Robert Pogson

One man, closing all the windows.

Daily Archives / Friday, July 1, 2011

  • Jul 01 / 2011
  • 0
technology

Apple Unlikely to dethrone HP as leading portable PC vendor

I have great respect for Digitimes. They have their finger on the pulse of IT, particularly in China, but they are out to lunch with the story that Apple will overtake HP in personal computing even if tablets are considered in the mix. Digitimes’ story assumes that Apple will continue with a huge share of tablets. That will fall apart because Android/Linux is being pushed by more than a dozen players large and small, each with some variation on the basic OS developed by Google. What this will mean is that consumers will be faced with many choices. While Apple has a large and growing following, the world is much bigger than Apple and consumers, particularly in the hot emerging markets will love small cheap Android/Linux tablets and smart phones.

There is no particular magic that Apple has to prevent the same fate that befell the smart phone. A year ago Apple was triumphant. Today they are a follower in the crowd. Consumers did not buy only iPhones and they will not buy only iPads.

see Digitimes – Apple likely to dethrone HP as leading portable PC vendor

It is possible that Apple will topple HP on the basis of the iPad but it is much more likely that hordes of really neat Android/Linux tablets will swarm all over Apple and HP both. Remember, the first half of 2011, Apple mostly had the tablet market to itself. Now versions of Android/Linux designed for tablets are in play and big and small players are rushing product to market maxing out supply chains. Apple has secured huge supplies of components but the world is springing to produce more.

  • Jul 01 / 2011
  • 34
technology

Prima Facie Case of Anti-trust

M$ produces so many products that are not the first choice of people making choices. Why is it that M$ is given a free ride on retail shelves? It’s not consumer choice. We see repeatedly that, given the choice of software, consumers choose anything but M$’s stuff. This is strong evidence that M$ has colluded with OEMs and retailers over a long period of time to exclude competition in operating systems on personal computers.

  • Jul 01 / 2011
  • 3
technology

Do You Really Want to be M$’s Slave?

M$ has a great racket going. They do a few $billion of work creating software and then get others to sell/distribute it for free. The result is $billons of licensing fees flowing in far beyond the normal return of a productive business. The secret is that M$’s partners are slaves, working for free. Sure, the consumers pay M$’s partners, but M$ gets the service for free and the partners do the vast majority of the work. M$ rakes in around $60 billion annually and has 100K employees. That’s $600K per employee… How much does your average employee make?

The slaves are becoming restless, however. They have been re-enlisting customers for decades but now M$ wants to cut the slaves out of the profits. M$’s office suite in the cloud will be billed directly from M$ with no middleman. Thank you very much, slave, for giving me this new cash-cow. Good-bye.

see Microsoft dismisses reseller critics of Office 365

  • “resellers relying on purely transacting licences were going to find life increasingly tough”
  • “If you are not customising or adding value you should not be in the food chain”

Well, partners, who’s really running your business? Should you be feeding M$? Should M$ be rattling your chain? Wasn’t it only a decade ago that M$ was telling OEMs they had severe limits on customization? Maybe M$ should not be in the food chain. If you have to actually work for a living, shouldn’t M$ do the same?

  • Jul 01 / 2011
  • 0
technology

Energy for IT

While ARM, thin clients and Moore’s Law give us many opportunities to save on energy expenditures for IT, one can also consider supplying energy for IT from renewable resources such as solar, wind and water. In my home two or more PCs are running all day long. My wife uses a “desktop” PC which consumes about 100W for case, monitor, keyboard and mouse (yes, the keyboard and mouse are wireless…). I use a notebook which runs about 60W. We could switch to thin clients and cut the total by 100W or so but then we would need 100W of server so there is not much to be gained in total energy consumption. Schools where I have worked, on the other hand, have 100 PCs and two or three servers so there would be a huge savings there. Continue Reading