrabooks is digging their hole deeper. They should support and promote GNU/Linux to maximize the benefit of their products to the OEM and the customer.

see Digitimes – Asustek set to launch 5-6 Ultrabook models in October

About Robert Pogson

I am a retired teacher in Canada. I taught in the subject areas where I have worked for almost forty years: maths, physics, chemistry and computers. I love hunting, fishing, picking berries and mushrooms, too.
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5 Responses to Wintel Tries to Restore Former Glory – Ultrabooks

  1. oe says:

    ” Asus’s EEE PC line started out very rugged and high quality. Burdening UMPCs with Windows 7+N is going to cost them.”

    I see no point for ultra-books when the ASUS eee’s scream along with an OS change to the netbook based Linux flavors.

  2. twitter says:

    Ah Contrarian, choice is good as long as it is Microsoft that’s being offered:

    Should Apple be unopposed here, #pogson? Are you voting against any consumer choice?

    A free market would provide gnu/linux, Chrome OS, Android, OSX and perhaps Windows. When people are given a real choice, as they are with music players, cell phones and tablets, we see how little demand there is for Microsoft.

    There is very much a need for the ultra mobile PC form factor but it’s hard to see people paying $1,000 for them. I’m partial to the Thinkpad X series, which is small but usable and durable. For a single screen, the conventional 4×3 size works better for ordinary work than something than one that is intended to play movies. The trackpoint works well in tight places, like coffee shops and airplanes. Docking stations and second screens work well at the office where more conventional pointing devices and keyboards can be used if you want. You can get those used for under $400 through IBM certified used because big companies have been handing them out to their people. I can’t imagine any big company having another wave of Windows desktops when they could roll out small cheap computers. Asus and Acer could make these and run away with the market especially if they load them with Crome OS and gnu/linux. Asus’s EEE PC line started out very rugged and high quality. Burdening UMPCs with Windows 7+N is going to cost them.

  3. Contrarian says:

    That is a real boon for all the folk in Chiang Mai, Bob. Do you think that there will be a rush on real estate there based on such an amenity? I have a couple of Thai friends. They eat Palmetto beetles (not the roach thing, the one with wings) fried as a delicacy. Oddly enough, they have a Windows PC and a couple of iPhones. I guess they haven’t been back on the reservation for a while.

  4. Bob Parker says:

    Strange that Lotus Tesco in Chiang Mai Thailand offer 16/18 laptops/netbooks with Linux installed and 2/18 with Windows. Yes some of these will end up with the $3 CM version of Windows 7 Ultimate on them but for the users who just need office and internet functions the Linux will stick. Oh 3rd world maybe, just happens to be ahead of the USA and Australia in internet provision.

  5. Contrarian says:

    “While there is a niche market here, Apple has already filled it.”

    Should Apple be unopposed here, #pogson? Are you voting against any consumer choice?

    I don’t believe that Acer or Asus can effectively compete with the Apple products in this niche myself, but it seems rather un-American to tell them not to even try.

    “These OEMs would have much larger margins by selling machines with GNU/Linux.”

    Only if they could sell them at the same volume and at the same price, posgson. The conventional wisdom is that they cannot do either. People will not pay top dollar for ersatz OS and they are not interested in saving the few pennies per day that it costs to have a Windows OS on their PC.

    Time and again, various OEMs have dipped their toe into the water with Linux and have come away with a dislike for what they experienced.

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